• Binary neutron-star mergers (BNSMs) are among the most readily detectable gravitational-wave (GW) sources with LIGO. They are also thought to produce short $\gamma$-ray bursts (SGRBs), and kilonovae that are powered by r-process nuclei. Detecting these phenomena simultaneously would provide an unprecedented view of the physics during and after the merger of two compact objects. Such a Rosetta Stone event was detected by LIGO/Virgo on 17 August 2017 at a distance of $\sim40$~Mpc. We monitored the position of the BNSM with ALMA at 338.5 GHz and GMRT at 1.4 GHz, from 1.4 to 44 days after the merger. Our observations rule out any afterglow more luminous than $3\times 10^{26}~{\rm erg~s}^{-1}$ in these bands, probing $>$2--4 dex fainter than previous SGRB limits. We match these limits, in conjunction with public data announcing the appearance of X-ray and radio emission in the weeks after the GW event, to templates of off-axis afterglows. Our broadband modeling suggests that GW170817 was accompanied by a SGRB and that the GRB jet, powered by $E_{\rm AG,\,iso}\sim10^{50}$~erg, had a half-opening angle of $\sim20^\circ$, and was misaligned by $\sim41^\circ$ from our line of sight. The data are also consistent with a more powerful, collimated jet: $E_{\rm AG,\,iso}\sim10^{51}$~erg, $\theta_{1/2,\,\rm jet}\sim5^\circ$, $\theta_{\rm obs}\sim17^\circ$. This is the most conclusive detection of an off-axis GRB afterglow and the first associated with a BNSM-GW event to date. We use the viewing angle estimates to infer the initial bulk Lorentz factor and true energy release of the burst.
  • We present the second Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow catalog, greatly expanding on the first Swift UVOT GRB afterglow catalog. The second catalog is constructed from a database containing over 120,000 independent UVOT observations of 538 GRBs first detected by Swift, the High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE2), the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), the Interplanetary Network (IPN), Fermi, and Astro-rivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE). The catalog covers GRBs discovered from 2005 Jan 17 to 2010 Dec 25. Using photometric information in three UV bands, three optical bands, and a `white' or open filter, the data are optimally co-added to maximize the number of detections and normalized to one band to provide a detailed light curve. The catalog provides positional, temporal, and photometric information for each burst, as well as Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) GRB parameters. Temporal slopes are provided for each UVOT filter. The temporal slope per filter of almost half the GRBs are fit with a single power-law, but one to three breaks are required in the remaining bursts. Morphological comparisons with the X-ray reveal that approximately 75% of the UVOT light curves are similar to one of the four morphologies identified by Evans et al. (2009). The remaining approximately 25% have a newly identified morphology. For many bursts, redshift and extinction corrected UV/optical spectral slopes are also provided at 2000, 20,000, and 200,000 seconds.
  • We present a wide dataset of gamma-ray, X-ray, UVOIR, and radio observations of the Swift GRB100814A. At the end of the slow decline phase of the X-ray and optical afterglow, this burst shows a sudden and prominent rebrightening in the optical band only, followed by a fast decay in both bands. The optical rebrightening also shows chromatic evolution. Such a puzzling behaviour cannot be explained by a single component model. We discuss other possible interpretations, and we find that a model that incorporates a long-lived reverse shock and forward shock fits the temporal and spectral properties of GRB100814A the best.
  • We present optical and ultraviolet (UV) photometry and spectra of the very nearby and highly reddened supernova (SN) 2014J in M82 obtained with the Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Comparison of the UVOT grism spectra of SN~2014J with Hubble Space Telescope observations of SN2011fe or UVOT grism spectra of SN~2012fr are consistent with an extinction law with a low value of R_V~1.4. The high reddening causes the detected photon distribution in the broadband UV filters to have a much longer effective wavelength than for an unreddened SN. The light curve evolution is consistent with this shift and does not show a flattening due to photons being scattered back into the line of sight. The light curve shapes and color evolution are inconsistent with a contribution scattered into the line of sight by circumstellar dust. We conclude that most or all of the high reddening must come from interstellar dust. We show that even for a single dust composition, there is not a unique reddening law caused by circumstellar scattering. Rather, when considering scattering from a time-variable source, we confirm earlier studies that the reddening law is a function of the dust geometry, column density, and epoch. We also show how an assumed geometry of dust as a foreground sheet in mixed stellar/dust systems will lead to a higher inferred R_V. Rather than assuming the dust around SNe is peculiar, SNe may be useful probes of the interstellar reddening laws in other galaxies.
  • Among Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) exist a class of overluminous objects whose ejecta mass is inferred to be larger than the canonical Chandrasekhar mass. We present and discuss the UV/optical photometric light curves, colors, absolute magnitudes, and spectra of three candidate Super-Chandrasekhar mass SNe--2009dc, 2011aa, and 2012dn--observed with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. The light curves are at the broad end for SNe Ia, with the light curves of SN~2011aa being amongst the broadest ever observed. We find all three to have very blue colors which may provide a means of excluding these overluminous SNe from cosmological analysis, though there is some overlap with the bluest of "normal" SNe Ia. All three are overluminous in their UV absolute magnitudes compared to normal and broad SNe Ia, but SNe 2011aa and 2012dn are not optically overluminous compared to normal SNe Ia. The integrated luminosity curves of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn in the UVOT range (1600-6000 Angstroms) are only half as bright as SN~2009dc, implying a smaller 56Ni yield. While not enough to strongly affect the bolometric flux, the early time mid-UV flux makes a significant contribution at early times. The strong spectral features in the mid-UV spectra of SNe 2009dc and 2012dn suggest a higher temperature and lower opacity to be the cause of the UV excess rather than a hot, smooth blackbody from shock interaction. Further work is needed to determine the ejecta and 56Ni masses of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn and fully explain their high UV luminosities.
  • We present the gamma-ray, X-ray, optical and radio data for GRB100814A. At the end of the slow decline phase of the X-ray and optical afterglow, a sudden and prominent rebrightening in the optical band occurs followed by a fast decay in both bands. This optical rebrightening is accompanied by possible chromatic variations. We discuss possible interpretations, such as double component scenarios and internal dissipation mechanism, with their virtues and drawbacks. We also compare GRB100814A with other Swift bursts that show optical rebrightenings with similar properties.
  • We present the earliest ultraviolet (UV) observations of the bright Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe/PTF11kly in the nearby galaxy M101 at a distance of only 6.4 Mpc. It was discovered shortly after explosion by the Palomar Transient Factory and first observed by Swift/UVOT about a day after explosion. The early UV light is well-defined, with ~20 data points per filter in the five days after explosion. These early and well-sampled UV observations form new template light curves for comparison with observations of other SNe Ia at low and high redshift. We report fits from semi-empirical models of the explosion and find the time evolution of the early UV flux to be well fit by the superposition of two parabolic curves. Finally, we use the early UV flux measurements to examine a possible shock interaction with a non-degenerate companion. From models predicting the measurable shock emission, we find that even a solar mass companion at a distance of a few solar radii is unlikely at more than 95% confidence.
  • We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift UltraViolet/Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM, ROTSE, and CTIO 1.3-m telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to approximately 100,000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data cover a wide energy range, from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 to 16,000 Angstrom). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18,000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 3000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray burst jets are complex and will require detailed modelling to fully understand them.
  • We present results of Swift optical, UV and X-ray observations of the afterglow of GRB 050801. The source is visible over the full optical, UV and X-ray energy range of the Swift UVOT and XRT instruments.Both optical and X-ray lightcurves exhibit a broad plateau (\Delta t/t ~ 1) during the first few hundred seconds after the gamma-ray event. We investigate the multiwavelength spectral and timing properties of the afterglow, and we suggest that the behaviour at early times is compatible with an energy injection by a newly born magnetar with a period of a few tenths of a millisecond, which keeps the forward shock refreshed over this short interval by irradiation. Reverse shock emission is not observed. Its suppression might be due to GRB ejecta being permeated by high magnetic fields, as expected for outflows powered by a magnetar.Finally, the multiwavelength study allows a determination of the burst redshift, z=1.56.
  • We present the results of the analysis of gamma-ray and X-ray data of GRB 050401 taken with the Swift satellite, together with a series of ground-based follow-up observations. The Swift X-ray light curve shows a clear break at about 4900 seconds after the GRB. The decay indices before and after the break are consistent with a scenario of continuous injection of radiation from the 'central engine' of the GRB to the fireball. Alternatively, this behaviour could result if ejecta are released with a range of Lorentz factors with the slower shells catching up the faster at the afterglow shock position. The two scenarios are observationally indistinguishable. The GRB 050401 afterglow is quite bright in the X-ray band but weak in the optical, with an optical to X-ray flux ratio similar to those of 'dark bursts'. We detect a significant amount of absorption in the X-ray spectrum, with N_H = (1.7 +/- 0.2) x 10^22 cm^-2 at a redshift of z=2.9, which is typical of a dense circumbust medium. Such high column density implies an unrealistic optical extinction of 30 magnitudes if we adopt the Galactic extinction law, which would not consistent with optical detection of the afterglow. This suggests that the extinction law is different from the Galactic one.