• We introduce a new framework for efficient sampling from complex probability distributions, using a combination of optimal transport maps and the Metropolis-Hastings rule. The core idea is to use continuous transportation to transform typical Metropolis proposal mechanisms (e.g., random walks, Langevin methods) into non-Gaussian proposal distributions that can more effectively explore the target density. Our approach adaptively constructs a lower triangular transport map-an approximation of the Knothe-Rosenblatt rearrangement-using information from previous MCMC states, via the solution of an optimization problem. This optimization problem is convex regardless of the form of the target distribution. It is solved efficiently using a Newton method that requires no gradient information from the target probability distribution; the target distribution is instead represented via samples. Sequential updates enable efficient and parallelizable adaptation of the map even for large numbers of samples. We show that this approach uses inexact or truncated maps to produce an adaptive MCMC algorithm that is ergodic for the exact target distribution. Numerical demonstrations on a range of parameter inference problems show order-of-magnitude speedups over standard MCMC techniques, measured by the number of effectively independent samples produced per target density evaluation and per unit of wallclock time.
  • In many inverse problems, model parameters cannot be precisely determined from observational data. Bayesian inference provides a mechanism for capturing the resulting parameter uncertainty, but typically at a high computational cost. This work introduces a multiscale decomposition that exploits conditional independence across scales, when present in certain classes of inverse problems, to decouple Bayesian inference into two stages: (1) a computationally tractable coarse-scale inference problem; and (2) a mapping of the low-dimensional coarse-scale posterior distribution into the original high-dimensional parameter space. This decomposition relies on a characterization of the non-Gaussian joint distribution of coarse- and fine-scale quantities via optimal transport maps. We demonstrate our approach on a sequence of inverse problems arising in subsurface flow, using the multiscale finite element method to discretize the steady state pressure equation. We compare the multiscale strategy with full-dimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo on a problem of moderate dimension (100 parameters) and then use it to infer a conductivity field described by over 10,000 parameters.
  • We present the fundamentals of a measure transport approach to sampling. The idea is to construct a deterministic coupling---i.e., a transport map---between a complex "target" probability measure of interest and a simpler reference measure. Given a transport map, one can generate arbitrarily many independent and unweighted samples from the target simply by pushing forward reference samples through the map. We consider two different and complementary scenarios: first, when only evaluations of the unnormalized target density are available, and second, when the target distribution is known only through a finite collection of samples. We show that in both settings the desired transports can be characterized as the solutions of variational problems. We then address practical issues associated with the optimization--based construction of transports: choosing finite-dimensional parameterizations of the map, enforcing monotonicity, quantifying the error of approximate transports, and refining approximate transports by enriching the corresponding approximation spaces. Approximate transports can also be used to "Gaussianize" complex distributions and thus precondition conventional asymptotically exact sampling schemes. We place the measure transport approach in broader context, describing connections with other optimization--based samplers, with inference and density estimation schemes using optimal transport, and with alternative transformation--based approaches to simulation. We also sketch current work aimed at the construction of transport maps in high dimensions, exploiting essential features of the target distribution (e.g., conditional independence, low-rank structure). The approaches and algorithms presented here have direct applications to Bayesian computation and to broader problems of stochastic simulation.