• In this paper, we prove convergence in distribution of Langevin processes in the overdamped asymptotics. The proof relies on the classical perturbed test function (or corrector) method, which is used both to show tightness in path space, and to identify the extracted limit with a martingale problem. The result holds assuming the continuity of the gradient of the potential energy, and a mild control of the initial kinetic energy.
  • Adaptive Multilevel Splitting (AMS for short) is a generic Monte Carlo method for Markov processes that simulates rare events and estimates associated probabilities. Despite its practical efficiency, there are almost no theoretical results on the convergence of this algorithm. The purpose of this paper is to prove both consistency and asymptotic normality results in a general setting. This is done by associating to the original Markov process a level-indexed process, also called a stochastic wave, and by showing that AMS can then be seen as a Fleming-Viot type particle system. This being done, we can finally apply general results on Fleming-Viot particle systems that we have recently obtained.
  • Fleming-Viot type particle systems represent a classical way to approximate the distribution of a Markov process with killing, given that it is still alive at a final deterministic time. In this context, each particle evolves independently according to the law of the underlying Markov process until its killing, and then branches instantaneously on another randomly chosen particle. While the consistency of this algorithm in the large population limit has been recently studied in several articles, our purpose here is to prove Central Limit Theorems under very general assumptions. For this, we only suppose that the particle system does not explode in finite time, and that the jump and killing times have atomless distributions. In particular, this includes the case of elliptic diffusions with hard killing.
  • The distribution of a Markov process with killing, conditioned to be still alive at a given time, can be approximated by a Fleming-Viot type particle system. In such a system, each particle is simulated independently according to the law of the underlying Markov process, and branches onto another particle at each killing time. The consistency of this method in the large population limit was the subject of several recent articles. In the present paper, we go one step forward and prove a central limit theorem for the law of the Fleming-Viot particle system at a given time under two conditions: a "soft killing" assumption and a boundedness condition involving the "carr\'e du champ" operator of the underlying Markov process.
  • This paper considers the space homogenous Boltzmann equation with Maxwell molecules and arbitrary angular distribution. Following Kac's program, emphasis is laid on the the associated conservative Kac's stochastic $N$-particle system, a Markov process with binary collisions conserving energy and total momentum. An explicit Markov coupling (a probabilistic, Markovian coupling of two copies of the process) is constructed, using simultaneous collisions, and parallel coupling of each binary random collision on the sphere of collisional directions. The euclidean distance between the two coupled systems is almost surely decreasing with respect to time, and the associated quadratic coupling creation (the time variation of the averaged squared coupling distance) is computed explicitly. Then, a family (indexed by $\delta > 0$) of $N$-uniform ''weak'' coupling / coupling creation inequalities are proven, that leads to a $N$-uniform power law trend to equilibrium of order ${\sim}_{ t \to + \infty} t^{-\delta} $, with constants depending on moments of the velocity distributions strictly greater than $2(1 + \delta)$. The case of order $4$ moment is treated explicitly, achieving Kac's program without any chaos propagation analysis. Finally, two counter-examples are suggested indicating that the method: (i) requires the dependance on $>2$-moments, and (ii) cannot provide contractivity in quadratic Wasserstein distance in any case.
  • This paper considers space homogenous Boltzmann kinetic equations in dimension $d$ with Maxwell collisions (and without Grad's cut-off). An explicit Markov coupling of the associated conservative (Nanbu) stochastic $N$-particle system is constructed, using plain parallel coupling of isotropic random walks on the sphere of two-body collisional directions. The resulting coupling is almost surely decreasing, and the $L_2$-coupling creation is computed explicitly. Some quasi-contractive and uniform in $N$ coupling / coupling creation inequalities are then proved, relying on $2+\alpha$-moments ($\alpha >0$) of velocity distributions; upon $N$-uniform propagation of moments of the particle system, it yields a $N$-scalable $\alpha$-power law trend to equilibrium. The latter are based on an original sharp inequality, which bounds from above the coupling distance of two centered and normalized random variables $(U,V)$ in $\R^d$, with the average square parallelogram area spanned by $(U-U_\ast,V-V_\ast)$, $(U_\ast,V_\ast)$ denoting an independent copy. Two counter-examples proving the necessity of the dependance on $>2$-moments and the impossibility of strict contractivity are provided. The paper, (mostly) self-contained, does not require any propagation of chaos property and uses only elementary tools.
  • This paper considers Schr\"odinger operators, and presents a probabilistic interpretation of the variation (or shape derivative) of the Dirichlet groundstate energy when the associated domain is perturbed. This interpretation relies on the distribution on the boundary of a stopped random process with Feynman-Kac weights. Practical computations require in addition the explicit approximation of the normal derivative of the groundstate on the boundary. We then propose to use this formulation in the case of the so-called fixed node approximation of fermion groundstates, defined by the bottom eigenelements of the Schr\"odinger operator of a fermionic system with Dirichlet conditions on the nodes (the set of zeros) of an initially guessed skew-symmetric function. We show that the shape derivative of the fixed node energy vanishes if and only if either (i) the distribution on the nodes of the stopped random process is symmetric; or (ii) the nodes are exactly the zeros of a skew-symmetric eigenfunction of the operator. We propose an approximation of the shape derivative of the fixed node energy that can be computed with a Monte-Carlo algorithm, which can be referred to as Nodal Monte-Carlo (NMC). The latter approximation of the shape derivative also vanishes if and only if either (i) or (ii) holds.
  • We discuss velocity-jump models for chemotaxis of bacteria with an internal state that allows the velocity jump rate to depend on the memory of the chemoattractant concentration along their path of motion. Using probabilistic techniques, we provide a pathwise result that shows that the considered process converges to an advection-diffusion process in the (long-time) diffusion limit. We also (re-)prove using the same approach that the same limiting equation arises for a related, simpler process with direct sensing of the chemoattractant gradient. Additionally, we propose a time discretization technique that retains these diffusion limits exactly, i.e., without error that depends on the time discretization. In the companion paper \cite{variance}, these results are used to construct a coupling technique that allows numerical simulation of the process with internal state with asymptotic variance reduction, in the sense that the variance vanishes in the diffusion limit.
  • We discuss variance reduced simulations for an individual-based model of chemotaxis of bacteria with internal dynamics. The variance reduction is achieved via a coupling of this model with a simpler process in which the internal dynamics has been replaced by a direct gradient sensing of the chemoattractants concentrations. In the companion paper \cite{limits}, we have rigorously shown, using a pathwise probabilistic technique, that both processes converge towards the same advection-diffusion process in the diffusive asymptotics. In this work, a direct coupling is achieved between paths of individual bacteria simulated by both models, by using the same sets of random numbers in both simulations. This coupling is used to construct a hybrid scheme with reduced variance. We first compute a deterministic solution of the kinetic density description of the direct gradient sensing model; the deviations due to the presence of internal dynamics are then evaluated via the coupled individual-based simulations. We show that the resulting variance reduction is \emph{asymptotic}, in the sense that, in the diffusive asymptotics, the difference between the two processes has a variance which vanishes according to the small parameter.
  • In this paper, we consider Langevin processes with mechanical constraints. The latter are a fundamental tool in molecular dynamics simulation for sampling purposes and for the computation of free energy differences. The results of this paper can be divided into three parts. (i) We propose a simple discretization of the constrained Langevin process based on a standard splitting strategy. We show how to correct the scheme so that it samples {\em exactly} the canonical measure restricted on a submanifold, using a Metropolis rule in the spirit of the Generalized Hybrid Monte Carlo (GHMC) algorithm. Moreover, we obtain, in some limiting regime, a consistent discretization of the overdamped Langevin (Brownian) dynamics on a submanifold, also sampling exactly the correct canonical measure with constraints. The corresponding numerical methods can be used to sample (without any bias) a probability measure supported by a submanifold. (ii) For free energy computation using thermodynamic integration, we rigorously prove that the longtime average of the Lagrange multipliers of the constrained Langevin dynamics yields the gradient of a rigid version of the free energy associated with the constraints. A second order time discretization using the Lagrange multipliers is proposed. (iii) The Jarzynski-Crooks fluctuation relation is proved for Langevin processes with mechanical constraints evolving in time. An original numerical discretization without time-step error is proposed. Numerical illustrations are provided for (ii) and (iii).
  • An implicit mass-matrix penalization (IMMP) of Hamiltonian dynamics is proposed, and associated dynamical integrators, as well as sampling Monte-Carlo schemes, are analyzed for systems with multiple time scales. The penalization is based on an extended Hamiltonian with artificial constraints associated with some selected DOFs. The penalty parameters enable arbitrary tuning of timescales for the selected DOFs. The IMMP dynamics is shown to be an interpolation between the exact Hamiltonian dynamics and the dynamics with rigid constraints. This property translates in the associated numerical integrator into a tunable trade-off between stability and dynamical modification. Moreover, a penalty that vanishes with the time-step yields order two convergent schemes for the exact dynamics. Moreover, by construction, the resulting dynamics preserves the canonical equilibrium distribution in position variables, up to a computable geometric correcting potential, leading to Metropolis-like unbiased sampling algorithms. The algorithms can be implemented with a simple modification of standard geometric integrators with algebraic constraints imposed on the selected DOFs, and has no additional complexity in terms of enforcing the constraints and force evaluations. The properties of the IMMP method are demonstrated numerically on the $N$-alkane model, showing that the time-step stability region of integrators and the sampling efficiency can be increased with a gain that grows with the size of the system. This feature is mathematically analyzed for a harmonic atomic chain model. When a large stiffness parameter is introduced, the IMMP method is shown to be asymptotically stable and to converge towards the heuristically expected Markovian effective dynamics on the slow manifold.
  • We propose and analyze an implicit mass-matrix penalization (IMMP) technique which enables efficient and exact sampling of the (Boltzmann/Gibbs) canonical distribution associated to Hamiltonian systems with fast degrees of freedom (fDOFs). The penalty parameters enable arbitrary tuning of the timescale for the selected fDOFs, and the method is interpreted as an interpolation between the exact Hamiltonian dynamics and the dynamics with infinitely slow fDOFs (equivalent to geometrically corrected rigid constraints). This property translates in the associated numerical methods into a tunable trade-off between stability and dynamical modification. The penalization is based on an extended Hamiltonian with artificial constraints associated with each fDOF. By construction, the resulting dynamics is statistically exact with respect to the canonical distribution in position variables. The algorithms can be easily implemented with standard geometric integrators with algebraic constraints given by the expected fDOFs, and has no additional complexity in terms of enforcing the constraint and force evaluations. The method is demonstrated on a high dimensional system with non-convex interactions. Prescribing the macroscopic dynamical timescale, it is shown that the IMMP method increases the time-step stability region with a gain that grows linearly with the size of the system. The latter property, as well as consistency of the macroscopic dynamics of the IMMP method is proved rigorously for linear interactions. Finally, when a large stiffness parameter is introduced, the IMMP method can be tuned to be asymptotically stable, converging towards the heuristically expected Markovian effective dynamics on the slow manifold.
  • We propose a proof of convergence of an adaptive method used in molecular dynamics to compute free energy profiles. Mathematically, it amounts to studying the long-time behavior of a stochastic process which satisfies a non-linear stochastic differential equation, where the drift depends on conditional expectations of some functionals of the process. We use entropy techniques to prove exponential convergence to the stationary state.
  • We propose a formulation of adaptive computation of free energy differences, in the ABF or nonequilibrium metadynamics spirit, using conditional distributions of samples of configurations which evolve in time. This allows to present a truly unifying framework for these methods, and to prove convergence results for certain classes of algorithms. From a numerical viewpoint, a parallel implementation of these methods is very natural, the replicas interacting through the reconstructed free energy. We show how to improve this parallel implementation by resorting to some selection mechanism on the replicas. This is illustrated by computations on a model system of conformational changes.
  • The computation of free energy differences through an exponential weighting of out of equilibrium paths (known as the Jarzynski equality) is often used for transitions between states described by an external parameter $\lambda$ in the Hamiltonian. We present here an extension to transitions between states defined by different values of some reaction coordinate, using a projected Brownian dynamics. In contrast with other approaches, we use a projection rather than a constraining potential to let the constraints associated with the reaction coordinate evolve. We show how to use the Lagrange multipliers associated with these constraints to compute the work associated with a given trajectory. Appropriate discretizations are proposed. Some numerical results demonstrate the applicability of the method for the computation of free energy difference profiles.
  • We present some applications of an Interacting Particle System (IPS) methodology to the field of Molecular Dynamics. This IPS method allows several simulations of a switched random process to keep closer to equilibrium at each time, thanks to a selection mechanism based on the relative virtual work induced on the system. It is therefore an efficient improvement of usual non-equilibrium simulations, which can be used to compute canonical averages, free energy differences, and typical transitions paths.
  • A hyperbolic semi-ideal polyedron is a polyedron whose vertices lie inside the hyperbolic space $\mathbf{H}^{3}$ or at infinity. A hyperideal polyedron is, in the projective model, the intersection of $\mathbf{H}^{3}$ with a projective polyhedron whose vertices all lie outside of $\mathbf{H}^{3}$, and whose edges all meet $\mathbf{H}^{3}$. We classify semi-ideal polyhedra in terms of their dual metric, using the results of Rivin and Hodgson in \cite{comp} et \cite{idea}. This result is used to obtain the classification of hyperideal polyhedra in terms of their combinatorial type and their dihedral angles. These two results are generalized to the case of fuchsian polyhedra.