• We report the result of optical identifications of FIRST radio sources with the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program survey (HSC-SSP). The positional cross-match within 1" between the FIRST and HSC-SSP catalogs (i ~< 26) produced more than 3600 optical counterparts in the 156 deg^2 of the HSC-SSP field. The matched counterparts account for more than 50 % of the FIRST sources in the search field, which substantially exceeds previously reported fractions of SDSS counterparts (i ~< 22) of ~ 30 %. Among the matched sample, 9 % are optically unresolved sources such as radio-loud quasars. The optically faint (i > 21) radio galaxies (RGs) show a flatter slope of a fitting linear function of the 1.4 GHz source counts than the bright RGs, while optically faint radio quasars show a steeper slope than the bright radio quasars. The optically faint RGs shows a flat slope in the i-band number counts down to 24 mag, implying either less-massive or distant radio-AGNs beyond 24 mag. The photometric redshift and the comparison of colors with the galaxy models show that most of the matched RGs are distributed at redshifts from 0 to 1.5. The optically faint sample includes the high radio-loudness sources that are not seen in the optically bright sample. Such sources are located at a redshift of larger than 1. This study provides a large number of radio-AGNs lying at the optically faint end and high redshift regime that are not probed by the previous searches.
  • We investigate a relation between surface densities (at a $\sim 1$kpc scale) of star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass ($M_{*}$) namely spatially resolved star formation main sequence (SFMS) at $z\sim 0$ and $z\sim 1$ of massive ($\log(M_{*}/M_{\odot})>10.5$) face-on disc galaxies and examine the evolution of the relation with cosmic time. The spatially resolved SFMS of $z\sim 0$ galaxies is discussed in a companion paper. For $z\sim 1$ sample, we use 8 bands imaging dataset from CANDELS and 3D-HST which provides a rest-frame FUV-NIR SED for galaxies at $0.8\lesssim z \lesssim 1.8$. We perform a pixel-to-pixel SED fitting to derive the spatially resolved SFR and $M_{*}$ distributions in a galaxy. We find a linear spatially resolved SFMS in the $z\sim 1$ galaxies that lie within $\pm 0.3$ dex from the global SFMS, while a "flattening" at high $\Sigma_{*}$ end is found in the spatially resolved SFMS of the galaxies that lie below $-0.3$ dex from the global SFMS. The "flattening" trend is consistent with a decline of the sSFR radial profile (sSFR$(r)$) in the central region of the corresponding galaxies. Comparison with the spatially resolved SFMS in the $z\sim 0$ galaxies shows smaller difference in the sSFR at low $\Sigma_{*}$ ($\sim 0.4$ dex at $\log(\Sigma_{*}[M_{\odot} \text{kpc}^{-2}])=7.0$) than that at high $\Sigma_{*}$ ($\sim 1.5$ dex at $\log(\Sigma_{*}[M_{\odot} \text{kpc}^{-2}])=8.5$). This trend is consistent with the evolution of the sSFR$(r)$ radial profile, which shows a faster decrease in the central region than in the outskirt, agrees with the inside-out quenching scenario. We then derive an empirical model for the evolution of the $\Sigma_{*}(r)$, $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}(r)$ and sSFR$(r)$ radial profiles. Based on the empirical model, we estimate the radial profile of the quenching timescale and reproduce the observed spatially resolved SFMS at $z\sim 1$ and $z\sim 0$.
  • We construct a sample of X-ray bright optically faint active galactic nuclei by combining Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam, XMM-Newton, and infrared source catalogs. 53 X-ray sources satisfying i band magnitude fainter than 23.5 mag and X-ray counts with EPIC-PN detector larger than 70 are selected from 9.1 deg^2, and their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and X-ray spectra are analyzed. 44 objects with an X-ray to i-band flux ratio F_X/F_i>10 are classified as extreme X-ray-to-optical flux sources. SEDs of 48 among 53 are represented by templates of type 2 AGNs or starforming galaxies and show signature of stellar emission from host galaxies in the optical in the source rest frame. Infrared/optical SEDs indicate significant contribution of emission from dust to infrared fluxes and that the central AGN is dust obscured. Photometric redshifts determined from the SEDs are in the range of 0.6-2.5. X-ray spectra are fitted by an absorbed power law model, and the intrinsic absorption column densities are modest (best-fit log N_H = 20.5-23.5 cm^-2 in most cases). The absorption corrected X-ray luminosities are in the range of 6x10^42 - 2x10^45 erg s^-1. 20 objects are classified as type 2 quasars based on X-ray luminsosity and N_H. The optical faintness is explained by a combination of redshifts (mostly z>1.0), strong dust extinction, and in part a large ratio of dust/gas.
  • We conduct a systematic search for galaxy protoclusters at $z\sim3.8$ based on the latest internal data release (S16A) of the Hyper SuprimeCam Subaru strategic program (HSC-SSP). In the Wide layer of the HSC-SSP, we investigate the large-scale projected sky distribution of $g$-dropout galaxies over an area of $121\,\mathrm{deg^2}$, and identify 216 large-scale overdense regions ($>4\sigma$ overdensity significance) that are good protocluster candidates. Of these, 37 are located within $8\,\mathrm{arcmin}$ ($3.4\,\mathrm{physicalMpc}$) from other protocluster candidates of higher overdensity, and are expected to merge into a single massive structure by $z=0$. Therefore, we find 179 unique protocluster candidates in our survey. A cosmological simulation that includes projection effects predicts that more than 76\% of these candidates will evolve into galaxy clusters with halo masses of at least $10^{14}\,M_{\odot}$ by $z=0$. The unprecedented size of our protocluster candidate catalog allowed us to perform, for the first time, an angular clustering analysis of the systematic sample of protocluster candidates. We find a correlation length of $35.0\,h^{-1}\,\mathrm{Mpc}$. The relation between correlation length and number density of $z\sim3.8$ protocluster candidates is consistent with the prediction of the $\Lambda$CDM model, and the correlation length is similar to that of rich clusters in the local universe. This result suggests that our protocluster candidates are tracing similar spatial structures as those expected of the progenitors of rich clusters and enhances the confidence that our method to identify protoclusters at high redshifts is robust. In the coming years, our protocluster search will be extended to the entire HSC-SSP Wide sky coverage of $\sim1400\,\mathrm{deg^2}$ to probe cluster formation over a wide redshift range of $z\sim2\mathrm{-}6$.
  • We study the UV luminosity functions (LFs) at $z\sim 4$, $5$, $6,$ and $7$ based on the deep large-area optical images taken by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru strategic program (SSP). On the 100 deg$^2$ sky of the HSC SSP data available to date, we make enormous samples consisting of a total of 579,565 dropout candidates at $z\sim 4-7$ by the standard color selection technique, 358 out of which are spectroscopically confirmed by our follow-up spectroscopy and other studies. We obtain UV LFs at $z \sim 4-7$ that span a very wide UV luminosity range of $\sim 0.002 - 100 \, L_{\rm UV}^\ast$ ($-26 < M_{\rm UV} < -14$ mag) by combining LFs from our program and the ultra-deep Hubble Space Telescope legacy surveys. We derive three parameters of the best-fit Schechter function, $\phi^\ast$, $M_{\rm UV}^\ast$, and $\alpha$, of the UV LFs in the magnitude range where the AGN contribution is negligible, and find that $\alpha$ and $\phi^\ast$ decrease from $z\sim 4$ to $7$ with no significant evolution of $M_{\rm UV}^\ast$. Because our HSC SSP data bridge the LFs of galaxies and AGNs with great statistical accuracy, we carefully investigate the bright end of the galaxy UV LFs that are estimated by the subtraction of the AGN contribution either aided with spectroscopy or the best-fit AGN UV LFs. We find that the bright end of the galaxy UV LFs cannot be explained by the Schechter function fits at $> 2 \sigma$ significance, and require either double power-law functions or modified Schechter functions that consider a magnification bias due to gravitational lensing.
  • We present clustering properties from 579,492 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z~4-6 over the 100 deg^2 sky (corresponding to a 1.4 Gpc^3 volume) identified in early data of the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru strategic program survey. We derive angular correlation functions (ACFs) of the HSC LBGs with unprecedentedly high statistical accuracies at z~4-6, and compare them with the halo occupation distribution (HOD) models. We clearly identify significant ACF excesses in 10"<$\theta$<90", the transition scale between 1- and 2-halo terms, suggestive of the existence of the non-linear halo bias effect. Combining the HOD models and previous clustering measurements of faint LBGs at z~4-7, we investigate dark-matter halo mass (Mh) of the z~4-7 LBGs and its correlation with various physical properties including the star-formation rate (SFR), the stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR), and the dark matter accretion rate (dotMh) over a wide-mass range of Mh/M$_\odot$=4x10^10-4x10^12. We find that the SHMR increases from z~4 to 7 by a factor of ~4 at Mh~1x10^11 M$_\odot$, while the SHMR shows no strong evolution in the similar redshift range at Mh~1x10^12 M$_\odot$. Interestingly, we identify a tight relation of SFR/dotMh-Mh showing no significant evolution beyond 0.15 dex in this wide-mass range over z~4-7. This weak evolution suggests that the SFR/dotMh-Mh relation is a fundamental relation in high-redshift galaxy formation whose star formation activities are regulated by the dark matter mass assembly. Assuming this fundamental relation, we calculate the cosmic SFR densities (SFRDs) over z=0-10 (a.k.a. Madau-Lilly plot). The cosmic SFRD evolution based on the fundamental relation agrees with the one obtained by observations, suggesting that the cosmic SFRD increase from z~10 to 4-2 (decrease from z~4-2 to 0) is mainly driven by the increase of the halo abundance (the decrease of the accretion rate).
  • We have measured the clustering of galaxies around active galactic nuclei (AGN) for which single-epoch virial masses of the super-massive black hole (SMBH) are available to investigate the relation between the large scale environment of AGNs and the evolution of SMBHs. The AGN samples used in this work were derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observations and the galaxy samples were from 240~deg$^{2}$ S15b data of the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP). The investigated redshift range is 0.6--3.0, and the masses of the SMBHs lie in the range $10^{7.5}$--$10^{10}$~M$_{\odot}$. The absolute magnitude of the galaxy samples reaches to $M_{\lambda 310}$ $\sim$ $-$18 at rest frame wavelength 310~nm for the low-redshift end of the samples. More than 70\% of the galaxies in the analysis are blue. We found a significant dependence of the cross-correlation length on redshift, which primarily reflects the brightness dependence of the galaxy clustering. At the lowest redshifts the cross-correlation length increases from 7~$h^{-1}$~Mpc around $M_{\lambda 310}$$ = $$-19$~mag to $>$10~$h^{-1}$~Mpc beyond $M_{\lambda 310}$$ = $$-20$~mag. No significant dependence of the cross-correlation length on BH mass was found for whole galaxy samples dominated by blue galaxies, while there was an indication of BH mass dependence in the cross-correlation with red galaxies. These results provides a picture of the environment of AGNs studied in this paper being enriched with blue starforming galaxies, and a fraction of the galaxies are being evolved to red galaxies along with the evolution of SMBHs in that system.
  • We investigate the galaxy overdensity around proto-cluster scale quasar pairs at high (z>3) and low (z~1) redshift based on the unprecedentedly wide and deep optical survey of the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP). Using the first-year survey data covering effectively ~121 deg^2 with the 5sigma depth of i~26.4 and the SDSS DR12Q catalog, we find two luminous pairs at z~3.3 and 3.6 which reside in >5sigma overdense regions of g-dropout galaxies at i<25. The projected separations of the two pairs are R_perp=1.75 and 1.04 proper Mpc, and their velocity offsets are Delta V=692 and 1448 km s^{-1}, respectively. This result is in clear contrast to the average z~4 quasar environments as discussed in Uchiyama et al. (2017) and implies that the quasar activities of the pair members are triggered via major mergers in proto-clusters, unlike the vast majority of isolated quasars in general fields that may turn on via non-merger events such as bar and disk instabilities. At z~1, we find 37 pairs with R_perp<2 pMpc and Delta V<2300 km s^{-1} in the current HSC-Wide coverage, including four from Hennawi et al. (2006). The distribution of the peak overdensity significance within two arcminutes around the pairs has a long tail toward high density (>4sigma) regions. Thanks to the large sample size, we find a statistical evidence that this excess is unique to the pair environments when compared to single quasar and randomly selected galaxy environments at the same redshift range. Moreover, there are nine small-scale (R_perp<1 pMpc) pairs, two of which are found to reside in cluster fields. Our results demonstrate that <2 pMpc-scale quasar pairs at both redshift range tend to occur in massive haloes, although perhaps not the most massive ones, and that they are useful to search for rare density peaks.
  • We present spectroscopic identification of 32 new quasars and luminous galaxies discovered at 5.7 < z < 6.8. This is the second in a series of papers presenting the results of the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs) project, which exploits the deep multi-band imaging data produced by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program survey. The photometric candidates were selected by a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm, and then observed with spectrographs on the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope. Combined with the sample presented in the previous paper, we have now identified 64 HSC sources over about 430 deg2, which include 33 high-z quasars, 14 high-z luminous galaxies, 2 [O III] emitters at z ~ 0.8, and 15 Galactic brown dwarfs. The new quasars have considerably lower luminosity (M1450 ~ -25 to -22 mag) than most of the previously known high-z quasars. Several of these quasars have luminous (> 10^(43) erg/s) and narrow (< 500 km/s) Ly alpha lines, and also a possible mini broad absorption line system of N V 1240 in the composite spectrum, which clearly separate them from typical quasars. On the other hand, the high-z galaxies have extremely high luminosity (M1450 ~ -24 to -22 mag) compared to other galaxies found at similar redshift. With the discovery of these new classes of objects, we are opening up new parameter spaces in the high-z Universe. Further survey observations and follow-up studies of the identified objects, including the construction of the quasar luminosity function at z ~ 6, are ongoing.
  • We examine the clustering of quasars over a wide luminosity range, by utilizing 901 quasars at $\overline{z}_{\rm phot}\sim3.8$ with $-24.73<M_{\rm 1450}<-22.23$ photometrically selected from the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) S16A Wide2 date release and 342 more luminous quasars at $3.4<z_{\rm spec}<4.6$ having $-28.0<M_{\rm 1450}<-23.95$ from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that fall in the HSC survey fields. We measure the bias factors of two quasar samples by evaluating the cross-correlation functions (CCFs) between the quasar samples and 25790 bright $z\sim4$ Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) in $M_{\rm 1450}<-21.25$ photometrically selected from the HSC dataset. Over an angular scale of \timeform{10.0"} to \timeform{1000.0"}, the bias factors are $5.93^{+1.34}_{-1.43}$ and $2.73^{+2.44}_{-2.55}$ for the low and high luminosity quasars, respectively, indicating no luminosity dependence of quasar clustering at $z\sim4$. It is noted that the bias factor of the luminous quasars estimated by the CCF is smaller than that estimated by the auto-correlation function (ACF) over a similar redshift range, especially on scales below \timeform{40.0"}. Moreover, the bias factor of the less-luminous quasars implies the minimal mass of their host dark matter halos (DMHs) is $0.3$-$2\times10^{12}h^{-1}M_{\odot}$, corresponding to a quasar duty cycle of $0.001$-$0.06$.
  • We present the luminosity function of z=4 quasars based on the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program Wide layer imaging data in the g, r, i, z, and y bands covering 339.8 deg^2. From stellar objects, 1666 z~4 quasar candidates are selected by the g-dropout selection down to i=24.0 mag. Their photometric redshifts cover the redshift range between 3.6 and 4.3 with an average of 3.9. In combination with the quasar sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the same redshift range, the quasar luminosity function covering the wide luminosity range of M1450=-22 to -29 mag is constructed. It is well described by a double power-law model with a knee at M1450=-25.36+-0.13 mag and a flat faint-end slope with a power-law index of -1.30+-0.05. The knee and faint-end slope show no clear evidence of redshift evolution from those at z~2. The flat slope implies that the UV luminosity density of the quasar population is dominated by the quasars around the knee, and does not support the steeper faint-end slope at higher redshifts reported at z>5. If we convert the M1450 luminosity function to the hard X-ray 2-10keV luminosity function using the relation between UV and X-ray luminosity of quasars and its scatter, the number density of UV-selected quasars matches well with that of the X-ray-selected AGNs above the knee of the luminosity function. Below the knee, the UV-selected quasars show a deficiency compared to the hard X-ray luminosity function. The deficiency can be explained by the lack of obscured AGNs among the UV-selected quasars.
  • We investigate the relation between star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass ($M_*$) in sub-galactic ($\sim 1$kpc) scale of 93 local ($0.01<z<0.02$) massive ($M_*>10^{10.5}M_{\odot}$) spiral galaxies. To derive spatially-resolved SFR and stellar mass, we perform so-called pixel-to-pixel SED fitting, which fits an observed spatially-resolved multiband SED with a library of model SEDs using Bayesian statistics approach. We use 2 bands (FUV and NUV) and 5 bands ($u$, $g$, $r$, $i$, and $z$) imaging data from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), respectively. We find a tight nearly linear relation between the local surface density of SFR ($\Sigma_{\rm{SFR}}$) and stellar mass ($\Sigma_{*}$) which has flattening in high $\Sigma_{*}$. The near linear relation between $\Sigma_{*}$ and $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ suggests constant sSFR throughout the galaxies, and the scatter of the relation is directly related to that of sSFR. Therefore, we analyse the variation of sSFR in various scales. More massive galaxies on average have lower sSFR throughout them than less massive galaxies. We also find that barred galaxies have lower sSFR in a core region than non-barred galaxies. However, in the outside region, sSFR of barred and non-barred galaxies are similar and lead to the similar total sSFR.
  • We investigate the star forming activity of a sample of infrared (IR)-bright dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) that show an extreme red color in the optical and IR regime, $(i - [22])_{\rm AB} > 7.0$. Combining an IR-bright DOG sample with the flux at 22 $\mu$m $>$ 3.8 mJy discovered by Toba & Nagao (2016) with IRAS faint source catalog version 2 and AKARI far-IR (FIR) all-sky survey bright source catalog version 2, we selected 109 DOGs with FIR data. For a subsample of 7 IR-bright DOGs with spectroscopic redshift ($0.07 < z < 1.0$) that was obtained from literature, we estimated their IR luminosity, star formation rate (SFR), and stellar mass based on the spectral energy distribution fitting. We found that (i) WISE 22 $\mu$m luminosity at observed frame is a good indicator of IR luminosity for IR-bright DOGs and (ii) the contribution of active galactic nucleus (AGN) to IR luminosity increases with IR luminosity. By comparing the stellar mass and SFR relation for our DOG sample and literature, we found that most of IR-bright DOGs lie significantly above the main sequence of star-forming galaxies at similar redshift, indicating that the majority of IRAS- and/or AKARI-detected IR-bright DOGs are starburst galaxies.
  • We present measurements of the clustering properties of a sample of infrared (IR) bright dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs). Combining 125 deg$^2$ of wide and deep optical images obtained with the Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope and all-sky mid-IR (MIR) images taken with Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, we have discovered 4,367 IR-bright DOGs with $(i - [22])_{\rm AB}$ $>$ 7.0 and flux density at 22 $\mu$m $>$ 1.0 mJy. We calculate the angular autocorrelation function (ACF) for a uniform subsample of 1411 DOGs with 3.0 mJy $<$ flux (22 $mu$m) $<$ 5.0 mJy and $i_{\rm AB}$ $<$ 24.0. The ACF of our DOG subsample is well-fit with a single power-law, $\omega (\theta)$ = (0.010 $\pm$ 0.003) $\theta^{-0.9}$, where $\theta$ in degrees. The correlation amplitude of IR-bright DOGs is larger than that of IR-faint DOGs, which reflects a flux-dependence of the DOG clustering, as suggested by Brodwin et al. (2008). We assume that the redshift distribution for our DOG sample is Gaussian, and consider 2 cases: (1) the redshift distribution is the same as IR-faint DOGs with flux at 22 $\mu$m $<$ 1.0 mJy, mean and sigma $z$ = 1.99 $\pm$ 0.45, and (2) $z$ = 1.19 $\pm$ 0.30, as inferred from their photometric redshifts. The inferred correlation length of IR-bright DOGs is $r_0$ = 12.0 $\pm$ 2.0 and 10.3 $\pm$ 1.7 $h^{-1}$ Mpc, respectively. IR-bright DOGs reside in massive dark matter halos with a mass of $\log [\langle M_{\mathrm{h}} \rangle / (h^{-1} M_{\odot})]$ = 13.57$_{-0.55}^{+0.50}$ and 13.65$_{-0.52}^{+0.45}$ in the two cases, respectively.
  • The chemical abundances for five metal-poor stars in and towards the Galactic bulge have been determined from H-band infrared spectroscopy taken with the RAVEN multi-object adaptive optics science demonstrator and the IRCS spectrograph at the Subaru 8.2-m telescope. Three of these stars are in the Galactic bulge and have metallicities between -2.1 < [Fe/H] < -1.5, and high [alpha/Fe] ~+0.3, typical of Galactic disk and bulge stars in this metallicity range; [Al/Fe] and [N/Fe] are also high, whereas [C/Fe] < +0.3. An examination of their orbits suggests that two of these stars may be confined to the Galactic bulge and one is a halo trespasser, though proper motion values used to calculate orbits are quite uncertain. An additional two stars in the globular cluster M22 show [Fe/H] values consistent to within 1 sigma, although one of these two stars has [Fe/H] = -2.01 +/- 0.09, which is on the low end for this cluster. The [alpha/Fe] and [Ni/Fe] values differ by 2 sigma, with the most metal-poor star showing significantly higher values for these elements. M22 is known to show element abundance variations, consistent with a multi-population scenario (i.e. Marino et al. 2009, 2011; Alves-Brito et al. 2012) though our results cannot discriminate this clearly given our abundance uncertainties. This is the first science demonstration of multi-object adaptive optics with high resolution infrared spectroscopy, and we also discuss the feasibility of this technique for use in the upcoming era of 30-m class telescope facilities.
  • We constrain the rate of gas inflow into and outflow from a main-sequence star-forming galaxy at z~1.4 by fitting a simple analytic model for the chemical evolution in a galaxy to the observational data of the stellar mass, metallicity, and molecular gas mass fraction. The molecular gas mass is derived from CO observations with a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor, and the gas metallicity is derived from the H{\alpha} and [NII]{\lambda} 6584 emission line ratio. Using a stacking analysis of CO integrated intensity maps and the emission lines of H{\alpha} and [NII], the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and gas mass fraction is derived. We constrain the inflow and outflow rates with least-chi-square fitting of a simple analytic chemical evolution model to the observational data. The best-fit inflow and outflow rates are ~1.7 and ~0.4 in units of star-formation rate, respectively. The inflow rate is roughly comparable to the sum of the star-formation rate and outflow rate, which supports the equilibrium model for galaxy evolution; i.e., all inflow gas is consumed by star formation and outflow.
  • We report the discovery of a new ultra-faint dwarf satellite companion of the Milky Way based on the early survey data from the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program. This new satellite, Virgo I, which is located in the constellation of Virgo, has been identified as a statistically significant (5.5 sigma) spatial overdensity of star-like objects with a well-defined main sequence and red giant branch in their color-magnitude diagram. The significance of this overdensity increases to 10.8 sigma when the relevant isochrone filter is adopted for the search. Based on the distribution of the stars around the likely main sequence turn-off at r ~ 24 mag, the distance to Virgo I is estimated as 87 kpc, and its most likely absolute magnitude calculated from a Monte Carlo analysis is M_V = -0.8 +/- 0.9 mag. This stellar system has an extended spatial distribution with a half-light radius of 38 +12/-11 pc, which clearly distinguishes it from a globular cluster with comparable luminosity. Thus, Virgo I is one of the faintest dwarf satellites known and is located beyond the reach of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This demonstrates the power of this survey program to identify very faint dwarf satellites. This discovery of VirgoI is based only on about 100 square degrees of data, thus a large number of faint dwarf satellites are likely to exist in the outer halo of the Milky Way.
  • We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs) project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100 % at the brighter magnitudes (zAB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Ly alpha lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z > 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M1450 ~ -22 mag or zAB ~24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.
  • In tomographic adaptive-optics (AO) systems, errors due to tomographic wave-front reconstruction limit the performance and angular size of the scientific field of view (FoV), where AO correction is effective. We propose a multi time-step tomographic wave-front reconstruction method to reduce the tomographic error by using the measurements from both the current and the previous time-steps simultaneously. We further outline the method to feed the reconstructor with both wind speed and direction of each turbulence layer. An end-to-end numerical simulation, assuming a multi-object AO (MOAO) system on a 30 m aperture telescope, shows that the multi time-step reconstruction increases the Strehl ratio (SR) over a scientific FoV of 10 arcminutes in diameter by a factor of 1.5--1.8 when compared to the classical tomographic reconstructor, depending on the guide star asterism and with perfect knowledge of wind speeds and directions. We also evaluate the multi time-step reconstruction method and the wind estimation method on the RAVEN demonstrator under laboratory setting conditions. The wind speeds and directions at multiple atmospheric layers are measured successfully in the laboratory experiment by our wind estimation method with errors below 2 \ms. With these wind estimates, the multi time-step reconstructor increases the SR value by a factor of 1.2--1.5, which is consistent with a prediction from end-to-end numerical simulation.
  • We present basic properties of $\sim$3,300 emission line galaxies detected by the FastSound survey, which are mostly H$\alpha$ emitters at $z \sim$ 1.2-1.5 in the total area of about 20 deg$^2$, with the H$\alpha$ flux sensitivity limit of $\sim 1.6 \times 10^{-16} \rm erg \ cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ at 4.5 sigma. This paper presents the catalogs of the FastSound emission lines and galaxies, which will be open to the public in the near future. We also present basic properties of typical FastSound H$\alpha$ emitters, which have H$\alpha$ luminosities of $10^{41.8}$-$10^{43.3}$ erg/s, SFRs of 20--500 $M_\odot$/yr, and stellar masses of $10^{10.0}$--$10^{11.3}$ $M_\odot$. The 3D distribution maps for the four fields of CFHTLS W1--4 are presented, clearly showing large scale clustering of galaxies at the scale of $\sim$ 100--600 comoving Mpc. Based on 1,105 galaxies with detections of multiple emission lines, we estimate that contamination of non-H$\alpha$ lines is about 4% in the single-line emission galaxies, which are mostly [OIII]$\lambda$5007. This contamination fraction is also confirmed by the stacked spectrum of all the FastSound spectra, in which H$\alpha$, [NII]$\lambda \lambda$6548,6583, [SII]$\lambda \lambda$6717, 6731, and [OI]$\lambda \lambda$6300,6364 are seen.
  • We measure the redshift-space correlation function from a spectroscopic sample of 2783 emission line galaxies from the FastSound survey. The survey, which uses the Subaru Telescope and covers the redshift ranges of $1.19<z<1.55$, is the first cosmological study at such high redshifts. We detect clear anisotropy due to redshift-space distortions (RSD) both in the correlation function as a function of separations parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight and its quadrupole moment. RSD has been extensively used to test general relativity on cosmological scales at $z<1$. Adopting a LCDM cosmology with the fixed expansion history and no velocity dispersion $\sigma_{\rm v}=0$, and using the RSD measurements on scales above 8Mpc/h, we obtain the first constraint on the growth rate at the redshift, $f(z)\sigma_8(z)=0.482\pm 0.116$ at $z\sim 1.4$ after marginalizing over the galaxy bias parameter $b(z)\sigma_8(z)$. This corresponds to $4.2\sigma$ detection of RSD. Our constraint is consistent with the prediction of general relativity $f\sigma_8\sim 0.392$ within the $1-\sigma$ confidence level. When we allow $\sigma_{\rm v}$ to vary and marginalize it over, the growth rate constraint becomes $f\sigma_8=0.494^{+0.126}_{-0.120}$. We also demonstrate that by combining with the low-z constraints on $f\sigma_8$, high-z galaxy surveys like the FastSound can be useful to distinguish modified gravity models without relying on CMB anisotropy experiments.
  • We conducted observations of 12CO(J=5-4) and dust thermal continuum emission toward twenty star-forming galaxies on the main sequence at z~1.4 using ALMA to investigate the properties of the interstellar medium. The sample galaxies are chosen to trace the distributions of star-forming galaxies in diagrams of stellar mass-star formation rate and stellar mass-metallicity. We detected CO emission lines from eleven galaxies. The molecular gas mass is derived by adopting a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor and assuming a CO(5-4)/CO(1-0) luminosity ratio of 0.23. Molecular gas masses and its fractions (molecular gas mass/(molecular gas mass + stellar mass)) for the detected galaxies are in the ranges of (3.9-12) x 10^{10} Msun and 0.25-0.94, respectively; these values are significantly larger than those in local spiral galaxies. The molecular gas mass fraction decreases with increasing stellar mass; the relation holds for four times lower stellar mass than that covered in previous studies, and that the molecular gas mass fraction decreases with increasing metallicity. Stacking analyses also show the same trends. The dust thermal emissions were clearly detected from two galaxies and marginally detected from five galaxies. Dust masses of the detected galaxies are (3.9-38) x 10^{7} Msun. We derived gas-to-dust ratios and found they are 3-4 times larger than those in local galaxies. The depletion times of molecular gas for the detected galaxies are (1.4-36) x 10^{8} yr while the results of the stacking analysis show ~3 x 10^{8} yr. The depletion time tends to decrease with increasing stellar mass and metallicity though the trend is not so significant, which contrasts with the trends in local galaxies.
  • We present the results from a large near-infrared spectroscopic survey with Subaru/FMOS (\textit{FastSound}) consisting of $\sim$ 4,000 galaxies at $z\sim1.4$ with significant H$\alpha$ detection. We measure the gas-phase metallicity from the [N~{\sc ii}]$\lambda$6583/H$\alpha$ emission line ratio of the composite spectra in various stellar mass and star-formation rate bins. The resulting mass-metallicity relation generally agrees with previous studies obtained in a similar redshift range to that of our sample. No clear dependence of the mass-metallicity relation with star-formation rate is found. Our result at $z\sim1.4$ is roughly in agreement with the fundamental metallicity relation at $z\sim0.1$ with fiber aperture corrected star-formation rate. We detect significant [S~{\sc ii}]$\lambda\lambda$6716,6731 emission lines from the composite spectra. The electron density estimated from the [S~{\sc ii}]$\lambda\lambda$6716,6731 line ratio ranges from 10 -- 500 cm$^{-3}$, which generally agrees with that of local galaxies. On the other hand, the distribution of our sample on [N~{\sc ii}]$\lambda$6583/H$\alpha$ vs. [S~{\sc ii}]$\lambda\lambda$6716,6731/H$\alpha$ is different from that found locally. We estimate the nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio (N/O) from the N2S2 index, and find that the N/O in galaxies at $z\sim1.4$ is significantly higher than the local values at a fixed metallicity and stellar mass. The metallicity at $z\sim1.4$ recalculated with this N/O enhancement taken into account decreases by 0.1 -- 0.2 dex. The resulting metallicity is lower than the local fundamental metallicity relation.
  • We report optical-infrared (IR) properties of faint 1.3 mm sources (S_1.3mm = 0.2-1.0 mJy) detected with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) field. We searched for optical/IR counterparts of 8 ALMA-detected sources (>=4.0 sigma, the sum of the probability of spurious source contamination is ~1) in a K-band source catalog. Four ALMA sources have K-band counterpart candidates within a 0.4" radius. Comparison between ALMA-detected and undetected K-band sources in the same observing fields shows that ALMA-detected sources tend to be brighter, more massive, and more actively forming stars. While many of the ALMA-identified submillimeter-bright galaxies (SMGs) in previous studies lie above the sequence of star-forming galaxies in stellar mass--star-formation rate plane, our ALMA sources are located in the sequence, suggesting that the ALMA-detected faint sources are more like `normal' star-forming galaxies rather than `classical' SMGs. We found a region where multiple ALMA sources and K-band sources reside in a narrow photometric redshift range (z ~ 1.3-1.6) within a radius of 5" (42 kpc if we assume z = 1.45). This is possibly a pre-merging system and we may be witnessing the early phase of formation of a massive elliptical galaxy.
  • Warren Skidmore, Ian Dell'Antonio, Misato Fukugawa, Aruna Goswami, Lei Hao, David Jewitt, Greg Laughlin, Charles Steidel, Paul Hickson, Luc Simard, Matthias Schöck, Tommaso Treu, Judith Cohen, G.C. Anupama, Mark Dickinson, Fiona Harrison, Tadayuki Kodama, Jessica R. Lu, Bruce Macintosh, Matt Malkan, Shude Mao, Norio Narita, Tomohiko Sekiguchi, Annapurni Subramaniam, Masaomi Tanaka, Feng Tian, Michael A'Hearn, Masayuki Akiyama, Babar Ali, Wako Aoki, Manjari Bagchi, Aaron Barth, Varun Bhalerao, Marusa Bradac, James Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, Scott Chapman, Ranga-Ram Chary, Masashi Chiba, Michael Cooper, Asantha Cooray, Ian Crossfield, Thayne Currie, Mousumi Das, G.C. Dewangan, Richard de Grijs, Tuan Do, Subo Dong, Jarah Evslin, Taotao Fang, Xuan Fang, Christopher Fassnacht, Leigh Fletcher, Eric Gaidos, Roy Gal, Andrea Ghez, Mauro Giavalisco, Carol A. Grady, Thomas Greathouse, Rupjyoti Gogoi, Puragra Guhathakurta, Luis Ho, Priya Hasan, Gregory J. Herczeg, Mitsuhiko Honda, Masa Imanishi, Hanae Inami, Masanori Iye, Jason Kalirai, U.S. Kamath, Stephen Kane, Nobunari Kashikawa, Mansi Kasliwal, Vishal Kasliwal, Evan Kirby, Quinn M. Konopacky, Sebastien Lepine, Di Li, Jianyang Li, Junjun Liu, Michael C. Liu, Enrigue Lopez-Rodriguez, Jennifer Lotz, Philip Lubin, Lucas Macri, Keiichi Maeda, Franck Marchis, Christian Marois, Alan Marscher, Crystal Martin, Taro Matsuo, Claire Max, Alan McConnachie, Stacy McGough, Carl Melis, Leo Meyer, Michael Mumma, Takayuki Muto, Tohru Nagao, Joan R. Najita, Julio Navarro, Michael Pierce, Jason X. Prochaska, Masamune Oguri, Devendra K. Ojha, Yoshiko K. Okamoto, Glenn Orton, Angel Otarola, Masami Ouchi, Chris Packham, Deborah L. Padgett, Shashi Bhushan Pandey, Catherine Pilachowsky, Klaus M. Pontoppidan, Joel Primack, Shalima Puthiyaveettil, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, Naveen Reddy, Michael Rich, Matthew J. Richter, James Schombert, Anjan Ananda Sen, Jianrong Shi, Kartik Sheth, R. Srianand, Jonathan C. Tan, Masayuki Tanaka, Angelle Tanner, Nozomu Tominaga, David Tytler, Vivian U, Lingzhi Wang, Xiaofeng Wang, Yiping Wang, Gillian Wilson, Shelley Wright, Chao Wu, Xufeng Wu, Renxin Xu, Toru Yamada, Bin Yang, Gongbo Zhao, Hongsheng Zhao
    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the Universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the University of California, the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA) and US associate partner, the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).