• We present new measurements of the free-streaming of warm dark matter (WDM) from Lyman-$\alpha$ flux-power spectra. We use data from the medium resolution, intermediate redshift XQ-100 sample observed with the X-shooter spectrograph ($z=3 - 4.2$) and the high-resolution, high-redshift sample used in Viel et al. (2013) obtained with the HIRES/MIKE spectrographs ($z=4.2 - 5.4$). Based on further improved modelling of the dependence of the Lyman-$\alpha$ flux-power spectrum on the free-streaming of dark matter, cosmological parameters, as well as the thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) with hydrodynamical simulations, we obtain the following limits, expressed as the equivalent mass of thermal relic WDM particles. The XQ-100 flux power spectrum alone gives a lower limit of 1.4 keV, the re-analysis of the HIRES/MIKE sample gives 4.1 keV while the combined analysis gives our best and significantly strengthened lower limit of 5.3 keV (all 2$\sigma$ C.L.). The further improvement in the joint analysis is partly due to the fact that the two data sets have different degeneracies between astrophysical and cosmological parameters that are broken when the data sets are combined, and more importantly on chosen priors on the thermal evolution. These results all assume that the temperature evolution of the IGM can be modelled as a power law in redshift. Allowing for a non-smooth evolution of the temperature of the IGM with sudden temperature changes of up to 5000K reduces the lower limit for the combined analysis to 3.5 keV. A WDM with smaller thermal relic masses would require, however, a sudden temperature jump of $5000\,K$ or more in the narrow redshift interval $z=4.6-4.8$, in disagreement with observations of the thermal history based on high-resolution resolution Lyman-$\alpha$ forest data and expectations for photo-heating and cooling in the low density IGM at these redshifts.
  • We investigate the future perspectives of the detection of the relativistic dipole by cross-correlating the 21 cm emission in Intensity Mapping (IM) and galaxy surveys at low redshift. We model the neutral hydrogen (HI) and the galaxy population by means of the halo model to relate the parameters that affect the dipole signal such as the biases of the two tracers and the Poissonian noise. We investigate the behavior of the signal-to-noise as a function of the galaxy and magnification biases, for two fixed models of the neutral hydrogen. In both cases we found that the signal-to-noise does not grow by increasing the difference between the biases of the two tracers, due to the larger shot-noise yields by highly biased tracers. We also study and provide an optimal luminosity-threshold galaxy catalogue to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the relativistic dipole. Interestingly, we show that the maximum magnitude provided by the survey does not lead to the maximum signal-to-noise for detecting relativistic effects and we predict the optimal value for the limiting magnitude. Our work suggests that an optimal analysis could increase the signal-to-noise ratio up to a factor five compared to a standard one.
  • We investigate the possibility of performing cosmological studies in the redshift range $2.5<z<5$ through suitable extensions of existing and upcoming radio-telescopes like CHIME, HIRAX and FAST. We use the Fisher matrix technique to forecast the bounds that those instruments can place on the growth rate, the BAO distance scale parameters, the sum of the neutrino masses and the number of relativistic degrees of freedom at decoupling, $N_{\rm eff}$. We point out that quantities that depend on the amplitude of the 21cm power spectrum, like $f\sigma_8$, are completely degenerate with $\Omega_{\rm HI}$ and $b_{\rm HI}$, and propose several strategies to independently constraint them through cross-correlations with other probes. Assuming $5\%$ priors on $\Omega_{\rm HI}$ and $b_{\rm HI}$, $k_{\rm max}=0.2~h{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ and the primary beam wedge, we find that a HIRAX extension can constrain, within bins of $\Delta z=0.1$: 1) the value of $f\sigma_8$ at $\simeq4\%$, 2) the value of $D_A$ and $H$ at $\simeq1\%$. In combination with data from Euclid-like galaxy surveys and CMB S4, the sum of the neutrino masses can be constrained with an error equal to $23$ meV ($1\sigma$), while $N_{\rm eff}$ can be constrained within 0.02 ($1\sigma$). We derive similar constraints for the extensions of the other instruments. We study in detail the dependence of our results on the instrument, amplitude of the HI bias, the foreground wedge coverage, the nonlinear scale used in the analysis, uncertainties in the theoretical modeling and the priors on $b_{\rm HI}$ and $\Omega_{\rm HI}$. We conclude that 21cm intensity mapping surveys operating in this redshift range can provide extremely competitive constraints on key cosmological parameters.
  • We derive a generalized luminosity distance versus redshift relation for a linearly perturbed FLRW (Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker) metric with two scalar mode excitations. We use two equivalent approaches, based on the Jacobi map and the van Vleck determinant respectively. We apply the resultant formula to two simple models - an exact FLRW universe and an approximate FLRW universe perturbed by a single scalar mode sinusoidally varying with time. For both models we derive a cosmographic expansion for d_L in terms of z. We comment on the interpretation of our results and their possible application to more realistic cosmological models.
  • The notion of luminosity distance is most often defined in purely FLRW (Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker) cosmological spacetimes, or small perturbations thereof. However, the abstract notion of luminosity distance is actually much more robust than this, and can be defined non-perturbatively in almost arbitrary spacetimes. Some quite general results are already known, in terms of $dA_\mathrm{observer}/d\Omega_\mathrm{source}$, the cross-sectional area per unit solid angle of a null geodesic spray emitted from some source and subsequently detected by some observer. We shall reformulate these results in terms of a suitably normalized null geodesic affine parameter and the van Vleck determinant, $\Delta_{vV}$. The contribution due to the null geodesic affine parameter is effectively the inverse square law for luminosity, and the van Vleck determinant can be viewed as providing a measure of deviations from the inverse square law. This formulation is closely related to the so-called Jacobi determinant, but the van Vleck determinant has somewhat nicer analytic properties and wider and deeper theoretical base in the general relativity, quantum physics, and quantum field theory communities. In the current article we shall concentrate on non-perturbative results, leaving near-FLRW perturbative investigation for future work.
  • Gravitational non-linear evolution induces a shift in the position of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak together with a damping and broadening of its shape that bias and degrades the accuracy with which the position of the peak can be determined. BAO reconstruction is a technique developed to undo part of the effect of non-linearities. We present and analyse a reconstruction method that consists of displacing pixels instead of galaxies and whose implementation is easier than the standard reconstruction method. We show that this method is equivalent to the standard reconstruction technique in the limit where the number of pixels becomes very large. This method is particularly useful in surveys where individual galaxies are not resolved, as in 21cm intensity mapping observations. We validate this method by reconstructing mock pixelated maps, that we build from the distribution of matter and halos in real- and redshift-space, from a large set of numerical simulations. We find that this method is able to decrease the uncertainty in the BAO peak position by 30-50% over the typical angular resolution scales of 21 cm intensity mapping experiments.
  • Large-scale extragalactic magnetic fields may induce conversions between very-high-energy photons and axionlike particles (ALPs), thereby shielding the photons from absorption on the extragalactic background light. However, in simplified "cell" models, used so far to represent extragalactic magnetic fields, this mechanism would be strongly suppressed by current astrophysical bounds. Here we consider a recent model of extragalactic magnetic fields obtained from large-scale cosmological simulations. Such simulated magnetic fields would have large enhancement in the filaments of matter. As a result, photon-ALP conversions would produce a significant spectral hardening for cosmic TeV photons. This effect would be probed with the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array detector. This possible detection would give a unique chance to perform a tomography of the magnetized cosmic web with ALPs.
  • We investigate constraints on scalar dark matter (DM) by analyzing the Lyman-alpha forest, which probes structure formation at medium and small scales, and also by studying its cosmological consequences at high and low redshift. For scalar DM that constitutes more than 30% of the total DM density, we obtain a lower limit m >~ 10^{-21} eV for the mass of scalar DM. This implies an upper limit on the initial field displacement (or the decay constant for an axion-like field) of phi <~ 10^{16} GeV. We also derive limits on the energy scale of cosmic inflation and establish an upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r < 10^{-3} in the presence of scalar DM. Furthermore, we show that there is very little room for ultralight scalar DM to solve the "small-scale crisis" of cold DM without spoiling the Lyman-alpha forest results. The constraints presented in this paper can be used for testing generic theories that contain light scalar fields.
  • We present constraints on the masses of extremely light bosons dubbed fuzzy dark matter from Lyman-$\alpha$ forest data. Extremely light bosons with a De Broglie wavelength of $\sim 1$ kpc have been suggested as dark matter candidates that may resolve some of the current small scale problems of the cold dark matter model. For the first time we use hydrodynamical simulations to model the Lyman-$\alpha$ flux power spectrum in these models and compare with the observed flux power spectrum from two different data sets: the XQ-100 and HIRES/MIKE quasar spectra samples. After marginalization over nuisance and physical parameters and with conservative assumptions for the thermal history of the IGM that allow for jumps in the temperature of up to $5000\rm\,K$, XQ-100 provides a lower limit of 7.1$\times 10^{-22}$ eV, HIRES/MIKE returns a stronger limit of 14.3$\times 10^{-22}$ eV, while the combination of both data sets results in a limit of 20 $\times 10^{-22}$ eV (2$\sigma$ C.L.). The limits for the analysis of the combined data sets increases to 37.5$\times 10^{-22}$ eV (2$\sigma$ C.L.) when a smoother thermal history is assumed where the temperature of the IGM evolves as a power-law in redshift. Light boson masses in the range $1-10 \times10^{-22}$ eV are ruled out at high significance by our analysis, casting strong doubts that FDM helps solve the "small scale crisis" of the cold dark matter models.
  • We study the imprint of non-standard dark energy (DE) and dark matter (DM) models on the 21cm intensity map power spectra from high-redshift neutral hydrogen (HI) gas. To this purpose we use halo catalogs from N-body simulations of dynamical DE models and DM scenarios which are statistically indistinguishable from the standard Cold Dark Matter model with Cosmological Constant (LCDM) using currently available cosmological observations. We limit our analysis to halo catalogs at redshift z = 1 and 2.3 which are common to all simulations. For each catalog we model the HI distribution by using a simple prescription to associate the HI gas mass to N-body halos. We find that the DE models leave a distinct signature on the HI spectra across a wide range of scales, which correlates with differences in the halo mass function and the onset of the non-linear regime of clustering. In the case of the non-standard DM model significant differences of the HI spectra with respect to the LCDM model only arise from the suppressed abundance of low mass halos. These cosmological model dependent features also appear in the 21cm spectra. In particular, we find that future SKA measurements can distinguish the imprints of DE and DM models at high statistical significance.
  • We study the effect of different feedback prescriptions on the properties of the low redshift ($z\leq1.6$) Ly$\alpha$ forest using a selection of hydrodynamical simulations drawn from the Sherwood simulation suite. The simulations incorporate stellar feedback, AGN feedback and a simplified scheme for efficiently modelling the low column density Ly$\alpha$ forest. We confirm a discrepancy remains between Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) observations of the Ly$\alpha$ forest column density distribution function (CDDF) at $z \simeq 0.1$ for high column density systems ($N_{\rm HI}>10^{14}\rm\,cm^{-2}$), as well as Ly$\alpha$ velocity widths that are too narrow compared to the COS data. Stellar or AGN feedback -- as currently implemented in our simulations -- have only a small effect on the CDDF and velocity width distribution. We conclude that resolving the discrepancy between the COS data and simulations requires an increase in the temperature of overdense gas with $\Delta=4$--$40$, either through additional He$\,\rm \scriptstyle II\ $ photo-heating at $z>2$ or fine-tuned feedback that ejects overdense gas into the IGM at just the right temperature for it to still contribute significantly to the Ly$\alpha$ forest. Alternatively a larger, currently unresolved turbulent component to the line width could resolve the discrepancy.
  • Structure formation at small cosmological scales provides an important frontier for dark matter (DM) research. Scenarios with small DM particle masses, large momenta or hidden interactions tend to suppress the gravitational clustering at small scales. The details of this suppression depend on the DM particle nature, allowing for a direct link between DM models and astrophysical observations. However, most of the astrophysical constraints obtained so far refer to a very specific shape of the power suppression, corresponding to thermal warm dark matter (WDM), i.e., candidates with a Fermi-Dirac or Bose-Einstein momentum distribution. In this work we introduce a new analytical fitting formula for the power spectrum, which is simple yet flexible enough to reproduce the clustering signal of large classes of non-thermal DM models, which are not at all adequately described by the oversimplified notion of WDM. We show that the formula is able to fully cover the parameter space of sterile neutrinos (whether resonantly produced or from particle decay), mixed cold and warm models, fuzzy dark matter, as well as other models suggested by effective theory of structure formation (ETHOS). Based on this fitting formula, we perform a large suite of N-body simulations and we extract important nonlinear statistics, such as the matter power spectrum and the halo mass function. Finally, we present the first preliminary astrophysical constraints from both the number of Milky Way satellites and the Lyman-{\alpha} forest. This paper is a first step towards a general and comprehensive modeling of small-scale departures from the standard cold DM model.
  • We investigate the cross-correlation signal between 21cm intensity mapping maps and the Lyman-alpha forest in the fully non-linear regime using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations. The cross-correlation signal between these fields can provide a coherent and comprehensive picture of the neutral hydrogen (HI) content of our Universe in the post-reionization era, probing both its mass content and volume distribution. We compute the auto-power spectra of both fields together with their cross-power spectrum at z = 2.4 and find that on large scales the fields are completely anti-correlated. This anti-correlation arises because regions with high (low) 21cm emission, such as those with a large (low) concentration of damped Lyman-alpha systems, will show up as regions with low (high) transmitted flux. We find that on scales smaller than k = 0.2 h/Mpc the cross-correlation coefficient departs from -1, at a scale where non-linearities show up. We use the anisotropy of the power spectra in redshift-space to determine the values of the bias and of the redshift-space distortion parameters of both fields; we find that the errors on the value of these parameters could decrease by 30% when adding data from the cross-power spectrum in a conservative analysis. Our results point out that linear theory is capable of reproducing the shape and amplitude of the cross-power up to rather non-linear scales. Finally, we find that the 21cm-Lya cross-power spectrum can be detected by combining data from a BOSS-like survey together with 21cm intensity mapping observations by SKA1-MID with a S/N ratio higher than 3 in the range 0.06< k <1 h/Mpc. We emphasize that while the shape and amplitude of the 21cm auto-power spectrum can be severely affected by residual foreground contamination, cross-power spectra will be less sensitive to that and therefore can be used to identify systematics in the 21cm maps.
  • We investigate the Alcock Paczynski (AP) test applied to the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the galaxy correlation function. By using a general formalism that includes relativistic effects, we quantify the importance of the linear redshift space distortions and gravitational lensing corrections to the galaxy number density fluctuation. We show that redshift space distortions significantly affect the shape of the correlation function, both in radial and transverse directions, causing different values of galaxy bias to induce offsets up to 1% in the AP test. On the other hand, we find that the lensing correction around the BAO scale modifies the amplitude but not the shape of the correlation function and therefore does not introduce any systematic effect. Furthermore, we investigate in details how the AP test is sensitive to redshift binning: a window function in transverse direction suppresses correlations and shifts the peak position toward smaller angular scales. We determine the correction that should be applied in order to account for this effect, when performing the test with data from three future planned galaxy redshift surveys: Euclid, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA).
  • We present the Lyman-$\alpha$ flux power spectrum measurements of the XQ-100 sample of quasar spectra obtained in the context of the European Southern Observatory Large Programme "Quasars and their absorption lines: a legacy survey of the high redshift universe with VLT/XSHOOTER". Using $100$ quasar spectra with medium resolution and signal-to-noise ratio we measure the power spectrum over a range of redshifts $z = 3 - 4.2$ and over a range of scales $k = 0.003 - 0.06\,\mathrm{s\,km^{-1}}$. The results agree well with the measurements of the one-dimensional power spectrum found in the literature. The data analysis used in this paper is based on the Fourier transform and has been tested on synthetic data. Systematic and statistical uncertainties of our measurements are estimated, with a total error (statistical and systematic) comparable to the one of the BOSS data in the overlapping range of scales, and smaller by more than $50\%$ for higher redshift bins ($z>3.6$) and small scales ($k > 0.01\,\mathrm{s\,km^{-1}}$). The XQ-100 data set has the unique feature of having signal-to-noise ratios and resolution intermediate between the two data sets that are typically used to perform cosmological studies, i.e. BOSS and high-resolution spectra (e.g. UVES/VLT or HIRES). More importantly, the measured flux power spectra span the high redshift regime which is usually more constraining for structure formation models.
  • We report the detection of a cross-correlation signal between {\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope diffuse gamma-ray maps and catalogs of clusters. In our analysis, we considered three different catalogs: WHL12, redMaPPer and PlanckSZ. They all show a positive correlation with different amplitudes, related to the average mass of the objects in each catalog, which also sets the catalog bias. The signal detection is confirmed by the results of a stacking analysis. The cross-correlation signal extends to rather large angular scales, around 1 degree, that correspond, at the typical redshift of the clusters in these catalogs, to a few to tens of Mpc, i.e. the typical scale-length of the large scale structures in the Universe. Most likely this signal is contributed by the cumulative emission from AGNs associated to the filamentary structures that converge toward the high peaks of the matter density field in which galaxy clusters reside. In addition, our analysis reveals the presence of a second component, more compact in size and compatible with a point-like emission from within individual clusters. At present, we cannot distinguish between the two most likely interpretations for such a signal, i.e. whether it is produced by AGNs inside clusters or if it is a diffuse gamma-ray emission from the intra-cluster medium. We argue that this latter, intriguing, hypothesis might be tested by applying this technique to a low redshift large mass cluster sample.
  • We present high signal-to-noise galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements of the BOSS CMASS sample using 250 square degrees of weak lensing data from CFHTLenS and CS82. We compare this signal with predictions from mock catalogs trained to match observables including the stellar mass function and the projected and two dimensional clustering of CMASS. We show that the clustering of CMASS, together with standard models of the galaxy-halo connection, robustly predicts a lensing signal that is 20-40% larger than observed. Detailed tests show that our results are robust to a variety of systematic effects. Lowering the value of $S_{\rm 8}=\sigma_{\rm 8} \sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}$ compared to Planck2015 reconciles the lensing with clustering. However, given the scale of our measurement ($r<10$ $h^{-1}$ Mpc), other effects may also be at play and need to be taken into consideration. We explore the impact of baryon physics, assembly bias, massive neutrinos, and modifications to general relativity on $\Delta\Sigma$ and show that several of these effects may be non-negligible given the precision of our measurement. Disentangling cosmological effects from the details of the galaxy-halo connection, the effects of baryons, and massive neutrinos, is the next challenge facing joint lensing and clustering analyses. This is especially true in the context of large galaxy samples from Baryon Acoustic Oscillation surveys with precise measurements but complex selection functions.
  • We compare the measured angular cross-correlation between the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sky and catalogues of extra-galactic objects with the expected signal induced by weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter (DM). We include a detailed description of the contribution of astrophysical gamma-ray emitters such as blazars, misaligned AGN and star forming galaxies, and perform a global fit to the measured cross-correlation. Five catalogues are considered: SDSS-DR6 quasars, 2MASS galaxies, NVSS radio galaxies, SDSS-DR8 Luminous Red Galaxies and SDSS-DR8 main galaxy sample. To model the cross-correlation signal we use the halo occupation distribution formalism to estimate the number of galaxies of a given catalogue in DM halos and their spatial correlation properties. We discuss uncertainties in the predicted cross-correlation signal arising from the DM clustering and WIMP microscopic properties, which set the DM gamma-ray emission. The use of different catalogues probing objects at different redshifts reduces significantly, though not completely, the degeneracy among the different gamma-ray components. We find that the presence of a significant WIMP DM signal is allowed by the data but not significantly preferred by the fit, although this is mainly due to a degeneracy with the misaligned AGN component. With modest substructure boost, the sensitivity of this method excludes thermal annihilation cross sections at 95% C.L. for WIMP masses up to few tens of GeV. Constraining the low-redshift properties of astrophysical populations with future data will further improve the sensitivity to DM.
  • We quantitatively investigate the possibility of detecting baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) using single-dish 21cm intensity mapping observations in the post-reionization era. We show that the telescope beam smears out the isotropic BAO signature and, in the case of the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) instrument, makes it undetectable at redshifts $z\gtrsim1$. We however demonstrate that the BAO peak can still be detected in the radial 21cm power spectrum and describe a method to make this type of measurements. By means of numerical simulations, containing the 21cm cosmological signal as well as the most relevant Galactic and extra-Galactic foregrounds and basic instrumental effect, we quantify the precision with which the radial BAO scale can be measured in the 21cm power spectrum. We systematically investigate the signal-to-noise and the precision of the recovered BAO signal as a function of cosmic variance, instrumental noise, angular resolution and foreground contamination. We find that the expected noise levels of SKA would degrade the final BAO errors by $\sim5\%$ with respect to the cosmic-variance limited case at low redshifts, but that the effect grows up to $\sim65\%$ at $z\sim2-3$. Furthermore, we find that the radial BAO signature is robust against foreground systematics, and that the main effect is an increase of $\sim20\%$ in the final uncertainty on the standard ruler caused by the contribution of foreground residuals as well as the reduction in sky area needed to avoid high-foreground regions. We also find that it should be possible to detect the radial BAO signature with high significance in the full redshift range. We conclude that a 21cm experiment carried out by the SKA should be able to make direct measurements of the expansion rate $H(z)$ with competitive per-cent level precision on redshifts $z\lesssim2.5$.
  • We present the Data Release 12 Quasar catalog (DR12Q) from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the SDSS-III. This catalog includes all SDSS-III/BOSS objects that were spectroscopically targeted as quasar candidates during the full survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra, have luminosities Mi[z=2]<-20.5 (in a LCDM cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega _L=0.7), and either display at least one emission line with a full width at half maximum (FWHM)larger than 500 km/s or, if not, have interesting/complex absorption features. The catalog also includes previously known quasars (mostly from SDSS-I and II) that were reobserved by BOSS. The catalog contains 297,301 quasars detected over 9,376 square degrees with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra. The number of quasars with z>2.15 is about an order of magnitude greater than the number of z>2.15 quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 29,580 broad absorption line quasars and lists their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-based photometry together with some information on the optical morphology and the selection criteria. When available, the catalog also provides information on the optical variability of quasars using SDSS and PTF multi-epoch photometry. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra, covering the wavelength region 3,600-10,500A at a spectral resolution in the range 1,300<R<2,500, can be retrieved from the SDSS Catalog Archive Server.
  • Clusters of galaxies have the potential of providing powerful constraints on possible deviations from General Relativity. We use the catalogue of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich sources detected by Planck and consider a correction to the halo mass function for a f(R) class of modified gravity models, which has been recently found to reproduce well results from N-body simulations, to place constraints on the scalaron field amplitude at the present time, $f_{R}^0$. We find that applying this correction to different calibrations of the halo mass function produces upper bounds on $f_{R}^0$ tighter by more than an order of magnitude, ranging from $\log_{10}(-f_{R}^0) < -5.81$ to $\log_{10}(-f_{R}^0) < -4.40$ (95 % confidence level). This sensitivity is due to the different shape of the halo mass function, which is degenerate with the parameters used to calibrate the scaling relations between SZ observables and cluster masses. Any claim of constraints more stringent that the weaker limit above, based on cluster number counts, appear to be premature and must be supported by a careful calibration of the halo mass function and by a robust calibration of the mass scaling relations.
  • The free-streaming of keV-scale particles impacts structure growth on scales that are probed by the Lyman-alpha forest of distant quasars. Using an unprecedentedly large sample of medium-resolution QSO spectra from the ninth data release of SDSS, along with a state-of-the-art set of hydrodynamical simulations to model the Lyman-alpha forest in the non-linear regime, we issue one of the tightest bounds to date, from Ly-$\alpha$ data alone, on pure dark matter particles : $m_X > 4.09 \: \rm{keV}$ (95% CL) for early decoupled thermal relics such as a hypothetical gravitino, and correspondingly $m_s > 24.4 \: \rm{keV}$ (95% CL) for a non-resonantly produced right-handed neutrino. This limit depends on the value on $n_s$, and Planck measures a higher value of $n_s$ than SDSS-III/BOSS. Our bounds thus change slightly when Ly-$\alpha$ data are combined with CMB data from Planck 2016. The limits shift to $m_X > 2.96 \: \rm{keV}$ (95% CL) and $m_s > 16.0 \: \rm{keV}$ (95% CL). Thanks to SDSS-III data featuring smaller uncertainties and covering a larger redshift range than SDSS-I data, our bounds confirm the most stringent results established by previous works and are further at odds with a purely non-resonantly produced sterile neutrino as dark matter.
  • We present the calculation of the Lyman-alpha (Lyman-$\alpha$) transmitted flux fluctuations with full relativistic corrections to the first order. Even though several studies exist on relativistic effects in galaxy clustering, this is the first study to extend the formalism to a different tracer of underlying matter at unique redshift range ($z=2-5$). Furthermore, we show a comprehensive application of our calculations of the Quasar-Lyman-$\alpha$ cross-correlation function. Our results indicate that the signal of relativistic effects is sizeable at Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale mainly due to the large difference in density bias factors of our tracers. We construct an observable, the anti-symmetric part of the cross-correlation function, that is dominated by the relativistic signal and offers a new way to measure the relativistic terms at relatively small scales. The analysis shows that relativistic effects are important when considering cross-correlations between tracers with very different biases, and should be included in the data analysis of the current and future surveys. Moreover, the idea presented in this paper is highly complementary to other techniques and observable trying to isolate the effect of the relativistic corrections and thus test the validity of the theory of gravity beyond the Newtonian regime.
  • Cosmology is making impressive progress and it is producing stringent bounds on the sum of the neutrino masses {\Sigma}, a parameter of great importance for the current laboratory experiments. In this letter, we exploit the potential relevance of the analysis of Palanque-Delabrouille et al. [JCAP 1502, 045 (2015)] to the neutrinoless double beta decay (0{\nu}{\beta}{\beta}) search. This analysis indicates small values for the lightest neutrino mass, since the authors find {\Sigma} < 84 meV at 1{\sigma} C. L., and provides a 1{\sigma} preference for the normal hierarchy. The allowed values for the Majorana effective mass, probed by 0{\nu}{\beta}{\beta}, turn out to be < 75meV at 3{\sigma}C.L. and lower down to less than 20meV at 1{\sigma}C.L.. If this indication is confirmed, the impact on the 0{\nu}{\beta}{\beta} experiments will be tremendous since the possibility of detecting a signal will be out of the reach of the next generation of experiments.
  • By means of zoom-in hydrodynamic simulations we quantify the amount of neutral hydrogen (HI) hosted by groups and clusters of galaxies. Our simulations, which are based on an improved formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), include radiative cooling, star formation, metal enrichment and supernova feedback, and can be split in two different groups, depending on whether feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is turned on or off. Simulations are analyzed to account for HI self-shielding and the presence of molecular hydrogen. We find that the mass in neutral hydrogen of dark matter halos monotonically increases with the halo mass and can be well described by a power-law of the form $M_{\rm HI}(M,z)\propto M^{3/4}$. Our results point out that AGN feedback reduces both the total halo mass and its HI mass, although it is more efficient in removing HI. We conclude that AGN feedback reduces the neutral hydrogen mass of a given halo by $\sim50\%$, with a weak dependence on halo mass and redshift. The spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen within halos is also affected by AGN feedback, whose effect is to decrease the fraction of HI that resides in the halo inner regions. By extrapolating our results to halos not resolved in our simulations we derive astrophysical implications from the measurements of $\Omega_{\rm HI}(z)$: halos with circular velocities larger than $\sim25~{\rm km/s}$ are needed to host HI in order to reproduce observations. We find that only the model with AGN feedback is capable of reproducing the value of $\Omega_{\rm HI}b_{\rm HI}$ derived from available 21cm intensity mapping observations.