• We present the detection of very extended stellar populations around the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) out to R~21 degrees, or ~18.5 kpc at the LMC distance of 50 kpc, as detected in the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) performed with the Dark Energy Camera on the NOAO Blanco 4m Telescope. The deep (g~24) SMASH color magnitude diagrams (CMDs) clearly reveal old (~9 Gyr), metal-poor ([Fe/H]=-0.8 dex) main-sequence stars at a distance of 50 kpc. The surface brightness of these detections is extremely low with our most distant detection having 34 mag per arcsec squared in g-band. The SMASH radial density profile breaks from the inner LMC exponential decline at ~13-15 degrees and a second component at larger radii has a shallower slope with power-law index of -2.2 that contributes ~0.4% of the LMC's total stellar mass. In addition, the SMASH densities exhibit large scatter around our best-fit model of ~70% indicating that the envelope of stellar material in the LMC periphery is highly disturbed. We also use data from the NOAO Source catalog to map the LMC main-sequence populations at intermediate radii and detect a steep dropoff in density on the eastern side of the LMC (at R~8 deg) as well as an extended structure to the far northeast. These combined results confirm the existence of a very extended, low-density envelope of stellar material with disturbed shape around the LMC. The exact origin of this structure remains unclear but the leading options include a classical accreted halo or tidally stripped outer disk material.
  • We explore the stellar structure of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) disk using data from the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) and the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We detect a ring-like stellar overdensity in the red clump star count map at a radius of ~6 degrees (~5.2kpc at the LMC distance) that is continuous over ~270 degrees in position angle and is only limited by the current data coverage. The overdensity is clearly continuous in the southern disk, as covered by the SMASH survey, with an amplitude up to 2.5 times higher than that of the underlying smooth disk. This structure might be related to the multiple arms found by de Vaucouleurs (1955). We find that the overdensity shows spatial correlation with intermediate-age star clusters, but not with young (< 1Gyr) main sequence stars, indicating the stellar populations associated with the overdensity are intermediate in age or older. This suggests that either (1) the overdensity formed out of an asymmetric one-armed spiral wrapping around the LMC main body, which is induced by repeated encounters with the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) over the last Gyr, or (2) the overdensity formed very recently as a tidal response to a direct collision with the SMC. Both scenarios suggest that the ring-like overdensity is likely a product of tidal interaction with the SMC, but not with the Milky Way halo.
  • Photometric and spectroscopic observations of the Carina dSph revealed that this galaxy contains two dominant stellar populations of different age and kinematics. The co-existence of multiple populations provides new constraints on the dark halo structure of the galaxy, because different populations should be in equilibrium in the same dark matter potential well. We develop non-spherical dynamical models including such multiple stellar components and attempt to constrain the properties of the non-spherical dark halo of Carina. We find that Carina probably has a larger and denser dark halo than found in previous works and a less cuspy inner dark matter density profile, even though the uncertainties of dark halo parameters are still large due to small volume of data sample. Using our fitting results, we evaluate astrophysical factors for dark matter annihilation and decay and find that Carina should be one of the most promising detectable targets among classical dSph galaxies. We also calculate stellar velocity anisotropy profiles for both stellar populations and find that they are both radially anisotropic in the inner regions, while in the outer regions the older population becomes more tangentially biased than the intermediate one. This is consistent with the anisotropy predicted from tidal effects on the dynamical structure of a satellite galaxy and thereby can be considered as kinematic evidence for the tidal evolution of Carina.
  • In this paper we describe the photometric and spectroscopic properties of multiple populations in seven northern globular clusters. In this study we employ precise ground based photometry from the private collection of Stetson, space photometry from the Hubble Space Telescope, literature abundances of Na and O, and APOGEE survey abundances for Mg, Al, C, and N. Multiple populations are identified by their position in the CU,B,I -V pseudo-CMD and confirmed with their chemical composition determined using abundances. We confirm the expectation from previous studies that the RGB in all seven clusters are split and the different branches have different chemical compositions. The Mg-Al anti-correlations were well explored by the APOGEE and Gaia-ESO surveys for most globular clusters, some clusters showing bimodal distributions, while others continuous distributions. Even though the structure (i.e., bimodal vs. continuous) of Mg-Al can greatly vary, the Al-rich and Al-poor populations do not seem to have very different photometric properties, agreeing with theoretical calculations. There is no one-to-one correspondence between the Mg-Al anticorrelation shape (bimodal vs. continuous) and the structure of the RGB seen in the HST pseudo-CMDs, with the HST photometric information usually implying more complex formation/evolution histories than the spectroscopic ones. We report on finding two second generation HB stars in M5, and five second generation AGB stars in M92, which is the most metal-poor cluster to date in which second generation AGB stars have been observed.
  • The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) are unique local laboratories for studying the formation and evolution of small galaxies in exquisite detail. The Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) is an NOAO community DECam survey of the Clouds mapping 480 square degrees (distributed over ~2400 square degrees at ~20% filling factor) to ~24th mag in ugriz with the goal of identifying broadly distributed, low surface brightness stellar populations associated with the stellar halos and tidal debris of the Clouds. SMASH will also derive spatially-resolved star formation histories covering all ages out to large radii from the MCs that will further complement our understanding of their formation. Here, we present a summary of the survey, its data reduction, and a description of the first public Data Release (DR1). The SMASH DECam data have been reduced with a combination of the NOAO Community Pipeline, PHOTRED, an automated PSF photometry pipeline based mainly on the DAOPHOT suite, and custom calibration software. The attained astrometric precision is ~15 mas and the accuracy is ~2 mas with respect to the Gaia DR1 astrometric reference frame. The photometric precision is ~0.5-0.7% in griz and ~1% in u with a calibration accuracy of ~1.3% in all bands. The median 5 sigma point source depths in ugriz bands are 23.9, 24.8, 24.5, 24.2, 23.5 mag. The SMASH data already have been used to discover the Hydra II Milky Way satellite, the SMASH 1 old globular cluster likely associated with the LMC, and very extended stellar populations around the LMC out to R~18.4 kpc. SMASH DR1 contains measurements of ~100 million objects distributed in 61 fields. A prototype version of the NOAO Data Lab provides data access, including a data discovery tool, SMASH database access, an image cutout service, and a Jupyter notebook server with example notebooks for exploratory analysis.
  • Accurate astronomical distance determination is crucial for all fields in astrophysics, from Galactic to cosmological scales. Despite, or perhaps because of, significant efforts to determine accurate distances, using a wide range of methods, tracers, and techniques, an internally consistent astronomical distance framework has not yet been established. We review current efforts to homogenize the Local Group's distance framework, with particular emphasis on the potential of RR Lyrae stars as distance indicators, and attempt to extend this in an internally consistent manner to cosmological distances. Calibration based on Type Ia supernovae and distance determinations based on gravitational lensing represent particularly promising approaches. We provide a positive outlook to improvements to the status quo expected from future surveys, missions, and facilities. Astronomical distance determination has clearly reached maturity and near-consistency.
  • We overview the current status of photometric analyses of images collected with Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) at 8-10m class telescopes that operated, or are operating, on sky. Particular attention will be payed to resolved stellar population studies. Stars in crowded stellar systems, such as globular clusters or in nearby galaxies, are ideal test particles to test AO performance. We will focus the discussion on photometric precision and accuracy reached nowadays. We briefly describe our project on stellar photometry and astrometry of Galactic globular clusters using images taken with GeMS at the Gemini South telescope. We also present the photometry performed with DAOPHOT suite of programs into the crowded regions of these globulars reaching very faint limiting magnitudes Ks ~21.5 mag on moderately large fields of view (~1.5 arcmin squared). We highlight the need for new algorithms to improve the modeling of the complex variation of the Point Spread Function across the field of view. Finally, we outline the role that large samples of stellar standards plays in providing a detailed description of the MCAO performance and in precise and accurate colour{magnitude diagrams.
  • The Initial Star formation and Lifetimes of Andromeda Satellites (ISLAndS) project uses Hubble Space Telescope imaging to study a representative sample of six Andromeda dSph satellite companion galaxies. The main goal of the program is to determine whether the star formation histories (SFHs) of the Andromeda dSph satellites demonstrate significant statistical differences from those of the Milky Way, which may be attributable to the different properties of their local environments. Our observations reach the oldest main sequence turn-offs, allowing a time resolution at the oldest ages of ~ 1 Gyr, which is comparable to the best achievable resolution in the MW satellites. We find that the six dSphs present a variety of SFHs that are not strictly correlated with luminosity or present distance from M31. Specifically, we find a significant range in quenching times (lookback times from 9 to 6 Gyr), but with all quenching times more than ~ 6 Gyr ago. In agreement with observations of Milky Way companions of similar mass, there is no evidence of complete quenching of star formation by the cosmic UV background responsible for reionization, but the possibility of a degree of quenching at reionization cannot be ruled out. We do not find significant differences between the SFHs of the three members of the vast, thin plane of satellites and the three off-plane dSphs. The primary difference between the SFHs of the ISLAndS dSphs and Milky Way dSph companions of similar luminosities and host distances is the absence of very late quenching (< 5 Gyr ago) dSphs in the ISLAndS sample. Thus, models that can reproduce satellite populations with and without late quenching satellites will be of extreme interest.
  • The analysis of the early star formation history (SFH) of nearby galaxies, obtained from their resolved stellar populations is relevant as a test for cosmological models. However, the early time resolution of observationally derived SFHs is limited by several factors. Thus, direct comparison of observationally derived SFHs with those derived from theoretical models of galaxy formation is potentially biased. Here we investigate and quantify this effect. For this purpose, we analyze the duration of the early star formation activity in a sample of four Local Group dwarf galaxies and test whether they are consistent with being true fossils of the pre-reionization era; i.e., if the quenching of their star formation occurred before cosmic reionization by UV photons was completed. Two classical dSph (Cetus and Tucana) and two dTrans (LGS-3 and Phoenix) isolated galaxies with total stellar masses between $1.3\times 10^6$ to $7.2\times 10^6$ M$_\odot$ have been studied. Accounting for time resolution effects, the SFHs peak as much as 1.25 Gyr earlier than the optimal solutions. Thus, this effect is important for a proper comparison of model and observed SFHs. It is also shown that none of the analyzed galaxies can be considered a true-fossil of the pre-reionization era, although it is possible that the {\it outer regions} of Cetus and Tucana are consistent with quenching by reionization.
  • Based on data aquired in 13 orbits of HST time, we present a detailed evolutionary history of the M31 dSph satellite Andromeda XVI, including its life-time star formation history, the spatial distribution of its stellar populations, and the properties of its variable stars. And XVI is characterized by prolonged star formation activity from the oldest epochs until star formation was quenched ~6 Gyr ago, and, notably, only half of the mass in stars of And XVI was in place 10 Gyr ago. And XVI appears to be a low mass galaxy for which the early quenching by either reionization or starburst feedback seems highly unlikely, and thus, is most likely due to an environmental effect (e.g., an interaction), possibly connected to a late infall in the densest regions of the Local Group. Studying the star formation history as a function of galactocentric radius, we detect a mild gradient in the star formation history: the star formation activity between 6 and 8 Gyr ago is significantly stronger in the central regions than in the external regions, although the quenching age appears to be the same, within 1 Gyr. We also report the discovery of 9 RR Lyrae stars, 8 of which belong to And XVI. The RR Lyrae stars allow a new estimate of the distance, (m-M)0= 23.72+/-0.09 mag, which is marginally larger than previous estimates based on the tip of the red giant branch.
  • We investigated the absolute age of the Galactic globular cluster M71 (NGC 6838) by using optical ground-based images (u',g',r',i',z') collected with the MegaCam camera at the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope (CFHT). We performed a robust selection of field and cluster stars by applying a new method based on the 3D (r',u'-g',g'-r') Color-Color-Magnitude-Diagram. The comparison between the Color-Magnitude-Diagram of the candidate cluster stars and a new set of isochrones, at the locus of the Main Sequence Turn Off (MSTO), suggests an absolute age of 12+/-2 Gyr. The absolute age was also estimated using the difference in magnitude between the MSTO and the so-called main sequence knee, a well defined bending occurring in the lower main sequence. This feature was originally detected in the near-infrared (NIR) bands and explained as a consequence of an opacity mechanism (collisionally induced absorption of molecular hydrogen) in the atmosphere of cool low-mass stars (Bono et al. 2010). The same feature was also detected in the r',u'-g' and in the r',g'-r' CMD, thus supporting previous theoretical predictions by Borysow et al. (1997). The key advantage in using the Delta^(Knee)_(TO) as an age diagnostic is that it is independent of uncertainties affecting the distance, the reddening and the photometric zero-point. We found an absolute age of 12+/-1 Gyr that agrees, within the errors, with similar age estimates, but the uncertainty is on average a factor of two smaller. We also found that the Delta^(Knee)_(TO) is more sensitive to the metallicity than the MSTO, but the dependence becomes vanishing using the difference in color between the MSK and the MSTO.
  • We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Hydra II, found serendipitously within the data from the ongoing Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) conducted with the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4m Telescope. The new satellite is compact (r_h = 68 +/- 11 pc) and faint (M_V = -4.8 +/- 0.3), but well within the realm of dwarf galaxies. The stellar distribution of HydraII in the color-magnitude diagram is well-described by a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.2) and old (13 Gyr) isochrone and shows a distinct blue horizontal branch, some possible red clump stars, and faint stars that are suggestive of blue stragglers. At a heliocentric distance of 134 +/- 10 kpc, Hydra II is located in a region of the Galactic halo that models have suggested may host material from the leading arm of the Magellanic Stream. A comparison with N-body simulations hints that the new dwarf galaxy could be or could have been a satellite of the Magellanic Clouds.
  • We discuss the role that dwarf galaxies may have played in the formation of the Galactic halo (Halo) using RR Lyrae stars (RRL) as tracers of their ancient stellar component. The comparison is performed using two observables (periods, luminosity amplitudes) that are reddening and distance independent. Fundamental mode RRL in six dwarf spheroidals and eleven ultra faint dwarf galaxies (1,300) show a Gaussian period distribution well peaked around a mean period of <Pab>=0.610+-0.001 days (sigma=0.03). The Halo RRL (15,000) are characterized by a broader period distribution. The fundamental mode RRL in all the dwarf spheroidals apart from Sagittarius are completely lacking in High Amplitude Short Period (HASP) variables, defined as those having P< 0.48 days and Av> 0.75mag. Such variables are not uncommon in the Halo and among the globular clusters and massive dwarf irregulars. To further interpret this evidence, we considered eighteen globulars covering a broad range in metallicity (-2.3< [Fe/H]< -1.1) and hosting more than 35 RRL each. The metallicity turns out to be the main parameter, since only globulars more metal--rich than [Fe/H] -1.5 host RRL in the HASP region. This finding suggests that dSphs similar to the surviving ones do not appear to be the major building-blocks of the Halo. Leading physical arguments suggest an extreme upper limit of 50% to their contribution. On the other hand, massive dwarfs hosting an old population with a broad metallicity distribution (Large Magellanic Cloud, Sagittarius) may have played a primary role in the formation of the Halo.
  • We present data collected using the camera PISCES coupled with the Firt Light Adaptive Optics (FLAO) mounted at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The images were collected using two natural guide stars with an apparent magnitude of R<13 mag. During these observations the seeing was on average ~0.9". The AO performed very well: the images display a mean FWHM of 0.05 arcsec and of 0.06 arcsec in the J- and in the Ks-band, respectively. The Strehl ratio on the quoted images reaches 13-30% (J) and 50-65% (Ks), in the off and in the central pointings respectively. On the basis of this sample we have reached a J-band limiting magnitude of ~22.5 mag and the deepest Ks-band limiting magnitude ever obtained in a crowded stellar field: Ks~23 mag. J-band images display a complex change in the shape of the PSF when moving at larger radial distances from the natural guide star. In particular, the stellar images become more elongated in approaching the corners of the J-band images whereas the Ks-band images are more uniform. We discuss in detail the strategy used to perform accurate and deep photometry in these very challenging images. In particular we will focus our attention on the use of an updated version of ROMAFOT based on asymmetric and analytical Point Spread Functions. The quality of the photometry allowed us to properly identify a feature that clearly shows up in NIR bands: the main sequence knee (MSK). The MSK is independent of the evolutionary age, therefore the difference in magnitude with the canonical clock to constrain the cluster age, the main sequence turn off (MSTO), provides an estimate of the absolute age of the cluster. The key advantage of this new approach is that the error decreases by a factor of two when compared with the classical one. Combining ground-based Ks with space F606W photometry, we estimate the absolute age of M15 to be 13.70+-0.80 Gyr.
  • We have characterized the pulsation properties of 164 candidate RR Lyrae variables (RRLs) and 55 candidate Anomalous and/or short-period Cepheids in Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxy. On the basis of its RRLs Leo I is confirmed to be an Oosterhoff-intermediate type galaxy, like several other dwarfs. We show that in their pulsation properties, the RRLs representing the oldest stellar population in the galaxy are not significantly different from those of five other nearby, isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies. A similar result is obtained when comparing them to RR Lyrae stars in recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We are able to compare the period distributions and period-amplitude relations for a statistically significant sample of ab type RR Lyrae stars in dwarf galaxies (~1300stars) with those in the Galactic halo field (~14,000stars) and globular clusters (~1000stars). Field RRLs show a significant change in their period distribution when moving from the inner (dG<14 kpc) to the outer (dG>14kpc) halo regions. This suggests that the halo formed from (at least) two dissimilar progenitors or types of progenitor. Considered together, the RRLs in classical dwarf spheroidal and ultra-faint dwarf galaxies-as observed today-do not appear to follow the well defined pulsation properties shown by those in either the inner or the outer Galactic halo, nor do they have the same properties as RRLs in globular clusters. In particular, the samples of fundamental-mode RRLs in dwarfs seem to lack High Amplitudes and Short Periods ("HASP":AV>1.0mag and P <0.48d) when compared with those observed in the Galactic halo field and globular clusters. The observed properties of RRLs do not support the idea that currently existing classical dwarf spheroidal and ultra-faint dwarf galaxies are surviving representative examples of the original building blocks of the Galactic halo.
  • We present the first comparison between the lifetime star formation histories (SFHs) of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites. Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, we obtained deep optical imaging of Andromeda II (M$_{V} = -$12.0; log(M$_{\star}$/M$_{\odot}$) $\sim$ 6.7) and Andromeda XVI (M$_{V} = -$7.5; log(M$_{\star}$/M$_{\odot}$) $\sim$ 4.9) yielding color-magnitude diagrams that extend at least 1 magnitude below the oldest main sequence turnoff, and are similar in quality to those available for the MW companions. And II and And XVI show strikingly similar SFHs: both formed 50-70% of their total stellar mass between 12.5 and 5 Gyr ago (z$\sim$5-0.5) and both were abruptly quenched $\sim$ 5 Gyr ago (z$\sim$0.5). The predominance of intermediate age populations in And XVI makes it qualitatively different from faint companions of the MW and clearly not a pre-reionization fossil. Neither And II nor And XVI appears to have a clear analog among MW companions, and the degree of similarity in the SFHs of And II and And XVI is not seen among comparably faint-luminous pairs of MW satellites. These findings provide hints that satellite galaxy evolution may vary substantially among hosts of similar stellar mass. Although comparably deep observations of more M31 satellites are needed to further explore this hypothesis, our results underline the need for caution when interpreting satellite galaxies of an individual system in a broader cosmological context.
  • We present an analysis of the star formation history (SFH) of a field near the half light radius in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 based on deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging. Our observations reach the oldest main sequence turn-off, allowing a time resolution at the oldest ages of ~1 Gyr. Our analysis shows that the SFH of the observed field in IC 1613 is consistent with being constant over the entire lifetime of the galaxy. These observations rule out an early dominant episode of star formation in IC 1613. We compare the SFH of IC 1613 with expectations from cosmological models. Since most of the mass is in place at early times for low mass halos, a naive expectation is that most of the star formation should have taken place at early times. Models in which star formation follows mass accretion result in too many stars formed early and gas mass fractions which are too low today (the "over-cooling problem"). The depth of the present photometry of IC 1613 shows that, at a resolution of ~1 Gyr, the star formation rate is consistent with being constant, at even the earliest times, which is difficult to achieve in models where star formation follows mass assembly.
  • Based on Hubble Space Telescope observations from the Local Cosmology from Isolated Dwarfs project, we present the star formation histories, as a function of galactocentric radius, of four isolated Local Group dwarf galaxies: two dSph galaxies, Cetus and Tucana, and two transition galaxies (dTrs), LGS-3 and Phoenix. The oldest stellar populations of the dSphs and dTrs are, within the uncertainties, coeval ($\sim 13 Gyr$) at all galactocentric radii. We find that there are no significative differences between the four galaxies in the fundamental properties (such as the normalized star formation rate or age-metallicity relation) of their outer regions (radii greater than four exponential scale lengths); at large radii, these galaxies consist exclusively of old ($\geq 10.5 Gyr$) metal-poor stars. The duration of star formation in the inner regions vary from galaxy to galaxy, and the extended central star formation in the dTrs produces the dichotomy between dSph and dTr galaxy types. The dTr galaxies show prominent radial stellar population gradients: the centers of these galaxies host young ($\leq 1 Gyr$) populations while the age of the last formation event increases smoothly with increasing radius. This contrasts with the two dSph galaxies. Tucana shows a similar, but milder, gradient, but no gradient in age is detected Cetus. For the three galaxies with significant stellar population gradients, the exponential scale length decreases with time. These results are in agreement with outside-in scenarios of dwarf galaxy evolution, in which a quenching of the star formation toward the center occurs as the galaxy runs out of gas in the outskirts.
  • We present the Star Formation History (SFH) and the age-metallicity relation (AMR) in three fields of the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. They sample a region spanning from the centre of the galaxy to beyond one core radius, which allows studying galactocentric gradients. In all the cases, we found stars as old as 12 Gyr, together with intermediate-age and young stellar populations. The last star formation events, as young as 1 Gyr old, are mainly located in the central region, which may indicate that the gas reservoir in the outer parts of the galaxy would have been exhausted earlier than in the centre or removed by tidal interactions. The AMR is smoothly increasing in the three analyzed regions and similar to each other, indicating that no significant metallicity gradient is apparent within and around the core radius of Fornax. No significant traces of global UV-reionization or local SNe feedback are appreciated in the early SFH of Fornax. Our study is based on FORS1@VLT photometry as deep as I~24.5 and the IAC-star/IAC-pop/MinnIAC suite of codes for the determination of the SFH in resolved stellar populations.
  • We present the results of a new search for variable stars in the Local Group dwarf galaxy Leo A, based on deep photometry from the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected 166 bona fide variables in our field, of which about 60 percent are new discoveries, and 33 candidate variables. Of the confirmed variables, we found 156 Cepheids, but only 10 RR Lyrae stars despite nearly 100 percent completeness at the magnitude of the horizontal branch. The RR Lyrae stars include 7 fundamental and 3 first-overtone pulsators, with mean periods of 0.636 and 0.366 day, respectively. From their position on the period-luminosity (PL) diagram and light-curve morphology, we classify 91, 58, and 4 Cepheids as fundamental, first-overtone, and second-overtone mode Classical Cepheids (CC), respectively, and two as population II Cepheids. However, due to the low metallicity of Leo A, about 90 percent of the detected Cepheids have periods shorter than 1.5 days. Comparison with theoretical models indicate that some of the fainter stars classified as CC could be Anomalous Cepheids. We estimate the distance to Leo A using the tip of the RGB (TRGB) and various methods based on the photometric and pulsational properties of the Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars. The distances obtained with the TRGB and RR Lyrae stars agree well with each other while that from the Cepheid PL relations is somewhat larger, which may indicate a mild metallicity effect on the luminosity of the short-period Cepheids. Due to its very low metallicity, Leo A thus serves as a valuable calibrator of the metallicity dependencies of the variable star luminosities.
  • Context. The properties of variable stars can give independent constraints on the star formation history of the host galaxy, by determining the age and metallicity of the parent population. Aims. We investigate the pulsation properties of 84 Anomalous Cepheids (ACs) detected by the OGLE-III survey in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), in order to understand the formation mechanism and the characteristics of the parent population they came from. Methods. We used an updated theoretical pulsation scenario to derive the mass and the pulsation mode of each AC in the sample. We also used a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to analyze the spatial distribution of the ACs, in comparison with that of other groups of variable stars, and connect their properties with the star formation history of the LMC. Results. We find that the mean mass of ACs is 1.2 \pm 0.2Mo. We show that ACs do not follow the same spatial distribution of classical Cepheids. This and the difference in their period-luminosity relations further support the hypothesis that ACs are not the extension to low luminosity of classical Cepheids. The spatial distribution of ACs is also different from that of bona-fide tracers of the old population, such as RR Lyrae stars and population II Cepheids. We therefore suggest that the majority of ACs in the LMC are made of intermediate-age (1-6Gyr), metal-poor single stars. Finally, we investigate the relation between the frequency of ACs and the luminosity of the host galaxy, disclosing that purely old systems follow a very tight relation and that galaxies with strong intermediate-age and young star formation tend to have an excess of ACs, in agreement with their hosting ACs formed via both single and binary star channels.
  • We present a detailed analysis of two fields located 26 kpc (~5 scalelengths) from the centre of M31. One field samples the major axis populations--the Outer Disc field--while the other is offset by ~18' and samples the Warp in the stellar disc. The CMDs based on HST/ACS imaging reach old main-sequence turn-offs (~12.5 Gyr). We apply the CMD-fitting technique to the Warp field to reconstruct the star formation history (SFH). We find that after undergoing roughly constant SF until about 4.5 Gyr ago, there was a rapid decline in activity and then a ~1.5 Gyr lull, followed by a strong burst lasting 1.5 Gyr and responsible for 25% of the total stellar mass in this field. This burst appears to be accompanied by a decline in metallicity which could be a signature of the inflow of metal-poor gas. The onset of the burst (~3 Gyr ago) corresponds to the last close passage of M31 and M33 as predicted by detailed N-body modelling, and may have been triggered by this event. We reprocess the deep M33 outer disc field data of Barker et al. (2011) in order to compare consistently-derived SFHs. This reveals a similar duration burst that is exactly coeval with that seen in the M31 Warp field, lending further support to the interaction hypothesis. The complex SFHs and the smoothly-varying age-metallicity relations suggest that the stellar populations observed in the far outer discs of both galaxies have largely formed in situ rather than migrated from smaller galactocentric radii. The strong differential reddening affecting the CMD of the Outer Disc field prevents derivation of the SFH. Instead, we quantify this reddening and find that the fine-scale distribution of dust precisely follows that of the HI gas. This indicates that the outer HI disc of M31 contains a substantial amount of dust and therefore suggests significant metal enrichment in these parts, consistent with inferences from our CMD analysis.
  • We present an analysis of the star formation history (SFH) of the transition-type (dIrr/dSph) Local Group galaxy \objectname[]{LGS-3} (Pisces) based on deep photometry obtained with the {\it Advanced Camera for Surveys} onboard the {\it Hubble Space Telescope}. Our analysis shows that the SFH of \objectname[]{LGS-3} is dominated by a main episode $\sim 11.7$ Gyr ago with a duration of $\sim$ 1.4 Gyr which formed $\sim 90%$ of the stars. Subsequently, \objectname[]{LGS-3} continued forming stars until the present, although at a much lower rate. The lack of early chemical enrichment is in contrast to that observed in the isolated dSph galaxies of comparable luminosity, implying that the dSphs were more massive and subjected to more tidal stripping. We compare the SFH of \objectname[]{LGS-3} with expectations from cosmological models. Most or all the star formation was produced in \objectname[]{LGS-3} after the reionization epoch, assumed to be completed at $z\sim6$ or $\sim 12.7$ Gyr ago. The total mass of the galaxy is estimated to be between 2 and $4\times 10^8$ M$_\odot$, corresponding to circular velocities between 28 km\ s$^{-1}$ to 36 km\ s$^{-1}$. These values are close to but somewhat above the limit of 30 km\ s$^{-1}$ below which the UV background is expected to prevent any star formation after reionization. Feedback from SNe associated with the initial episode of star formation (mechanical luminosity from SNe $L_w=5.3\times 10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$) is probably inadequate to completely blow away the gas. However, the combined effects of SN feedback and UV background heating might be expected to completely halt star formation at the reionization epoch for the low mass of \objectname[]{LGS-3}; this suggests that self-shielding is important to the early evolution of galaxies in this mass range.
  • We present new measurements of the magnitude of the main sequence turn off and the red giant branch bump in the luminosity function of a sample of Galactic globular clusters with updated estimates of [Fe/H] and [$\alpha$/Fe], employing photometric data collected with the Advanced Camera for Survey on board the HST. We compare measured and predicted values of the magnitude difference between these two features, a rarely employed diagnostic of the internal structure of low-mass stars at the beginning of their red giant evolution. Our analysis discloses a clear discrepancy between theory and observations, the theoretical red giant branch bump magnitudes being too bright by on average $\sim0.2$~mag. This corroborates results from the more widely studied magnitude difference between horizontal branch and red giant bump, avoiding the well known problems associated to the determination of the horizontal branch level from colour magnitude diagrams, and to uncertainties in the luminosity of horizontal branch stellar models. We briefly discuss several potential solutions of this discrepancy.
  • We present period change rates (dP/dt) for 42 RR Lyrae variables in the globular cluster IC$\,$4499. Despite clear evidence of these period increases or decreases, the observed period change rates are an order of magnitude larger than predicted from theoretical models of this cluster. We find there is a preference for increasing periods, a phenomenon observed in most RR Lyrae stars in Milky Way globular clusters. The period-change rates as a function of position in the period-amplitude plane are used to examine possible evolutionary effects in OoI clusters, OoII clusters, field RR Lyrae stars and the mixed-population cluster $\omega$~ Centauri. It is found that there is no correlation between the period change rate and the typical definition of Oosterhoff groups. If the RR Lyrae period changes correspond with evolutionary effects, this would be in contrast to the hypothesis that RR Lyrae variables in OoII systems are evolved HB stars that spent their ZAHB phase on the blue side of the instability strip. This may suggest that age may not be the primary explanation for the Oosterhoff types.