• We perform a complete study of the gravitational lensing effect beyond the Born approximation on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies using a multiple-lens raytracing technique through cosmological N-body simulations of the DEMNUni suite. The impact of second order effects accounting for the non-linear evolution of large-scale structures is evaluated propagating for the first time the full CMB lensing jacobian together with the light rays trajectory. We carefully investigate the robustness of our approach against several numerical effects in the raytracing procedure and in the N-body simulation itself, and find no evidence of large contaminations. We discuss the impact of beyond-Born corrections on lensed CMB observables, and compare our results with recent analytical predictions that appeared in the literature, finding a good agreement, and extend these results to smaller angular scales. We measure the gravitationally-induced CMB polarization rotation that appears at second order, and compare this result with the latest analytical predictions. We then present the detection prospect of beyond-Born effects with the future CMB-S4 experiment. We show that corrections to the temperature power spectrum can be measured only if a good control of the extragalactic foregrounds is achieved. Conversely, the beyond-Born corrections on E and B-modes power spectra will be much more difficult to detect.
  • We present an improved and extended analysis of the cross-correlation between the map of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) lensing potential derived from the \emph{Planck} mission data and the high-redshift galaxies detected by the \emph{Herschel} Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) in the photometric redshift range $z_{\rm ph} \ge 1.5$. We compare the results based on the 2013 and 2015 \textit{Planck} datasets, and investigate the impact of different selections of the H-ATLAS galaxy samples. Significant improvements over our previous analysis have been achieved thanks to the higher signal-to-noise ratio of the new CMB lensing map recently released by the \textit{Planck} collaboration. The effective galaxy bias parameter, $b$, for the full galaxy sample, derived from a joint analysis of the cross-power spectrum and of the galaxy auto-power spectrum is found to be $b = 3.54^{+0.15}_{-0.14}$. Furthermore, a first tomographic analysis of the cross-correlation signal is implemented, by splitting the galaxy sample into two redshift intervals: $1.5 \le z_{\rm ph} < 2.1$ and $z_{\rm ph}\ge 2.1$. A statistically significant signal was found for both bins, indicating a substantial increase with redshift of the bias parameter: $b=2.89\pm0.23$ for the lower and $b=4.75^{+0.24}_{-0.25}$ for the higher redshift bin. Consistently with our previous analysis we find that the amplitude of the cross correlation signal is a factor of $1.45^{+0.14}_{-0.13}$ higher than expected from the standard $\Lambda$CDM model for the assumed redshift distribution. The robustness of our results against possible systematic effects has been extensively discussed although the tension is mitigated by passing from 4 to 3$\sigma$.
  • We study the gravitational lensing effect on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies performing a ray-tracing of the primordial CMB photons through intervening large-scale structures (LSS) distribution predicted by N-Body numerical simulations with a particular focus on the precise recovery of the lens-induced polarized counterpart of the source plane. We apply both a multiple plane ray-tracing and an effective deflection approach based on the Born approximation to deflect the CMB photons trajectories through the simulated lightcone. We discuss the results obtained with both these methods together with the impact of LSS non-linear evolution on the CMB temperature and polarization power spectra. We compare our results with semi-analytical approximations implemented in Boltzmann codes like, e.g., CAMB. We show that, with our current N-body setup, the predicted lensing power is recovered with good accuracy in a wide range of multipoles while excess power with respect to semi-analytic prescriptions is observed in the lensing potential on scales $\ell \gtrsim 3000$. We quantify the impact of the numerical effects connected to the resolution in the N-Body simulation together with the resolution and band-limit chosen to synthesise the CMB source plane. We found these quantities to be particularly important for the simulation of B-mode polarization power spectrum.
  • We present results from high--resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of a Milky--Way-sized halo, aimed at studying the effect of feedback on the nature of gas accretion. Simulations include a model of inter-stellar medium and star formation, in which SN explosions provide effective thermal feedback. We distinguish between gas accretion onto the halo, which occurs when gas particles cross the halo virial radius, and gas accretion onto the central galaxy, which takes place when gas particles cross the inner one-tenth of the virial radius. Gas particles can be accreted through three different channels, depending on the maximum temperature value, $T_{\rm max}$, reached during the particles' past evolution: a cold channel for $T_{\rm max}<2.5 \times 10^5$ K, a hot one for $T>10^6$K, and a warm one for intermediate values of $T_{\rm max}$. We find that the warm channel is at least as important as the cold one for gas accretion onto the central galaxy. This result is at variance with previous findings that the cold mode dominates gas accretion at high redshift. We ascribe this difference to the different supernova feedback scheme implemented in our simulations. While results presented so far in the literature are based on uneffective SN thermal feedback schemes and/or the presence of a kinetic feedback, our simulations include only effective thermal feedback. We argue that observational detections of a warm accretion mode in the high--redshift circum-galactic medium would provide useful constraints on the nature of the feedback that regulates star formation in galaxies.