• We present an Angluin-style algorithm to learn nominal automata, which are acceptors of languages over infinite (structured) alphabets. The abstract approach we take allows us to seamlessly extend known variations of the algorithm to this new setting. In particular we can learn a subclass of nominal non-deterministic automata. An implementation using a recently developed Haskell library for nominal computation is provided for preliminary experiments.
  • Automata learning has been successfully applied in the verification of hardware and software. The size of the automaton model learned is a bottleneck for scalability, and hence optimizations that enable learning of compact representations are important. This paper exploits monads, both as a mathematical structure and a programming construct, to design, prove correct, and implement a wide class of such optimizations. The former perspective on monads allows us to develop a new algorithm and accompanying correctness proofs, building upon a general framework for automata learning based on category theory. The new algorithm is parametric on a monad, which provides a rich algebraic structure to capture non-determinism and other side-effects. We show that our approach allows us to uniformly capture existing algorithms, develop new ones, and add optimizations. The latter perspective allows us to effortlessly translate the theory into practice: we provide a Haskell library implementing our general framework, and we show experimental results for two specific instances: non-deterministic and weighted automata.
  • Automata learning is a technique that has successfully been applied in verification, with the automaton type varying depending on the application domain. Adaptations of automata learning algorithms for increasingly complex types of automata have to be developed from scratch because there was no abstract theory offering guidelines. This makes it hard to devise such algorithms, and it obscures their correctness proofs. We introduce a simple category-theoretic formalism that provides an appropriately abstract foundation for studying automata learning. Furthermore, our framework establishes formal relations between algorithms for learning, testing, and minimization. We illustrate its generality with two examples: deterministic and weighted automata.
  • In this paper we revisit some pioneering efforts to equip Petri nets with compact operational models for expressing causality. The models we propose have a bisimilarity relation and a minimal representative for each equivalence class, and they can be fully explained as coalgebras on a presheaf category on an index category of partial orders. First, we provide a set-theoretic model in the form of a a causal case graph, that is a labeled transition system where states and transitions represent markings and firings of the net, respectively, and are equipped with causal information. Most importantly, each state has a poset representing causal dependencies among past events. Our first result shows the correspondence with behavior structure semantics as proposed by Trakhtenbrot and Rabinovich. Causal case graphs may be infinitely-branching and have infinitely many states, but we show how they can be refined to get an equivalent finitely-branching model. In it, states are equipped with symmetries, which are essential for the existence of a minimal, often finite-state, model. The next step is constructing a coalgebraic model. We exploit the fact that events can be represented as names, and event generation as name generation. Thus we can apply the Fiore-Turi framework: we model causal relations as a suitable category of posets with action labels, and generation of new events with causal dependencies as an endofunctor on this category. Then we define a well-behaved category of coalgebras. Our coalgebraic model is still infinite-state, but we exploit the equivalence between coalgebras over a class of presheaves and History Dependent automata to derive a compact representation, which is equivalent to our set-theoretical compact model. Remarkably, state reduction is automatically performed along the equivalence.
  • Many optimization problems can be naturally represented as (hyper) graphs, where vertices correspond to variables and edges to tasks, whose cost depends on the values of the adjacent variables. Capitalizing on the structure of the graph, suitable dynamic programming strategies can select certain orders of evaluation of the variables which guarantee to reach both an optimal solution and a minimal size of the tables computed in the optimization process. In this paper we introduce a simple algebraic specification with parallel composition and restriction whose terms up to structural axioms are the graphs mentioned above. In addition, free (unrestricted) vertices are labelled with variables, and the specification includes operations of name permutation with finite support. We show a correspondence between the well-known tree decompositions of graphs and our terms. If an axiom of scope extension is dropped, several (hierarchical) terms actually correspond to the same graph. A suitable graphical structure can be found, corresponding to every hierarchical term. Evaluating such a graphical structure in some target algebra yields a dynamic programming strategy. If the target algebra satisfies the scope extension axiom, then the result does not depend on the particular structure, but only on the original graph. We apply our approach to the parking optimization problem developed in the ASCENS e-mobility case study, in collaboration with Volkswagen. Dynamic programming evaluations are particularly interesting for autonomic systems, where actual behavior often consists of propagating local knowledge to obtain global knowledge and getting it back for local decisions.
  • We define a class of languages of infinite words over infinite alphabets, and the corresponding automata. The automata used for recognition are a generalisation of deterministic Muller automata to the setting of nominal sets. Remarkably, the obtained languages are determined by their ultimately periodic fragments, as in the classical case. Closure under complement, union and intersection, and decidability of emptiness and equivalence are preserved by the generalisation. This is shown by using finite representations of the (otherwise infinite-state) defined class of automata.