• SN 2017dio shows both spectral characteristics of a type-Ic supernova (SN) and signs of a hydrogen-rich circumstellar medium (CSM). Prominent, narrow emission lines of H and He are superposed on the continuum. Subsequent evolution revealed that the SN ejecta are interacting with the CSM. The initial SN Ic identification was confirmed by removing the CSM interaction component from the spectrum and comparing with known SNe Ic, and reversely, adding a CSM interaction component to the spectra of known SNe Ic and comparing them to SN 2017dio. Excellent agreement was obtained with both procedures, reinforcing the SN Ic classification. The light curve constrains the pre-interaction SN Ic peak absolute magnitude to be around $M_g = -17.6$ mag. No evidence of significant extinction is found, ruling out a brighter luminosity required by a SN Ia classification. These pieces of evidence support the view that SN 2017dio is a SN Ic, and therefore the first firm case of a SN Ic with signatures of hydrogen-rich CSM in the early spectrum. The CSM is unlikely to have been shaped by steady-state stellar winds. The mass loss of the progenitor star must have been intense, $\dot{M} \sim 0.02$ $(\epsilon_{H\alpha}/0.01)^{-1}$ $(v_\textrm{wind}/500$ km s$^{-1}$) $(v_\textrm{shock}/10 000$ km s$^{-1})^{-3}$ $M_\odot$~yr$^{-1}$, peaking at a few decades before the SN. Such a high mass loss rate might have been experienced by the progenitor through eruptions or binary stripping.
  • Multi-messenger emissions from SN1987A and GW170817/GRB170817A suggest a Universe rife with multi-messenger transients associated with black holes and neutron stars. For LIGO-Virgo, soon to be joined by KAGRA, these observations promise unprecedented opportunities to probe the central engines of core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) and gamma-ray bursts. Compared to neutron stars, central engines powered by black hole-disk or torus systems may be of particular interest to multi-messenger observations by the relatively large energy reservoir $E_J$ of angular momentum, up to 29\% of total mass in the Kerr metric. These central engines are expected from relatively massive stellar progenitors and compact binary coalescence involving a neutron star. We review prospects of multi-messenger emission by catalytic conversion of $E_J$ by a non-axisymmetric disk or torus. Observational support for this radiation process is found in a recent identification of ${\cal E}\simeq (3.5\pm1)\%M_\odot c^2$ in Extended Emission to GW170817 at a significance of 4.2\,$\sigma$ concurrent with GRB170817A. A prospect on similar emissions from nearby CC-SNe justifies the need for all-sky blind searches of long duration bursts by heterogeneous computing.
  • We present 888 visual-wavelength spectra of 122 nearby type II supernovae (SNe II) obtained between 1986 and 2009, and ranging between 3 and 363 days post explosion. In this first paper, we outline our observations and data reduction techniques, together with a characterization based on the spectral diversity of SNe~II. A statistical analysis of the spectral matching technique is discussed as an alternative to non-detection constraints for estimating SN explosion epochs. The time evolution of spectral lines is presented and analysed in terms of how this differs for SNe of different photometric, spectral, and environmental properties: velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths, decline rates, magnitudes, time durations, and environment metallicity. Our sample displays a large range in ejecta expansion velocities, from $\sim9600$ to $\sim1500$ km s$^{-1}$ at 50 days post explosion with a median H$_{\alpha}$ value of 7300 km s$^{-1}$. This is most likely explained through differing explosion energies. Significant diversity is also observed in the absolute strength of spectral lines, characterised through their pseudo-equivalent widths. This implies significant diversity in both temperature evolution (linked to progenitor radius) and progenitor metallicity between different SNe~II. Around 60\% of our sample show an extra absorption component on the blue side of the H$_{\alpha}$ P-Cygni profile ("Cachito" feature) between 7 and 120 days since explosion. Studying the nature of Cachito, we conclude that these features at early times (before $\sim35$ days) are associated with \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda6355$, while past the middle of the plateau phase they are related to high velocity (HV) features of hydrogen lines.
  • Context. In the context of an in-depth understanding of GRBs and their possible use in cosmology, some important correlations between the parameters that describe their emission have been discovered, among which the "Ep,i-Eiso" correlation is the most studied. Because of this, it is fundamental to shed light on the peculiar behaviour of a few events, namely GRB 980425 and GRB 031203, that appear to be important outliers of the Ep,i-Eiso correlation. Aims. In this paper we investigate if the locations of GRB 980425 and GRB 031203, the two (apparent) outliers of the correlation, may be due to an observational bias caused by the lacking detection of the soft X-ray emissions associated with these GRBs, from respectively the BATSE detector on-board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observer and INTEGRAL, that were operating at the epoch of the observations. We analyse the observed emission of other similar sub-energetic bursts (GRBs 060218, 100316D and 161219B) observed by Swift and whose integrated emissions match the Ep,i-Eiso relation. We simulate their integrated and time-resolved emissions as would have been observed by the same detectors that observed GRB 980425 and GRB 031203, aimed at reconstructing the light curve and spectra of these bursts. Results. If observed by old generation instruments, GRB 060218, 100316D and 161219B would appear as outliers of the Ep,i-Eiso relation, while if observed with Swift or WFM GRB 060218 would perfectly match the correlation. We also note that the instrument BAT alone (15-150 keV) actually measured 060218 as an outlier. Conclusions. We suggest that if GRB 980425 and GRB 031203 would have been observed by Swift and by eXTP they may have matched the Ep,i-Eiso relation. This provides strong support to the idea that instrumental biases can make some events in the lower-left corner of the Ep,i-Eiso plane appearing as outliers of the "Amati relation".
  • The super-luminous object ASASSN-15lh (SN2015L) is an extreme event with a total energy $E_{rad}\simeq 1.1\times 10^{52}$ erg in black body radiation on par with its kinetic energy $E_k$ in ejecta and a late time plateau in the UV, that defies a nuclear origin. It likely presents a new explosion mechanism for hydrogen-deprived supernovae. With no radio emission and no H-rich environment we propose to identify $E_{rad}$ with dissipation of a baryon-poor outflow in the optically thick remnant stellar envelope produced by a central engine. By negligible time scales of light crossing and radiative cooling of the envelope, SN2015L's light curve closely tracks the evolution of this engine. We here model its light curve by the evolution of black hole spin, during angular momentum loss in Alv\'en waves to matter at the Inner Most Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO). The duration is determined by $\sigma=M_T/M$ of the torus mass $M_T$ around the black hole of mass $M$: $\sigma\sim 10^{-7}$ and $\sigma\sim 10^{-2}$ for SN2015L and, respectively, a long GRB. The observed electromagnetic radiation herein represents a minor output of the rotational energy $E_{rot}$ of the black hole, while most is radiated unseen in gravitational radiation. This model explains the high-mass slow-spin binary progenitor of GWB150914, as the remnant of two CC-SNe in an intra-day binary of two massive stars. This model rigorously predicts a change in magnitude $\Delta m\simeq 1.15$ in the light curve post-peak, in agreement with the light curve of SN2015L with no fine-tuning.
  • We report on the evidence of highly blue-shifted resonance lines of the singly ionised isotope of 7BeII in high resolution UVES spectra of Nova Sagittarii 2015 No. 2 (V5668 Sgr). The resonance doublet lines 7BeII at lambda 313.0583, 313.1228 nm are clearly detected in several non saturated and partially resolved high velocity components during the evolution of the outburst. The total absorption identified with Beryllium has an equivalent width much larger than all other elements and comparable to hydrogen. We estimate an atomic fraction N(7Be)/N(Ca) ~ 53-69 from unsaturated and resolved absorption components. The detection of 7Be in several high velocity components shows that it has been freshly created in a thermonuclear runaway via the reaction 3He}(alpha,gamma) 7Be during the Nova explosion, as postulated by Arnould and Norgaard (1975) , however in much larger amounts than predicted by current models. 7Be decays to 7Li with a half-life of 53.22 days, comparable to the temporal span covered by the observations. The non detection of LiI requires that LiII remains ionised throughout our observations. The massive 7Be ejecta result into a 7Li production that is about 4.7-4.9 dex above the meteoritic abundance. If such a high production is common even in a small fraction (~5%) of Novae, they can make all the "stellar" 7Li of the Milky Way.
  • We aimed to detect a supernova (SN) shock breakout (SBO) with observations in time domain. The SBO marks the first escape of radiation from the blast wave that breaks through the photosphere of the star and launches the SN ejecta, and peaks in the ultraviolet and soft X-ray bands. The detection of a SBO allows determining the onset of the explosion with an accuracy from a few hours to a few seconds. Using the XRT and UVOT instruments onboard the Swift satellite we carried out a weekly cadenced, six months lasting monitoring of seven nearby (distance <50 Mpc) galaxies, namely NGC1084, NGC2207/IC2163, NGC2770, NGC4303/M61, NGC3147, NGC3690, NGC6754. We searched for variable/transient sources in the collected data. We found no evidence for a SN SBO event, but we discovered five objects located within the light of the sample galaxies that are variable in the X-ray and/or in the UV. Our sample galaxies are within the Universe volume that will be reached by the forthcoming advanced gravitational waves (GW) detectors (a-LIGO/a-Virgo), thus this work provides an example on how to carry out Swift surveys useful to detect the GW signal from SNe, and to detect counterparts to GW triggers.
  • Gravitational wave bursts in the formation of neutron stars and black holes in energetic core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are of potential interest to LIGO-Virgo and KAGRA. Events nearby are readily discovered using moderately sized telescopes. CC-SNe are competitive with mergers of neutron stars and black holes, if the fraction producing an energetic output in gravitational waves exceeds about 1\%. This opportunity motivates the design of a novel Sejong University Core-CollapsE Supernova Survey (SUCCESS), to provide triggers for follow-up searches for gravitational waves. It is based on the 76 cm Sejong University Telescope (SUT) for weekly monitoring of nearby star-forming galaxies, i.e., M51, M81-M82 and Blue Dwarf Galaxies from the Unified Nearby Galaxy Catalog with an expected yield of a few hundred per year. Optical light curves will be resolved for the true time-of-onset for probes of gravitational waves by broadband time-sliced matched filtering.
  • Context: Data from cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and supernovae Ia (SNe-Ia) support a constant dark energy equation of state with $w_0 \sim -1$. Measuring the evolution of $w$ along the redshift is one of the most demanding challenges for observational cosmology. Aims: We discuss the existence of a close relation for GRBs, named Combo-relation, based on characteristic parameters of GRB phenomenology such as the prompt intrinsic peak energy $E_{p,i}$, the X-ray afterglow, the initial luminosity of the shallow phase $L_0$, the rest-frame duration $\tau$ of the shallow phase, and the index of the late power-law decay $\alpha_X$. We use it to measure $\Omega_m$ and the evolution of the dark energy equation of state. We also propose a new calibration method for the same relation, which reduces the dependence on SNe Ia systematics. Methods: We have selected a sample of GRBs with 1) a measured redshift $z$; 2) a determined intrinsic prompt peak energy $E_{p,i}$, and 3) a good coverage (0.3-10) keV afterglow light curves. The fitting technique of the rest.frame (0.3-10) keV luminosity light curves represents the core of the Combo-relation. We separate the early steep decay, considered a part of the prompt emission, from the X-ray afterglow additional component. Data with the largest positive residual, identified as flares, are automatically eliminated until the p-value of the fit becomes greater than 0.3. Results: We strongly minimize the dependency of the Combo-GRB calibration on SNe Ia. We also measure a small extra-Poissonian scatter of the Combo-relation, which allows us to infer from GRBs alone $\Omega_M =0.29^{+0.23}_{-0.15}$ (1$\sigma$) for the $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model, and $\Omega_M =0.40^{+0.22}_{-0.16}$, $w_0 = -1.43^{+0.78}_{-0.66}$ for the flat-Universe variable equation of state case.
  • SN 2012ec is a Type IIP supernova (SN) with a progenitor detection and comprehensive photospheric-phase observational coverage. Here, we present Very Large Telescope and PESSTO observations of this SN in the nebular phase. We model the nebular [O I] 6300, 6364 lines and find their strength to suggest a progenitor main-sequence mass of 13-15 Msun. SN 2012ec is unique among hydrogen-rich SNe in showing a distinct and unblended line of stable nickel [Ni II] 7378. This line is produced by 58Ni, a nuclear burning ash whose abundance is a sensitive tracer of explosive burning conditions. Using spectral synthesis modelling, we use the relative strengths of [Ni II] 7378 and [Fe II] 7155 (the progenitor of which is 56Ni) to derive a Ni/Fe production ratio of 0.20pm0.07 (by mass), which is a factor 3.4pm1.2 times the solar value. High production of stable nickel is confirmed by a strong [Ni II] 1.939 micron line. This is the third reported case of a core-collapse supernova producing a Ni/Fe ratio far above the solar value, which has implications for core-collapse explosion theory and galactic chemical evolution models.
  • The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) classifies cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) into short (less than 2 s) and long (over 2 s) events, commonly attributed to mergers of compact objects and, respectively, peculiar core-collapse supernovae. This standard classification has recently been challenged by the {\em Swift} discovery of short GRBs showing Extended Emission (SGRBEE) and nearby long GRBs without an accompanying supernova (LGRBN). Both show an initial hard pulse, characteristic of SGRBs, followed by a long duration soft tail. We here consider the spectral peak energy ($E_{p,i}$)-radiated energy $(E_{iso})$ correlation and the redshift distributions to probe the astronomical and physical origin of these different classes of GRBs. We consider {\em Swift} events of $15$ SGRBs, $7$ SGRBEEs, 3 LGRBNs and 230 LGRBs. The spectral-energy properties of the initial pulse of both SGRBEE and LGRBNs are found to coincide with those of SGRBs. A Monte Carlo simulation shows that the redshift distributions of SGRBs, SGRBEE and LGRBNs fall outside the distribution of LGRBs at 4.75$\,\sigma$, 4.67$\,\sigma$ and 4.31$\sigma$, respectively. A distinct origin of SGRBEEs with respect to LGRBs is also supported by the elliptical host galaxies of the SGRBEE events 050509B and 050724. This combined evidence supports the hypothesis that SGRBEE and LGRBNs originate in mergers as SGRBs. Moreover, long/soft tail of SGRB and LGRBNs satisfy the same $E_{p,i}-E_{iso}$ Amati-correlation holding for normal LGRBs. This fact points to rapidly rotating black holes as a common long-lived inner engine produced by different astronomical progenitors (mergers and supernovae).
  • In a few dozen seconds gamma ray bursts (GRBs) emit up to 10^54 erg in terms of an equivalent isotropically radiated energy Eiso, so they can be observed up to z ~10. Thus, these phenomena appear to be very promising tools to describe the expansion rate history of the universe. Here we review the use of the Ep,i - Eiso correlation of GRBs to measure the cosmological density parameter Omega_M. We show that the present data set of Gamma-Ray Bursts, coupled with the assumption that we live in a flat universe, can provide independent evidence, from other probes, that Omega_M ~0.3. We show that current (e.g., Swift, Fermi/GBM, Konus-WIND) and forthcoming GRB experiments (e.g., CALET/GBM, SVOM, Lomonosov/UFFO, LOFT/WFM) will allow us to constrain Omega_M with an accuracy comparable to that currently exhibited by Type Ia supernovae and to study the properties of dark energy and their evolution with time.
  • We discuss the results of the analysis of multi-wavelength data for the afterglows of GRB 081007 and GRB 090424, two bursts detected by Swift. One of them, GRB 081007, also shows a spectroscopically confirmed supernova, SN 2008hw, which resembles SN 1998bw in its absorption features, while the maximum luminosity is only about half as large as that of SN 1998bw. Bright optical flashes have been detected in both events, which allows us to derive solid constraints on the circumburst-matter density profile. This is particularly interesting in the case of GRB 081007, whose afterglow is found to be propagating into a constant-density medium, yielding yet another example of a GRB clearly associated with a massive star progenitor which did not sculpt the surroundings with its stellar wind. There is no supernova component detected in the afterglow of GRB 090424, likely due to the brightness of the host galaxy, comparable to the Milky Way. We show that the afterglow data are consistent with the presence of both forward- and reverse-shock emission powered by relativistic outflows expanding into the interstellar medium. The absence of optical peaks due to the forward shock strongly suggests that the reverse shock regions should be mildly magnetized. The initial Lorentz factor of outflow of GRB 081007 is estimated to be \Gamma ~ 200, while for GRB 090424 a lower limit of \Gamma > 170 is derived. We also discuss the prompt emission of GRB 081007, which consists of just a single pulse. We argue that neither the external forward-shock model nor the shock-breakout model can account for the prompt emission data and suggest that the single-pulse-like prompt emission may be due to magnetic energy dissipation of a Poynting-flux dominated outflow or to a dissipative photosphere.
  • A subset of ultraluminous X-ray sources (those with luminosities < 10^40 erg/s) are thought to be powered by the accretion of gas onto black holes with masses of ~5-20 M_solar, probably via an accretion disc. The X-ray and radio emission are coupled in such Galactic sources, with the radio emission originating in a relativistic jet thought to be launched from the innermost regions near the black hole, with the most powerful emission occurring when the rate of infalling matter approaches a theoretical maximum (the Eddington limit). Only four such maximal sources are known in the Milky Way, and the absorption of soft X-rays in the interstellar medium precludes determining the causal sequence of events that leads to the ejection of the jet. Here we report radio and X-ray observations of a bright new X-ray source whose peak luminosity can exceed 10^39 erg/s in the nearby galaxy, M31. The radio luminosity is extremely high and shows variability on a timescale of tens of minutes, arguing that the source is highly compact and powered by accretion close to the Eddington limit onto a stellar mass black hole. Continued radio and X-ray monitoring of such sources should reveal the causal relationship between the accretion flow and the powerful jet emission.
  • We present optical and NIR spectroscopic observations of U Sco 2010 outburst. From the analysis of lines profiles we identify a broad and a narrow component and show that the latter originates from the reforming accretion disk. We show that the accretion resumes shortly after the outburst, on day +8, roughly when the super-soft (SSS) X-ray phase starts. Consequently U Sco SSS phase is fueled (in part or fully) by accretion and should not be used to estimate $m_{\mathrm{rem}}$, the mass of accreted material which has not been ejected during the outburst. In addition, most of the He emission lines, and the HeII lies in particular, form in the accretion flow/disk within the binary and are optically thick, thus preventing an accurate abundance determination. A late spectrum taken in quiescence and during eclipse shows CaII H&K, the G-band and MgI b absorption from the secondary star. However, no other significant secondary star features have been observed at longer wavelengths and in the NIR band.
  • We present the spectroscopic and photometric evolution of the nearby (z = 0.059) spectroscopically confirmed type Ic supernova, SN 2010bh, associated with the soft, long-duration gamma-ray burst (X-ray flash) GRB 100316D. Intensive follow-up observations of SN 2010bh were performed at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the X-shooter and FORS2 instruments. Owing to the detailed temporal coverage and the extended wavelength range (3000--24800 A), we obtained an unprecedentedly rich spectral sequence among the hypernovae, making SN 2010bh one of the best studied representatives of this SN class. We find that SN 2010bh has a more rapid rise to maximum brightness (8.0 +/- 1.0 rest-frame days) and a fainter absolute peak luminosity (L_bol~3e42 erg/s) than previously observed SN events associated with GRBs. Our estimate of the ejected (56)Ni mass is 0.12 +/- 0.02 Msun. From the broad spectral features we measure expansion velocities up to 47,000 km/s, higher than those of SNe 1998bw (GRB 980425) and 2006aj (GRB 060218). Helium absorption lines He I lambda5876 and He I 1.083 microm, blueshifted by ~20,000--30,000 km/s and ~28,000--38,000 km/s, respectively, may be present in the optical spectra. However, the lack of coverage of the He I 2.058 microm line prevents us from confirming such identifications. The nebular spectrum, taken at ~186 days after the explosion, shows a broad but faint [O I] emission at 6340 A. The light-curve shape and photospheric expansion velocities of SN 2010bh suggest that we witnessed a highly energetic explosion with a small ejected mass (E_k ~ 1e52 erg and M_ej ~ 3 Msun). The observed properties of SN 2010bh further extend the heterogeneity of the class of GRB supernovae.
  • Xiaofeng Wang, Lifan Wang, Alexei V. Filippenko, Eddie Baron, Markus Kromer, Dennis Jack, Tianmeng Zhang, Greg Aldering, Pierre Antilogus, David Arnett, Dietrich Baade, Brian J. Barris, Stefano Benetti, Patrice Bouchet, Adam S. Burrows, Ramon Canal, Enrico Cappellaro, Raymond Carlberg, Elisa di Carlo, Peter Challis, Arlin Crotts, John I. Danziger, Massimo Della Valle, Michael Fink, Ryan J. Foley, Claes Fransson, Avishay Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Chris L. Gerardy, Gerson Goldhaber, Mario Hamuy, Wolfgang Hillebrandt, Peter A. Hoeflich, Stephen T. Holland, Daniel E. Holz, John P. Hughes, David J. Jeffery, Saurabh W. Jha, Dan Kasen, Alexei M. Khokhlov, Robert P. Kirshner, Robert Knop, Cecilia Kozma, Kevin Krisciunas, Brian C. Lee, Bruno Leibundgut, Eric J. Lentz, Douglas C. Leonard, Walter H. G. Lewin, Weidong Li, Mario Livio, Peter Lundqvist, Dan Maoz, Thomas Matheson, Paolo Mazzali, Peter Meikle, Gajus Miknaitis, Peter Milne, Stefan Mochnacki, Ken'Ichi Nomoto, Peter E. Nugent, Elaine Oran, Nino Panagia, Saul Perlmutter, Mark M. Phillips, Philip Pinto, Dovi Poznanski, Christopher J. Pritchet, Martin Reinecke, Adam Riess, Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, Richard Scalzo, Eric M. Schlegel, Brian Schmidt, James Siegrist, Alicia M. Soderberg, Jesper Sollerman, George Sonneborn, Anthony Spadafora, Jason Spyromilio, Richard A. Sramek, Sumner G. Starrfield, Louis G. Strolger, Nicholas B. Suntzeff, Rollin Thomas, John L. Tonry, Amedeo Tornambe, James W. Truran, Massimo Turatto, Michael Turner, Schuyler D. Van Dyk, Kurt Weiler, J. Craig Wheeler, Michael Wood-Vasey, Stan Woosley, Hitoshi Yamaoka
    Feb. 6, 2012 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.HE
    We present ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M, and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This dataset provides unique spectral time series down to 2000 Angstrom. Significant diversity is seen in the near maximum-light spectra (~ 2000--3500 Angstrom) for this small sample. The corresponding photometric data, together with archival data from Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope observations, provide further evidence of increased dispersion in the UV emission with respect to the optical. The peak luminosities measured in uvw1/F250W are found to correlate with the B-band light-curve shape parameter dm15(B), but with much larger scatter relative to the correlation in the broad-band B band (e.g., ~0.4 mag versus ~0.2 mag for those with 0.8 < dm15 < 1.7 mag). SN 2004dt is found as an outlier of this correlation (at > 3 sigma), being brighter than normal SNe Ia such as SN 2005cf by ~0.9 mag and ~2.0 mag in the uvw1/F250W and uvm2/F220W filters, respectively. We show that different progenitor metallicity or line-expansion velocities alone cannot explain such a large discrepancy. Viewing-angle effects, such as due to an asymmetric explosion, may have a significant influence on the flux emitted in the UV region. Detailed modeling is needed to disentangle and quantify the above effects.
  • Observational evidence for black hole spin down has been found in the normalized light curves of long GRBs in the BATSE catalogue. Over the duration $T_{90}$ of the burst, matter swept up by the central black hole is susceptible to non-axisymmetries producing gravitational radiation with a negative chirp. A time sliced matched filtering method is introduced to capture phase-coherence on intermediate timescales, $\tau$, here tested by injection of templates into experimental strain noise, $h_n(t)$. For TAMA 300, $h_n(f)\simeq 10^{-21}$ Hz$^{-\frac{1}{2}}$ at $f=1$ kHz gives a sensitivity distance for a reasonably accurate extraction of the trajectory in the time frequency domain of about $D\simeq 0.07-0.10$ Mpc for spin fown of black holes of mass $M=10-12M_\odot$ with $\tau=1$ s. Extrapolation to advanced detectors implies $D\simeq 35-50$ Mpc for $h_n(f)\simeq 2\times 10^{-24}$ Hz$^{-\frac{1}{2}}$ around 1 kHz, which will open a new window to rigorous calorimetry on Kerr black holes.
  • The Wide Field X-ray Telescope (WFXT) is a proposed mission with a high survey speed, due to the combination of large field of view (FOV) and effective area, i.e. grasp, and sharp PSF across the whole FOV. These characteristics make it suitable to detect a large number of variable and transient X-ray sources during its operating lifetime. Here we present estimates of the WFXT capabilities in the time domain, allowing to study the variability of thousand of AGNs with significant detail, as well as to constrain the rates and properties of hundreds of distant, faint and/or rare objects such as X-ray Flashes/faint GRBs, Tidal Disruption Events, ULXs, Type-I bursts etc. The planned WFXT extragalactic surveys will thus allow to trace variable and transient X-ray populations over large cosmological volumes.
  • The supernova (SN) delay-time distribution (DTD) - the SN rate versus time that would follow a brief burst of star formation - can shed light on SN progenitors, and on chemical enrichment timescales. Previous attempts to recover the DTD have used comparisons of mean SN rates vs. redshift to cosmic star-formation history (SFH), or comparison of SN rates among galaxies of different mean ages. We present an approach to recover the SN DTD that avoids such averaging. We compare the SFHs of individual galaxies to the numbers of SNe discovered in each galaxy (generally zero, sometimes one or a few SNe). We apply the method to a subsample of 3505 galaxies, hosting 82 SNe Ia and 119 core-collapse SNe (CC SNe), from the Lick Observatory SN Search (LOSS), with SFHs reconstructed from SDSS spectra. We find a >2sigma SN Ia DTD signal in our shortest-delay, "prompt", bin at <420 Myr. Despite a systematic error, due to the limited aperture of the SDSS spectroscopic fibres, which causes some of the prompt signal to leak to the later DTD bins, the data require prompt SNe Ia at the >99% confidence. We further find, at 4sigma, SNe Ia that are "delayed" by > 2.4 Gyr. Thus, the data support the existence of both prompt and delayed SNe Ia. The time integral over the CC SN DTD is 0.010+/-0.002 SNe per Msun, as expected if all stars of mass >8 Msun lead to visible SN explosions. This argues against a minimum mass for CC SNe of >10 Msun, and against a significant fraction of massive stars that collapse without exploding. For SNe Ia, the time-integrated DTD is 0.0023+/-0.0006 SNe per Msun formed, most of them with delays < 2.4 Gyr. We show, using simulations, that application of the method to the full existing LOSS sample, but with complete and unbiased SFH estimates for the survey galaxies, could provide a detailed measurement of the SN Ia DTD.
  • The time delay between the formation of a population of stars and the onset of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) sets important limits on the masses and nature of SN Ia progenitors. Here we use a new observational technique to measure this time delay by comparing the spatial distributions of SNe Ia to their local environments. Previous work attempted such analyses encompassing the entire host of each SN Ia, yielding inconclusive results. Our approach confines the analysis only to the relevant portions of the hosts, allowing us to show that even so-called "prompt" SNe Ia that trace star-formation on cosmic timescales exhibit a significant delay time of 200-500 million years. This implies that either the majority of Ia companion stars have main-sequence masses less than 3 solar masses, or that most SNe Ia arise from double-white dwarf binaries. Our results are also consistent with a SNe Ia rate that traces the white dwarf formation rate, scaled by a fixed efficiency factor.
  • We present optical spectroscopic and photometric observations of supernova (SN) 2008D, associated with the luminous X-ray transient 080109, at >300 days after the explosion (nebular phases). We also give flux measurements of emission lines from the H II region at the site of the SN, and estimates of the local metallicity. The brightness of the SN at nebular phases is consistent with the prediction of the explosion models with an ejected 56Ni mass of 0.07 Msun, which explains the light curve at early phases. The [O I] line in the nebular spectrum shows a double-peaked profile while the [Ca II] line does not. The double-peaked [O I] profile strongly indicates that SN 2008D is an aspherical explosion. The profile can be explained by a torus-like distribution of oxygen viewed from near the plane of the torus. We suggest that SN 2008D is a side-viewed, bipolar explosion with a viewing angle of > 50^{\circ} from the polar direction.
  • - Constraining the cosmological parameters and understanding Dark Energy have tremendous implications for the nature of the Universe and its physical laws. - The pervasive limit of systematic uncertainties reached by cosmography based on Cepheids and Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) warrants a search for complementary approaches. - Type II SNe have been shown to offer such a path. Their distances can be well constrained by luminosity-based or geometric methods. Competing, complementary, and concerted efforts are underway, to explore and exploit those objects that are extremely well matched to next generation facilities. Spectroscopic follow-up will be enabled by space- based and 20-40 meter class telescopes. - Some systematic uncertainties of Type II SNe, such as reddening by dust and metallicity effects, are bound to be different from those of SNe Ia. Their stellar progenitors are known, promising better leverage on cosmic evolution. In addition, their rate - which closely tracks the ongoing star formation rate - is expected to rise significantly with look- back time, ensuring an adequate supply of distant examples. - These data will competitively constrain the dark energy equation of state, allow the determination of the Hubble constant to 5%, and promote our understanding of the processes involved in the last dramatic phases of massive stellar evolution.
  • We carry out a comprehensive theoretical examination of the relationship between the spatial distribution of optical transients and the properties of their progenitor stars. By constructing analytic models of star-forming galaxies and the evolution of stellar populations within them, we are able to place constraints on candidate progenitors for core-collapse supernovae (SNe), long-duration gamma ray bursts, and supernovae Ia. In particular we first construct models of spiral galaxies that reproduce observations of core-collapse SNe, and we use these models to constrain the minimum mass for SNe Ic progenitors to approximately 25 solar masses. Secondly, we lay out the parameters of a dwarf irregular galaxy model, which we use to show that the progenitors of long-duration gamma-ray bursts are likely to have masses above approximately 43 solar masses. Finally, we introduce a new method for constraining the time scale associated with SNe Ia and apply it to our spiral galaxy models to show how observations can better be analyzed to discriminate between the leading progenitor models for these objects.
  • The only supernovae (SNe) to have shown early gamma-ray or X-ray emission thus far are overenergetic, broad-lined Type Ic SNe (Hypernovae - HNe). Recently, SN 2008D shows several novel features: (i) weak XRF, (ii) an early, narrow optical peak, (iii) disappearance of the broad lines typical of SNIc HNe, (iv) development of He lines as in SNeIb. Detailed analysis shows that SN 2008D was not a normal SN: its explosion energy (KE ~ 6*10^{51} erg) and ejected mass (~7 Msun) are intermediate between normal SNeIbc and HNe. We derive that SN 2008D was originally a ~30Msun star. When it collapsed a black hole formed and a weak, mildly relativistic jet was produced, which caused the XRF. SN 2008D is probably among the weakest explosions that produce relativistic jets. Inner engine activity appears to be present whenever massive stars collapse to black holes.