• Stellar population and stellar kinematic studies provide unique but complementary insights into how galaxies build-up their stellar mass and angular momentum. A galaxy's mean stellar age reveals when stars were formed, but provides little constraint on how the galaxy's mass was assembled. Resolved stellar dynamics trace the change in angular momentum and orbital distribution of stars due to mergers, but major mergers tend to obscure the effect of earlier interactions. With the rise of large multi-object integral field spectroscopic (IFS) surveys, such as SAMI and MaNGA, and single-object IFS surveys (e.g., ATLAS$^{\rm{3D}}$, CALIFA, MASSIVE), it is now feasible to connect a galaxy's star formation and merger history on the same resolved physical scales, over a large range in galaxy mass, and across the full range of optical morphology and environment. Using the SAMI Galaxy Survey, here we present the first study of spatially-resolved stellar kinematics and global stellar populations in a large IFS galaxy survey. We find a strong correlation of stellar population age with location in the ($V / \sigma$, $\epsilon_{\rm{e}}$) diagram that links the ratio of ordered rotation to random motions in a galaxy to its observed ellipticity. For the large majority of galaxies that are oblate rotating spheroids, we find that characteristic stellar age follows the intrinsic ellipticity of galaxies remarkably well. This trend is still observed when galaxies are separated into early-type and late-type samples.
  • Taipan is a multi-object spectroscopic galaxy survey starting in 2017 that will cover 2pi steradians over the southern sky, and obtain optical spectra for about two million galaxies out to z<0.4. Taipan will use the newly-refurbished 1.2m UK Schmidt Telescope at Siding Spring Observatory with the new TAIPAN instrument, which includes an innovative 'Starbugs' positioning system capable of rapidly and simultaneously deploying up to 150 spectroscopic fibres (and up to 300 with a proposed upgrade) over the 6-deg diameter focal plane, and a purpose-built spectrograph operating from 370 to 870nm with resolving power R>2000. The main scientific goals of Taipan are: (i) to measure the distance scale of the Universe (primarily governed by the local expansion rate, H_0) to 1% precision, and the structure growth rate of structure to 5%; (ii) to make the most extensive map yet constructed of the mass distribution and motions in the local Universe, using peculiar velocities based on improved Fundamental Plane distances, which will enable sensitive tests of gravitational physics; and (iii) to deliver a legacy sample of low-redshift galaxies as a unique laboratory for studying galaxy evolution as a function of mass and environment. The final survey, which will be completed within 5 years, will consist of a complete magnitude-limited sample (i<17) of about 1.2x10^6 galaxies, supplemented by an extension to higher redshifts and fainter magnitudes (i<18.1) of a luminous red galaxy sample of about 0.8x10^6 galaxies. Observations and data processing will be carried out remotely and in a fully-automated way, using a purpose-built automated 'virtual observer' software and an automated data reduction pipeline. The Taipan survey is deliberately designed to maximise its legacy value, by complementing and enhancing current and planned surveys of the southern sky at wavelengths from the optical to the radio.
  • We present the ~800 star formation rate maps for the SAMI Galaxy Survey based on H{\alpha} emission maps, corrected for dust attenuation via the Balmer decrement, that are included in the SAMI Public Data Release 1. We mask out spaxels contaminated by non-stellar emission using the [O III]/H{\beta}, [N II]/H{\alpha}, [S II]/H{\alpha}, and [O I]/H{\alpha} line ratios. Using these maps, we examine the global and resolved star-forming main sequences of SAMI galaxies as a function of morphology, environmental density, and stellar mass. Galaxies further below the star-forming main sequence are more likely to have flatter star formation profiles. Early-type galaxies split into two populations with similar stellar masses and central stellar mass surface densities. The main sequence population has centrally-concentrated star formation similar to late-type galaxies, while galaxies >3{\sigma} below the main sequence show significantly reduced star formation most strikingly in the nuclear regions. The split populations support a two-step quenching mechanism, wherein halo mass first cuts off the gas supply and remaining gas continues to form stars until the local stellar mass surface density can stabilize the reduced remaining fuel against further star formation. Across all morphologies, galaxies in denser environments show a decreased specific star formation rate from the outside in, supporting an environmental cause for quenching, such as ram-pressure stripping or galaxy interactions.
  • In galaxy clusters, efficiently accreting active galactic nuclei (AGN) are preferentially located in the infall regions of the cluster projected phase-space, and are rarely found in the cluster core. This has been attributed to both an increase in triggering opportunities for infalling galaxies, and a reduction of those mechanisms in the hot, virialised, cluster core. Exploiting the depth and completeness ($98\,$per cent at $r<19.8\,$mag) of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey (GAMA), we probe down the group halo mass function to assess whether AGN are found in the same regions in groups as they are in clusters. We select 451 optical AGN from 7498 galaxies with $\log_{10}(M_*/\text{M}_\odot) > 9.9$ in 695 groups with $11.53\leq \log_{10}(M_{200}/\text{M}_\odot) \leq 14.56$ at $z<0.15$. By analysing the projected phase-space positions of these galaxies we demonstrate that when split both radially, and into physically derived infalling and core populations, AGN position within group projected phase-space is dependent on halo mass. For groups with $\log_{10}(M_{200}/\text{M}_\odot)>13.5$, AGN are preferentially found in the infalling galaxy population with $3.6\sigma$ confidence. At lower halo masses we observe no difference in AGN fraction between core and infalling galaxies. These observations support a model where a reduced number of low-speed interactions, ram pressure stripping and intra-group/cluster medium temperature, the dominance of which increase with halo mass, work to inhibit AGN in the cores of groups and clusters with $\log_{10}(M_{200}/\text{M}_\odot)>13.5$, but do not significantly affect nuclear activity in cores of less massive structures.
  • In this paper we test if nearby blue spheroid (BSphs) galaxies may become the progenitors of star-forming spiral galaxies or passively-evolving elliptical galaxies. Our sample comprises 428 galaxies of various morphologies in the redshift range 0.002<z<0.02 (8-87 Mpc) with panchromatic data from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey. We find that BSph galaxies are structurally (mean effective surface brightness, effective radius) very similar to their passively-evolving red counterparts. However, their star-formation and other properties such as colour, age and metallicity are more like star-forming spirals than spheroids (ellipticals and lenticulars). We show that BSph galaxies are statistically distinguishable from other spheroids as well as spirals in the multi-dimensional space mapped by luminosity-weighted age, metallicity, dust mass and specific star formation rate. We use HI data to reveal that some of the BSphs are (further) developing their disks, hence their blue colours. They may eventually become spiral galaxies --- if sufficient gas accretion occurs --- or more likely fade into low-mass red galaxies.
  • We model the triggering of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in galaxy clusters using the semi- analytic galaxy formation model SAGE (?). We prescribe triggering methods based on the ram pressure galaxies experience as they move throughout the intracluster medium, which is hypothesized to trigger star formation and AGN activity. The clustercentric radius and velocity distribution of the simulated active galaxies produced by these models are compared with that of AGN and galaxies with intense star formation from a sample of low-redshift, relaxed clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The ram pressure triggering model that best explains the clustercentric radius and velocity distribution of these observed galaxies has AGN and star formation triggered if $2.5\times10^{-14} < P_{ram} < 2.5\times10^{-13}$ Pa and $P_{ram} > 2P_{internal}$; this is consistent with expectations from hydrodynamical simulations of ram-pressure induced star formation. Our results show that ram pressure is likely to be an important mechanism for triggering star formation and AGN activity in clusters.
  • We present an analysis of the global stellar populations of galaxies in the SAMI Galaxy Survey. Our sample consists of 1319 galaxies spanning four orders of magnitude in stellar mass and includes all morphologies and environments. We derive luminosity-weighted, single stellar population equivalent stellar ages, metallicities and alpha enhancements from spectra integrated within one effective radius apertures. Variations in galaxy size explain the majority of the scatter in the age--mass and metallicity--mass relations. Stellar populations vary systematically in the plane of galaxy size and stellar mass, such that galaxies with high stellar surface mass density are older, more metal-rich and alpha-enhanced than less dense galaxies. Galaxies with high surface mass densities have a very narrow range of metallicities, however, at fixed mass, the spread in metallicity increases substantially with increasing galaxy size (decreasing density). We identify residual correlations with morphology and environment. At fixed mass and size, galaxies with late-type morphologies, small bulges and low Sersic n are younger than early-type, high n, high bulge-to-total galaxies. Age and metallicity both show small residual correlations with environment; at fixed mass and size, galaxies in denser environments or more massive halos are older and somewhat more metal rich than those in less dense environments. We connect these trends to evolutionary tracks within the size--mass plane.
  • We present the first major release of data from the SAMI Galaxy Survey. This data release focuses on the emission-line physics of galaxies. Data Release One includes data for 772 galaxies, about 20% of the full survey. Galaxies included have the redshift range 0.004 < z < 0.092, a large mass range (7.6 < log(Mstellar/M$_\odot$) < 11.6), and star-formation rates of 10^-4 to 10^1\ M$_\odot$/yr. For each galaxy, we include two spectral cubes and a set of spatially resolved 2D maps: single- and multi-component emission-line fits (with dust extinction corrections for strong lines), local dust extinction and star-formation rate. Calibration of the fibre throughputs, fluxes and differential-atmospheric-refraction has been improved over the Early Data Release. The data have average spatial resolution of 2.16 arcsec (FWHM) over the 15~arcsec diameter field of view and spectral (kinematic) resolution R=4263 (sigma=30km/s) around Halpha. The relative flux calibration is better than 5\% and absolute flux calibration better than $\pm0.22$~mag, with the latter estimate limited by galaxy photometry. The data are presented online through the Australian Astronomical Observatory's Data Central.
  • The fraction of galaxies supported by internal rotation compared to galaxies stabilized by internal pressure provides a strong constraint on galaxy formation models. In integral field spectroscopy surveys, this fraction is biased because survey instruments typically only trace the inner parts of the most massive galaxies. We present aperture corrections for the two most widely used stellar kinematic quantities $V/\sigma$ and $\lambda_{R}$. Our demonstration involves integral field data from the SAMI Galaxy Survey and the ATLAS$^{\rm{3D}}$ Survey. We find a tight relation for both $V/\sigma$ and $\lambda_{R}$ when measured in different apertures that can be used as a linear transformation as a function of radius, i.e., a first-order aperture correction. We find that $V/\sigma$ and $\lambda_{R}$ radial growth curves are well approximated by second order polynomials. By only fitting the inner profile (0.5$R_{\rm{e}}$), we successfully recover the profile out to one $R_{\rm{e}}$ if a constraint between the linear and quadratic parameter in the fit is applied. However, the aperture corrections for $V/\sigma$ and $\lambda_{R}$ derived by extrapolating the profiles perform as well as applying a first-order correction. With our aperture-corrected $\lambda_{R}$ measurements, we find that the fraction of slow rotating galaxies increases with stellar mass. For galaxies with $\log M_{*}/M_{\odot}>$ 11, the fraction of slow rotators is $35.9\pm4.3$ percent, but is underestimated if galaxies without coverage beyond one $R_{\rm{e}}$ are not included in the sample ($24.2\pm5.3$ percent). With measurements out to the largest aperture radius the slow rotator fraction is similar as compared to using aperture corrected values ($38.3\pm4.4$ percent). Thus, aperture effects can significantly bias stellar kinematic IFS studies, but this bias can now be removed with the method outlined here.
  • We investigate the energy sources of random turbulent motions of ionised gas from H$\alpha$ emission in eight local star-forming galaxies from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. These galaxies satisfy strict pure star-forming selection criteria to avoid contamination from active galactic nuclei (AGN) or strong shocks/outflows. Using the relatively high spatial and spectral resolution of SAMI, we find that -- on sub-kpc scales our galaxies display a flat distribution of ionised gas velocity dispersion as a function of star formation rate (SFR) surface density. A major fraction of our SAMI galaxies shows higher velocity dispersion than predictions by feedback-driven models, especially at the low SFR surface density end. Our results suggest that additional sources beyond star formation feedback contribute to driving random motions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in star-forming galaxies. We speculate that gravity, galactic shear, and/or magnetorotational instability (MRI) may be additional driving sources of turbulence in these galaxies.
  • We examine the kinematic morphology of early-type galaxies (ETGs) in eight galaxy clusters in the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. The clusters cover a mass range of 14.2<log(M_200/M_odot)<15.2 and we measure spatially-resolved stellar kinematics for 315 member galaxies with stellar masses 10.0<log(M_*/M_odot)<11.7 within 1R_200 of the cluster centers. We calculate the spin parameter, lambda_R and use that to classify the kinematic morphology of the galaxies as fast or slow rotators. The total fraction of slow rotators in the early-type galaxy population, F_SR=0.14+/-0.02 and does not depend on host cluster mass. Across the eight clusters, the fraction of slow rotators increases with increasing local overdensity. We also find that the slow-rotator fraction increases at small clustercentric radii (R_cl<0.3R_200), and note that there is also an increase in slow-rotator fraction at R_cl~0.6R_200. The slow rotators at these larger radii reside in cluster substructure. We find the strongest increase in slow-rotator fraction occurs with increasing stellar mass. After accounting for the strong correlation with stellar mass, we find no significant relationship between spin parameter and local overdensity in the cluster environment. We conclude that the primary driver for the kinematic morphology--density relationship in galaxy clusters is the changing distribution of galaxy stellar mass with local environment. The presence of slow rotators in substructure suggests that the cluster kinematic morphology--density relationship is a result of mass segregation of slow-rotating galaxies forming in groups that later merge with clusters and sink to the cluster center via dynamical friction.
  • Recent cosmological hydrodynamical simulations suggest that integral field spectroscopy can connect the high-order stellar kinematic moments h3 (~skewness) and h4 (~kurtosis) in galaxies to their cosmological assembly history. Here, we assess these results by measuring the stellar kinematics on a sample of 315 galaxies, without a morphological selection, using 2D integral field data from the SAMI Galaxy Survey. A proxy for the spin parameter ($\lambda_{R_e}$) and ellipticity ($\epsilon_e$) are used to separate fast and slow rotators; there exists a good correspondence to regular and non-regular rotators, respectively, as also seen in earlier studies. We confirm that regular rotators show a strong h3 versus $V/\sigma$ anti-correlation, whereas quasi-regular and non-regular rotators show a more vertical relation in h3 and $V/\sigma$. Motivated by recent cosmological simulations, we develop an alternative approach to kinematically classify galaxies from their individual h3 versus $V/\sigma$ signatures. We identify five classes of high-order stellar kinematic signatures using Gaussian mixture models. Class 1 corresponds to slow rotators, whereas Classes 2-5 correspond to fast rotators. We find that galaxies with similar $\lambda_{R_e}-\epsilon_e$ values can show distinctly different h3-$V/\sigma$ signatures. Class 5 objects are previously unidentified fast rotators that show a weak h3 versus $V/\sigma$ anti-correlation. These objects are predicted to be disk-less galaxies formed by gas-poor mergers. From morphological examination, however, there is evidence for large stellar disks. Instead, Class 5 objects are more likely disturbed galaxies, have counter-rotating bulges, or bars in edge-on galaxies. Finally, we interpret the strong anti-correlation in h3 versus $V/\sigma$ as evidence for disks in most fast rotators, suggesting a dearth of gas-poor mergers among fast rotators.
  • There exist conflicting observations on whether or not the environment of broad and narrow line AGN differ and this consequently questions the validity of the AGN unification model. The high spectroscopic completeness of the GAMA survey makes it ideal for a comprehensive analysis of the close environment of galaxies. To exploit this, and conduct a comparative analysis of the environment of broad and narrow line AGN within GAMA, we use a double-Gaussian emission line fitting method to model the more complex line profiles associated with broad line AGN. We select 209 type 1 (i.e., unobscured), 464 type 1.5-1.9 (partially obscured), and 281 type 2 (obscured) AGN within the GAMA II database. Comparing the fractions of these with neighbouring galaxies out to a pair separation of $350\,\text{kpc }h^{-1}$ and $\Delta z < 0.012$ shows no difference between AGN of different type, except at separations less than $20\,\text{kpc }h^{-1}$ where our observations suggest an excess of type 2 AGN in close pairs. We analyse the properties of the galaxies neighbouring our AGN and find no significant differences in colour or the star formation activity of these galaxies. Further to this we find that $\Sigma_5$ is also consistent between broad and narrow line AGN. We conclude that the observations presented here are consistent with AGN unification.
  • Galaxy mergers are important events that can determine the fate of a galaxy by changing its morphology, star-formation activity and mass growth. Merger systems have commonly been identified from their disturbed morphologies, and we now can employ Integral Field Spectroscopy to detect and analyze the impact of mergers on stellar kinematics as well. We visually classified galaxy morphology using deep images ($\mu_{\rm r} = 28\,\rm mag\,\, arcsec^{-2}$) taken by the Blanco 4-m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. In this paper we investigate 63 bright ($M_{\rm r}<-19.3$) spectroscopically-selected galaxies in Abell 119; of which 53 are early type and 20 galaxies show a disturbed morphology by visual inspection. A misalignment between the major axes in the photometric image and the kinematic map is conspicuous in morphologically-disturbed galaxies. Our sample is dominated by early-type galaxies, yet it shows a surprisingly tight Tully-Fisher relation except for the morphologically-disturbed galaxies which show large deviations. Three out of the eight slow rotators in our sample are morphology disturbed. The visually-selected morphologically-disturbed galaxies are generally more asymmetric, visually as well as kinematically. Our findings suggest that galaxy interactions, including mergers and perhaps fly-bys, play an important role in determining the orientation and magnitude of galaxy's angular momentum.
  • We investigate a sample of 40 local, main-sequence, edge-on disc galaxies using integral field spectroscopy with the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey to understand the link between properties of the extraplanar gas and their host galaxies. The kinematics properties of the extraplanar gas, including velocity asymmetries and increased dispersion, are used to differentiate galaxies hosting large-scale galactic winds from those dominated by the extended diffuse ionized gas. We find rather that a spectrum of diffuse gas-dominated to wind dominated galaxies exist. The wind-dominated galaxies span a wide range of star formation rates ($-1 \lesssim \log({\rm SFR/M_{\odot} yr^{-1}}) \lesssim 0.5$) across the whole stellar mass range of the sample ($8.5 \lesssim \log({\rm M_{*}/M_{\odot}}) \lesssim 11$). The wind galaxies also span a wide range in SFR surface densities ($10^{-3} \textrm{--} 10^{-1.5}\rm~M_{\odot} ~yr^{-1}~kpc^{-2}$) that is much lower than the canonical threshold of $\rm0.1~M_{\odot} ~yr^{-1}~kpc^{-2}$. The wind galaxies on average have higher SFR surface densities and higher $\rm H\delta_A$ values than those without strong wind signatures. The enhanced $\rm H\delta_A$ indicates that bursts of star formation in the recent past are necessary for driving large-scale galactic winds. We demonstrate with Sloan Digital Sky Survey data that galaxies with high SFR surface density have experienced bursts of star formation in the recent past. Our results imply that the galactic winds revealed in our study are indeed driven by bursts of star formation, and thus probing star formation in the time domain is crucial for finding and understanding galactic winds.
  • Using new integral field observations of 106 galaxies in three nearby clusters we investigate how the intrinsic scatter of the Fundamental Plane depends on the way in which the velocity dispersion and effective radius are measured. Our spatially resolved spectroscopy, combined with a cluster sample with negligible relative distance errors allows us to derive a Fundamental Plane with minimal systematic uncertainties. From the apertures we tested, we find that velocity dispersions measured within a circular aperture with radius equal to one effective radius minimises the intrinsic scatter of the Fundamental Plane. Using simple yet powerful Jeans dynamical models we determine dynamical masses for our galaxies. Replacing luminosity in the Fundamental Plane with dynamical mass, we demonstrate that the resulting Mass Plane has further reduced scatter, consistent with zero intrinsic scatter. Using these dynamical models we also find evidence for a possibly non-linear relationship between dynamical mass-to-light ratio and velocity dispersion.
  • We demonstrate the feasibility and potential of using large integral field spectroscopic surveys to investigate the prevalence of galactic-scale outflows in the local Universe. Using integral field data from SAMI and the Wide Field Spectrograph, we study the nature of an isolated disk galaxy, SDSS J090005.05+000446.7 (z = 0.05386). In the integral field datasets, the galaxy presents skewed line profiles changing with position in the galaxy. The skewed line profiles are caused by different kinematic components overlapping in the line-of-sight direction. We perform spectral decomposition to separate the line profiles in each spatial pixel as combinations of (1) a narrow kinematic component consistent with HII regions, (2) a broad kinematic component consistent with shock excitation, and (3) an intermediate component consistent with shock excitation and photoionisation mixing. The three kinematic components have distinctly different velocity fields, velocity dispersions, line ratios, and electron densities. We model the line ratios, velocity dispersions, and electron densities with our MAPPINGS IV shock and photoionisation models, and we reach remarkable agreement between the data and the models. The models demonstrate that the different emission line properties are caused by major galactic outflows that introduce shock excitation in addition to photoionisation by star-forming activities. Interstellar shocks embedded in the outflows shock-excite and compress the gas, causing the elevated line ratios, velocity dispersions, and electron densities observed in the broad kinematic component. We argue from energy considerations that, with the lack of a powerful active galactic nucleus, the outflows are likely to be driven by starburst activities. Our results set a benchmark of the type of analysis that can be achieved by the SAMI Galaxy Survey on large numbers of galaxies.
  • We examine the kinematic morphology of early-type galaxies (ETGs) in three galaxy clusters Abell 85, 168 and 2399. Using data from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) we measured spatially-resolved kinematics for 79 ETGs in these clusters. We calculate $\lambda_{R}$, a proxy for the projected specific stellar angular momentum, for each galaxy and classify the 79 ETGs in our samples as fast or slow rotators. We calculate the fraction of slow rotators in the ETG populations ($f_{SR}$) of the clusters to be $0.21\pm0.08$, $0.08\pm0.08$ and $0.12\pm0.06$ for Abell 85, 168 and 2399 respectively, with an overall fraction of $0.15\pm0.04$. These numbers are broadly consistent with the values found in the literature, confirming recent work asserting that the fraction of slow rotators in the ETG population is constant across many orders of magnitude in global environment. We examine the distribution of kinematic classes in each cluster as a function of environment using the projected density of galaxies: the kinematic morphology-density relation. We find that in Abell 85 $f_{SR}$ increases in higher density regions but in Abell 168 and Abell 2399 this trend is not seen. We examine the differences between the individual clusters to explain this. In addition, we find slow rotators on the outskirts of two of the clusters studied, Abell 85 and 2399. These galaxies reside in intermediate to low density regions and have clearly not formed at the centre of a cluster environment. We hypothesise that they formed at the centres of groups and are falling into the clusters for the first time.
  • We present a $250\,$ks Chandra observation of the cluster merger A2034 with the aim of understanding the nature of a sharp edge previously characterized as a cold front. The new data reveal that the edge is coherent over a larger opening angle and is significantly more bow-shock-shaped than previously thought. Within $\sim 27\,$degrees about the axis of symmetry of the edge the density, temperature and pressure drop abruptly by factors of $1.83^{+0.09}_{-0.08}$, $1.85^{+0.41}_{-0.41}$ and $3.4^{+0.8}_{-0.7}$, respectively. This is inconsistent with the pressure equilibrium expected of a cold front and we conclude that the edge is a shock front. We measure a Mach number $M = 1.59^{+0.06}_{-0.07}$ and corresponding shock velocity $v_{\rm shock}\simeq 2057\,$km/s. Using spectra collected at the MMT with the Hectospec multi-object spectrograph we identify 328 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. Significantly, we find a local peak in the projected galaxy density associated with a bright cluster galaxy which is located just ahead of the nose of the shock. The data are consistent with a merger viewed within $\sim 23\,$degrees of the plane of the sky. The merging subclusters are now moving apart along a north-south axis approximately $0.3\,$Gyr after a small impact parameter core passage. The gas core of the secondary subcluster, which was driving the shock, appears to have been disrupted by the merger. Without a driving 'piston' we speculate that the shock is dying. Finally, we propose that the diffuse radio emission near the shock is due to the revival of pre-existing radio plasma which has been overrun by the shock.
  • We identify four rare "jellyfish" galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in-situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst and AGN features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near ICM features associated with a merging "Bullet-like" subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.
  • We have selected a sample of local E+A galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 for follow up integral field spectroscopy with the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) on the ANU 2.3-m telescope. The sample was selected using the Halpha line in place of the [OII]3727 line as the indicator of on-going star formation (or lack thereof). This allowed us to select a lower redshift sample of galaxies than available in the literature since the [OII]3727 falls off the blue end of the wavelength coverage in the SDSS for the very lowest redshift objects. This low redshift selection means that the galaxies have a large angular to physical scale which allows us to resolve the central ~1kpc region of the galaxies; the region where stellar population gradients are expected. Such observations have been difficult to make using other higher redshift samples because even at redshifts z~0.1 the angular to physical scale is similar to the resolution provided by ground based seeing. Our integral field spectroscopy has enabled us to make the first robust detections of Balmer line gradients in the centres of E+A galaxies. Six out of our sample of seven, and all the galaxies with regular morphologies, are observed to have compact and centrally-concentrated Balmer line absorption. This is evidence for compact young cores and stellar population gradients which are predicted from models of mergers and tidal interactions which funnel gas into the galaxy core. Given the generally isolated nature of our sample this argues for the galaxies being seen in the late stage of a merger where the progenitors have already coalesced.
  • New Chandra X-ray data and extensive optical spectroscopy, obtained with AAOmega on the 3.9 m Anglo-Australian Telescope, are used to study the complex merger taking place in the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Combining our spectra with data from the literature provides a catalog of 1237 redshifts for extragalactic objects lying within 15' of the cluster center. From these, we confirm 343 cluster members projected within 3 Mpc of the cluster center. Combining positions and velocities, we identify two major substructures, corresponding to the remnants of two major subclusters. The new data are consistent with a post core passage, major merger taking place along an axis that is tilted well out of the plane of the sky, together with an interloping minor merger. Supporting this interpretation, the new X-ray data reveal enriched, low entropy gas from the core of the approaching, major subcluster, lying ~2' north of the cluster center, and a shock front to the southeast of the previously known bright, compact core associated with the receding subcluster. The X-ray morphology of the compact core is consistent with a Bullet-like cluster viewed from within ~45 degrees of the merger axis. An X-ray peak ~3' northwest of the cluster center, with an associated cold front to the northeast and a trail of low entropy gas to the south, is interpreted as the remnant of an interloping minor merger taking place roughly in the plane of the sky. We infer approximate paths for the three merging components.
  • We propose that synchronized triggering of star formation in gas-rich galaxies is possible during major mergers of cluster of galaxies, based on new numerical simulations of the time evolution of the physical properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) during such a merger event. Our numerical simulations show that the external pressure of the ICM in which cluster member galaxies are embedded, can increase significantly during cluster merging. As such, efficient star formation can be triggered in gas-rich members as a result of the strong compression of their cold gas by the increased pressure. We also suggest that these star-forming galaxies can subsequently be transformed into poststarburst galaxies, with their spatial distribution within the cluster being different to the rest of its population. We discuss whether this possible merger-induced enhancement in the number of star-forming and post-star-forming cluster galaxies is consistent with the observed evolution of galaxies in merging clusters.
  • This paper presents a sample of "cold front" clusters selected from the Chandra archive. The clusters are selected based purely on the existence of surface brightness edges in their Chandra images which are modeled as density jumps. A combination of the derived density and temperature jumps across the fronts is used to select nine robust examples of cold front clusters: 1ES0657-558, Abell 1201, Abell 1758N, MS1455.0+2232, Abell 2069, Abell 2142, Abell 2163, RXJ1720.1+2638, and Abell 3667. This sample is the subject of an ongoing study aimed at relating cold fronts to cluster merger activity, and understanding how the merging environment affects the cluster constituents. Here, temperature maps are presented along with the Chandra X-ray images. A dichotomy is found in the sample in that there exists a subsample of cold front clusters which are clearly mergers based on their X-ray morphologies, and a second subsample which harbor cold fronts, but have surprisingly relaxed X-ray morphologies, and minimal evidence for merger activity at other wavelengths. For this second subsample, the existence of a cold front provides the sole evidence for merger activity at X-ray wavelengths. We discuss how cold fronts can provide additional information which may be used to constrain merger histories, and also the possibility of using cold fronts to distinguish major and minor mergers.
  • We present evidence for the existence of significant substructure in the cold front cluster Abell 3667 based on multi-object spectroscopy taken with the 3.9m Anglo Australian Telescope. This paper is the second in a series analyzing the relationship between cold fronts observed in Chandra X-ray images and merger activity observed at optical wavelengths. We have obtained 910 galaxy redshifts in the field of Abell 3667 out to 3.5 Mpc, of which 550 are confirmed cluster members, more than doubling the number of spectroscopically confirmed members previously available and probing some 3 mag down the luminosity function. From this sample, we derive a cluster redshift of z=0.0553 +/-0.0002 and velocity dispersion of 1056 +/- 38 km/s and use a number of statistical tests to search for substructure. We find significant evidence for substructure in the spatial distribution of member galaxies and also in the localized velocity distributions and, in spite of this evidence, find the global velocity distribution does not deviate significantly from a Gaussian. Using combined spatial and velocity information, we find the cluster can be separated into two major structures, with roughly equal velocity dispersions, but offset in peculiar velocity from each other by ~500 km/s, and a number of minor substructures. We propose two scenarios which explain the radio and X-ray observations. Our data show the cold front is directly related to cluster merger activity, and also highlights the extent of optical data required to unambiguously detect the presence of substructure.