• We report the discovery of HE 0430-2457, the first extremely low-mass pre-white dwarf (ELM pre-WD) in a long period binary (P = 771 +- 3 d). The spectroscopic parameters of the primary are determined to be Teff = 26200 +- 1500 K and logg = 5.40 +- 0.35, placing it in the region occupied by core He-burning hot subdwarf B stars. By comparing the spectroscopic parameters of the K-type companion to stellar models, and using the mass ratio, the mass of the hot primary is determined to be 0.23 Msun. Given that this is too low for core He-burning, the primary in HE 0430-2457 is not an EHB star but a pre WD of the ELM type. As the lifetime of ELM pre-WDs in this region of the HR diagram populated by EHBs is thought to be very short, they are not considered to be part of the observed EHBs. However, the discovery of this system indicates that the percentage of ELM pre-WDs in the observed EHB population might be higher than previously thought. Binary evolution models indicate that HE 0430-2457 is likely formed by a merger of the inner binary in a hierarchical triple system.
  • About a dozen substellar companions orbiting young stellar objects or pre-main sequence stars at several hundred au have been identified in the last decade. These objects are interesting both due to the uncertainties surrounding their formation, and because their large separation from the host star offers the potential to study the atmospheres of young giant planets and brown dwarfs. Here, we present X-shooter spectroscopy of SR 12 C, a $\sim\,2\,$Myrs young brown dwarf orbiting SR 12 at an orbital separation of 1083 au. We determine the spectral type, gravity, and effective temperature via comparison with models and observational templates of young brown dwarfs. In addition, we detect and characterize accretion using several accretion tracers. We find SR 12 C to be a brown dwarf of spectral type L0 $\pm$ 1, $\log$ g = 4 $\pm$ 0.5, an effective temperature of 2600 $\pm$ 100 K. Our spectra provide clear evidence for accretion at a rate of $\sim$ $10^{-10}$ $M_{\odot}yr^{-1}$. This makes SR 12 one of the few sub-stellar companions with a reliable estimate for its accretion rate. A comparison of the ages and accretion rates of sub-stellar companions with young isolated brown dwarfs does not reveal any significant differences. If further accretion rate measurements of a large number of substellar companions can confirm this trend, this would hint towards a similar formation mechanism for substellar companions at large separations and isolated brown dwarfs.
  • We present ALMA 1.3 mm continuum observations at 0.2" (25 au) resolution of Elias 2-24, one of the largest and brightest protoplanetary disks in the Ophiuchus Molecular Cloud, and report the presence of three partially resolved concentric gaps located at ~20, 52, and 87 au from the star. We perform radiative transfer modeling of the disk to constrain its surface density and temperature radial profile and place the disk structure in the context of mechanisms capable of forming narrow gaps such as condensation fronts and dynamical clearing by actively forming planets. In particular, we estimate the disk temperature at the locations of the gaps to be 23, 15, and 12 K (at 20, 52, and 87 au respectively), very close to the expected snow-lines of CO (23-28 K) and N2 (12-15 K). Similarly, by assuming that the widths of the gaps correspond to 4-8 x the Hill radii of forming planets (as suggested by numerical simulations), we estimate planet masses in the range of 0.2-1.5 M_Jup, 1.0-8.0 M_Jup, and 0.02-0.15 M_Jup for the inner, middle, and outer gap, respectively. Given the surface density profile of the disk, the amount of "missing mass" at the location of each one of these gaps (between 4 and 20 M_Jup) is more than sufficient to account for the formation of such planets.
  • DH Tau is a young ($\sim$1 Myr) classical T Tauri star. It is one of the few young PMS stars known to be associated with a planetary mass companion, DH Tau b, orbiting at large separation and detected by direct imaging. DH Tau b is thought to be accreting based on copious H${\alpha}$ emission and exhibits variable Paschen Beta emission. NOEMA observations at 230 GHz allow us to place constraints on the disk dust mass for both DH Tau b and the primary in a regime where the disks will appear optically thin. We estimate a disk dust mass for the primary, DH Tau A of $17.2\pm1.7\,M_{\oplus}$, which gives a disk-to-star mass ratio of 0.014 (assuming the usual Gas-to-Dust mass ratio of 100 in the disk). We find a conservative disk dust mass upper limit of 0.42$M_{\oplus}$ for DH Tau b, assuming that the disk temperature is dominated by irradiation from DH Tau b itself. Given the environment of the circumplanetary disk, variable illumination from the primary or the equilibrium temperature of the surrounding cloud would lead to even lower disk mass estimates. A MCFOST radiative transfer model including heating of the circumplanetary disk by DH Tau b and DH Tau A suggests that a mass averaged disk temperature of 22 K is more realistic, resulting in a dust disk mass upper limit of 0.09$M_{\oplus}$ for DH Tau b. We place DH Tau b in context with similar objects and discuss the consequences for planet formation models.
  • In this third of a series of papers related to cataclysmic variables (CVs) and related objects, we analyse the population of CVs in a set of 12 globular cluster models evolved with the MOCCA Monte Carlo code, for two initial binary populations (IBPs), two choices of common-envelope phase (CEP) parameters, and three different models for the evolution of CVs and the treatment of angular momentum loss. When more realistic models and parameters are considered, we find that present-day cluster CV duty cycles are extremely-low ($\lesssim 0.1$ per cent) which makes their detection during outbursts rather difficult. Additionally, the IBP plays a significant role in shaping the CV population properties, and models that follow the Kroupa IBP are less affected by enhanced angular momentum loss. We also predict from our simulations that CVs formed dynamically in the past few Gyr (massive CVs) correspond to bright CVs (as expected), and that faint CVs formed several Gyr ago (dynamically or not) represent the overwhelming majority. Regarding the CV formation rate, we rule out the notion that it is similar irrespective of the cluster properties. Finally, we discuss the differences in the present-day CV properties related to the IBPs, the initial cluster conditions, the CEP parameters, formation channels, the CV evolution models, and the angular momentum loss treatments.
  • A snow-line is the region of a protoplanetary disk at which a major volatile, such as water or carbon monoxide, reaches its condensation temperature. Snow-lines play a crucial role in disk evolution by promoting the rapid growth of ice-covered grains. Signatures of the carbon monoxide snow-line (at temperatures of around 20 kelvin) have recently been imaged in the disks surrounding the pre-main-sequence stars TW Hydra and HD163296, at distances of about 30 astronomical units (au) from the star. But the water snow-line of a protoplanetary disk (at temperatures of more than 100 kelvin) has not hitherto been seen, as it generally lies very close to the star (less than 5 au away for solar-type stars). Water-ice is important because it regulates the efficiency of dust and planetesimal coagulation, and the formation of comets, ice giants and the cores of gas giants. Here we report ALMA images at 0.03-arcsec resolution (12 au) of the protoplanetary disk around V883 Ori, a protostar of 1.3 solar masses that is undergoing an outburst in luminosity arising from a temporary increase in the accretion rate. We find an intensity break corresponding to an abrupt change in the optical depth at about 42 au, where the elevated disk temperature approaches the condensation point of water, from which we conclude that the outburst has moved the water snow-line. The spectral behaviour across the snow-line confirms recent model predictions: dust fragmentation and the inhibition of grain growth at higher temperatures results in soaring grain number densities and optical depths. As most planetary systems are expected to experience outbursts caused by accretion during their formation our results imply that highly dynamical water snow-lines must be considered when developing models of disk evolution and planet formation.
  • Eclipse timing variations observed from the post common-envelope binary (PCEB) NN Ser offer strong evidence in favour of circumbinary planets existing around PCEBs. If real, these planets may be accompanied by a disc of dust. We here present the ALMA detection of flux at 1.3 mm from NN Ser, which is likely due to thermal emission from a dust disc of mass $\sim0.8\pm0.2\,M_{\oplus}$. We performed simulations of the history of NN Ser to determine possible origins of this dust, and conclude that the most likely origin is, in fact, common-envelope material which was not expelled from the system and instead formed a circumbinary disc. These discs have been predicted by theory but previously remained undetected. While the presence of this dust does not prove the existence of planets around NN Ser, it adds credibility to the possibility of planets forming from common-envelope material in a 'second-generation' scenario.
  • A central hypothesis in the theory of cataclysmic variable (CV) evolution is the need to explain the observed lack of accreting systems in the ~2-3 h orbital period range, known as the period gap. The standard model, disrupted magnetic braking (DMB), reproduces the gap by postulating that CVs transform into inconspicuous detached white dwarf (WD) plus main sequence (MS) systems, which no longer resemble CVs. However, observational evidence for this standard model is currently indirect and thus this scenario has attracted some criticism throughout the last decades. Here we perform a simple but exceptionally strong test of the existence of detached CVs (dCVs). If the theory is correct dCVs should produce a peak in the orbital period distribution of detached close binaries consisting of a WD and an M4-M6 secondary star. We measured six new periods which brings the sample of such binaries with known periods below 10 h to 52 systems. An increase of systems in the ~2-3 h orbital period range is observed. Comparing this result with binary population models we find that the observed peak can not be reproduced by PCEBs alone and that the existence of dCVs is needed to reproduce the observations. Also, the WD mass distribution in the gap shows evidence of two populations in this period range, i.e. PCEBs and more massive dCVs, which is not observed at longer periods. We therefore conclude that CVs are indeed crossing the gap as detached systems, which provides strong support for the DMB theory.
  • The observed orbital period distribution of cataclysmic variables (CVs), the space density derived from observations, and the observed orbital period minimum are known to disagree with theoretical predictions since decades. More recently, the white dwarf (WD) masses in CVs have been found to significantly exceed those of single WDs, which is in contrast to theoretical expectations as well. We here claim that all these problems are related and can be solved if CVs with low-mass white dwarfs are driven into dynamically unstable mass transfer due to consequential angular momentum loss (CAML). Indeed, assuming CAML increases as a function of decreasing white dwarf mass can bring into agreement the predictions of binary population models and the observed properties of the CV population. We speculate that a common envelope like evolution of CVs with low-mass WDs following a nova eruption might be the physical process behind our empirical prescription of CAML.
  • The average white dwarf (WD) masses in cataclysmic variables (CVs) have been measured to significantly exceed those of single WDs, which is the opposite of what is theoretically expected. We present the results of binary population synthesis models taking into account consequential angular momentum loss (CAML) that is assumed to increase with decreasing WD mass. This approach can not only solve the WD mass problem, but also brings in agreement theoretical predictions and observations of the orbital period distribution and the space density of CVs. We speculate that frictional angular momentum loss following nova eruptions might cause such CAML and could thus be the missing ingredient of CV evolution.
  • It is thought that planetary mass companions may form through gravitational disk instabilities or core accretion. Identifying such objects in the process of formation would provide the most direct test for the competing formation theories. One of the most promising candidates for a planetary mass object still in formation is the third object in the FW Tau system. We here present ALMA cycle 1 observations confirming the recently published 1.3 mm detection of a dust disk around this third object and present for the first time a clear detection of a single peak $^{12}$CO (2-1) line, providing direct evidence for the simultaneous existence of a gas disk. We perform radiative transfer modeling of the third object in FW Tau and find that current observations are consistent with either a brown dwarf embedded in an edge-on disk or a planet embedded in a low inclination disk, which is externally irradiated by the binary companion. Further observations with ALMA, aiming for high SNR detections of non contaminated gas lines, are required to conclusively unveil the nature of the third object in FW Tau.
  • We present a new algorithm designed to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of point and extended source detections in direct imaging data. The novel part of our method is that it finds the linear combination of the science images that best match counterpart images with signal removed from suspected source regions. The algorithm, based on the Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI) method, is called Matched LOCI or MLOCI. We show using data obtained with the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) and Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) that the new algorithm can improve the SNR of point source detections by 30-400% over past methods. We also find no increase in false detections rates. No prior knowledge of candidate companion locations is required to use MLOCI. While non-blind applications may yield linear combinations of science images which seem to increase the SNR of true sources by a factor > 2, they can also yield false detections at high rates. This is a potential pitfall when trying to confirm marginal detections or to re-detect point sources found in previous epochs. Our findings are relevant to any method where the coefficients of the linear combination are considered tunable, e.g. LOCI and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Thus we recommend that false detection rates be analyzed when using these techniques.
  • Context : The properties of the inner disks of bright Herbig AeBe stars have been studied with near infrared (NIR) interferometry and high resolution spectroscopy. The continuum and a few molecular gas species have been studied close to the central star; however, sensitivity problems limit direct information about the inner disks of the fainter T Tauri stars. Aims : Our aim is to measure some of the properties of the inner regions of disks surrounding southern T Tauri stars. Methods : We performed a survey with the PIONIER recombiner instrument at H-band of 21 T Tauri stars. The baselines used ranged from 11 m to 129 m, corresponding to a maximum resolution of 3mas (0.45 au at 150 pc). Results : Thirteen disks are resolved well and the visibility curves are fully sampled as a function of baseline in the range 45-130 m for these 13 objects. A simple qualitative examination of visibility profiles allows us to identify a rapid drop-off in the visibilities at short baselines in 8 resolved disks. This is indicative of a significant contribution from an extended contribution of light from the disk. We demonstrate that this component is compatible with scattered light, providing strong support to a prediction made by Pinte et al. (2008). The amplitude of the drop-off and the amount of dust thermal emission changes from source to source suggesting that each disk is different. A by-product of the survey is the identification of a new milli-arcsec separation binary: WW Cha. Spectroscopic and interferometric data of AK Sco have also been fitted with a binary and disk model. Conclusions : Visibility data are reproduced well when thermal emission and scattering form dust are fully considered. The inner radii measured are consistent with the expected dust sublimation radii. Modelling of AK Sco suggests a likely coplanarity between the disk and the binary's orbital plane
  • Maren Hempel, Dante Minniti, István Dékány, Roberto K. Saito, Philip W. Lucas, Jim Emerson, Andrea V. Ahumada, Suzanne Aigrain, Maria Victoria Alonso, Javier Alonso-García, Eduardo B. Amôres, Rodolfo Angeloni, Julia Arias, Reba Bandyopadhyay, Rodolfo H. Barbá, Beatriz Barbuy, Gustavo Baume, Juan Carlos Beamin, Luigi Bedin, Eduardo Bica, Jordanka Borissova, Leonardo Bronfman, Giovanni Carraro, Márcio Catelan, Juan J. Clariá, Carlos Contreras, Nicholas Cross, Christopher Davis, Richard de Grijs, Janet E. Drew, Cecilia Fariña, Carlos Feinstein, Eduardo Fernández Lajús, Stuart Folkes, Roberto C. Gamen, Douglas Geisler, Wolfgang Gieren, Bertrand Goldman, Oscar González, Andrew Gosling, Guillermo Gunthardt, Sebastian Gurovich, Nigel C. Hambly, Margaret Hanson, Melvin Hoare, Mike J. Irwin, Valentin D. Ivanov, Andrés Jordán, Eamonn Kerins, Karen Kinemuchi, Radostin Kurtev, Andy Longmore, Martin López-Corredoira, Tom Maccarone, Eduardo Martín, Nicola Masetti, Ronald E. Mennickent, David Merlo, Maria Messineo, I. Félix Mirabel, Lorenzo Monaco, Christian Moni Bidin, Lorenzo Morelli, Nelson Padilla, Tali Palma, Maria Celeste Parisi, Quentin Parker, Daniela Pavani, Pawel Pietrukowicz, Grzegorz Pietrzynski, Giuliano Pignata, Marina Rejkuba, Alejandra Rojas, Alexandre Roman-Lopes, Maria Teresa Ruiz, Stuart E. Sale, Ivo Saviane, Matthias R. Schreiber, Anja C. Schröder, Saurabh Sharma, Michael Smith, Laerte Sodré Jr., Mario Soto, Andrew W. Stephens, Motohide Tamura, Claus Tappert, Mark A. Thompson, Ignacio Toledo, Elena Valenti, Leonardo Vanzi, Walter Weidmann, Manuela Zoccali
    June 12, 2014 astro-ph.IM
    The VISTA Variables in the V\'ia L\'actea (VVV) survey is one of six public ESO surveys, and is now in its 4th year of observing. Although far from being complete, the VVV survey has already delivered many results, some directly connected to the intended science goals (detection of variables stars, microlensing events, new star clusters), others concerning more exotic objects, e.g. novae. Now, at the end of the fourth observing period, and comprising roughly 50% of the proposed observations, the actual status of the survey, as well some of the results based on the VVV data, are presented.
  • Gaseous giant planet formation is thought to occur in the first few million years following stellar birth. Models predict that giant planet formation carves a deep gap in the dust component (shallower in the gas). Infrared observations of the disk around the young star HD142527, at ~140pc, found an inner disk ~10AU in radius, surrounded by a particularly large gap, with a disrupted outer disk beyond 140AU, indicative of a perturbing planetary-mass body at ~90 AU. From radio observations, the bulk mass is molecular and lies in the outer disk, whose continuum emission has a horseshoe morphology. The vigorous stellar accretion rate would deplete the inner disk in less than a year, so in order to sustain the observed accretion, matter must flow from the outer-disk into the cavity and cross the gap. In dynamical models, the putative protoplanets channel outer-disk material into gap-crossing bridges that feed stellar accretion through the inner disk. Here we report observations with the Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA) that reveal diffuse CO gas inside the gap, with denser HCO+ gas along gap-crossing filaments, and that confirm the horseshoe morphology of the outer disk. The estimated flow rate of the gas is in the range 7E-9 to 2E-7 Msun/yr, which is sufficient to maintain accretion onto the star at the present rate.
  • We present deep Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM) observations obtained with the ESO Very Large Telescope of the pre-transitional disk object FL Cha (SpT=K8, d=160 pc), the disk of which is known to have a wide optically thin gap separating optically thick inner and outer disk components. We find non-zero closure phases, indicating a significant flux asymmetry in the K-band emission (e.g., a departure from a single point source detection). We also present radiative transfer modeling of the SED of the FL Cha system and find that the gap extends from ~0.06 to ~8.3 AU. We demonstrate that the non-zero closure phases can be explained almost equally well by starlight scattered off the inner edge of the outer disk or by a (sub)stellar companion. Single-epoch, single-wavelength SAM observations of transitional disks with large cavities that could become resolved should thus be interpreted with caution, taking the disk and its properties into consideration. In the context of a binary model, the signal is most consistent with a high-contrast (delta_K ~4.8 mag) source at a ~40 mas (6 AU) projected separation. However, the flux ratio and separation parameters remain highly degenerate and a much brighter source (deta_K ~1 mag) at 15 mas (2.4 AU) can also reproduce the signal. Second-epoch, multi-wavelength observations are needed to establish the nature of the SAM detection in FL Cha.
  • We present continuum high resolution Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the transition disk object RX J1633.9-2442, which is located in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud and has recently been identified as a likely site of ongoing giant planet formation. The observations were taken at 340 GHz (880 micron) with the SMA in its most extended configuration, resulting in an angular resolution of 0.3" (35 AU at the distance of the target). We find that the disk is highly inclined (i ~50 deg) and has an inner cavity ~25 AU in radius, which is clearly resolved by our observations. We simultaneously model the entire optical to millimeter wavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) and SMA visibilities of RX J1633.9-2442 in order to constrain the structure of its disk. We find that an empty cavity ~25 AU in radius is inconsistent with the excess emission observed at 12, 22, and 24 micron. Instead, the mid-IR excess can be modeled by either a narrow, optically thick ring at ~10 AU or an optically thin region extending from ~7 AU to ~25 AU. The inner disk (r < 5 AU) is mostly depleted of small dust grains as attested by the lack of detectable near-IR excess. We also present deep Keck aperture masking observations in the near-IR, which rule out the presence of a companion up to 500 times fainter than the primary star (in K-band) for projected separations in the 5-20 AU range. We argue that the complex structure of the RX J1633.9-2442 disk is best explained by multiple planets embedded within the disk. We also suggest that the properties and incidence of objects such as RX J1633.9-2442, T Cha, and LkCa 15 (and those of the companions recently identified to these two latter objects) are most consistent with the runaway gas accretion phase of the core accretion model, when giant planets gain their envelopes and suddenly become massive enough to open wide gaps in the disk.
  • Transition disk objects are pre-main-sequence stars with little or no near-IR excess and significant far-IR excess, implying inner opacity holes in their disks. Here we present a multifrequency study of transition disk candidates located in Lupus I, III, IV, V, VI, Corona Australis, and Scorpius. Complementing the information provided by Spitzer with adaptive optics (AO) imaging (NaCo, VLT), submillimeter photometry (APEX), and echelle spectroscopy (Magellan, Du Pont Telescopes), we estimate the multiplicity, disk mass, and accretion rate for each object in our sample in order to identify the mechanism potentially responsible for its inner hole. We find that our transition disks show a rich diversity in their spectral energy distribution morphology, have disk masses ranging from lsim1 to 10 M JUP, and accretion rates ranging from lsim10-11 to 10-7.7 M \odot yr-1. Of the 17 bona fide transition disks in our sample, three, nine, three, and two objects are consistent with giant planet formation, grain growth, photoevaporation, and debris disks, respectively. Two disks could be circumbinary, which offers tidal truncation as an alternative origin of the inner hole. We find the same heterogeneity of the transition disk population in Lupus III, IV, and Corona Australis as in our previous analysis of transition disks in Ophiuchus while all transition disk candidates selected in Lupus V, VI turned out to be contaminating background asymptotic giant branch stars. All transition disks classified as photoevaporating disks have small disk masses, which indicates that photoevaporation must be less efficient than predicted by most recent models. The three systems that are excellent candidates for harboring giant planets potentially represent invaluable laboratories to study planet formation with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array.
  • As part of an ongoing program aiming to characterize a large number of Spitzer-selected transition disks (disks with reduced levels of near-IR and/or mid- IR excess emission), we have obtained (sub)millimeter wavelength photometry, high-resolution optical spectroscopy, and adaptive optics near-infrared imaging for a sample of 31 transition objects located in the Perseus, Taurus, and Auriga molecular clouds. We use these ground-based data to estimate disk masses, multiplicity, and accretion rates in order to investigate the mechanisms potentially responsible for their inner holes. Following our previous studies in other regions, we combine disk masses, accretion rates and multiplicity data with other information, such as SED morphology and fractional disk luminosity to classify the disks as strong candidates for the following categories: grain-growth dominated disks (7 objects), giant planet-forming disks (6 objects), photoevaporating disks (7 objects), debris disks (11 objects), and cicumbinary disks (1 object, which was also classified as a photoeavaporating disk). Combining our sample of 31 transition disks with those from our previous studies results in a sample of 74 transition objects that have been selected, characterized, and classified in an homogenous way. We discuss this combined high-quality sample in the context of the current paradigm of the evolution and dissipation of protoplanetary disks and use its properties to constrain different aspects of the key processes driving their evolution. We find that the age distribution of disks that are likely to harbor recently formed giant planets favors core accretion as the main planet formation mechanism and a ~2-3 Myr formation timescale
  • This paper completes the series of cataclysmic variables (CVs) identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey I/II. The coordinates, magnitudes and spectra of 33 CVs are presented. Among the 33 are eight systems known previous to SDSS (CT Ser, DO Leo, HK Leo, IR Com, V849 Her, V405 Peg, PG1230+226 and HS0943+1404), as well as nine objects recently found through various photometric surveys. Among the systems identified since the SDSS are two polar candidates, two intermediate polar candidates and one candidate for containing a pulsating white dwarf. Our followup data have confirmed a polar candidate from Paper VII and determined tentative periods for three of the newly identified CVs. A complete summary table of the 285 CVs with spectra from SDSS I/II is presented as well as a link to an online table of all known CVs from both photometry and spectroscopy that will continue to be updated as future data appear.
  • We have obtained millimeter wavelength photometry, high-resolution optical spectroscopy and adaptive optics near-infrared imaging for a sample of 26 Spitzer-selected transition circumstellar disks. All of our targets are located in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud (d ~125 pc) and have Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) suggesting the presence of inner opacity holes. We use these ground-based data to estimate the disk mass, multiplicity, and accretion rate for each object in our sample in order to investigate the mechanisms potentially responsible for their inner holes. We find that transition disks are a heterogeneous group of objects, with disk masses ranging from < 0.6 to 40 M_JUP and accretion rates ranging from <1E-11 1E-7 M_solar/yr, but most tend to have much lower masses and accretion rates than "full disks" (i.e., disks without opacity holes). Eight of our targets have stellar companions: 6 of them are binaries and the other 2 are triple systems. In four cases, the stellar companions are close enough to suspect they are responsible for the inferred inner holes. We find that 9 of our 26 targets have low disk mass (< 2.5 M_JUP) and negligible accretion (< 1E-11) M_solar/yr, and are thus consistent with photoevaporating (or photoevaporated) disks. Four of these 9 non-accreting objects have fractional disk luminosities < 1E-3 and could already be in a debris disk stage. Seventeen of our transition disks are accreting. Thirteen of these accreting objects are consistent with grain growth. The remaining 4 accreting objects have SEDs suggesting the presence of sharp inner holes, and thus are excellent candidates for harboring giant planets.
  • Coordinates, magnitudes and spectra are presented for 39 cataclysmic variables found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra that were primarily obtained in 2006. Of these, 12 were CVs identified prior to the SDSS spectra (GY Cnc, GO Com, ST LMi, NY Ser, MR Ser, QW Ser, EU UMa, IY UMa, HS1340+1524, RXJ1610.1+0352, Boo 1, Leo 5). Follow-up spectroscopic observations of seven systems (including one from year 2005 and another from year 2004) were obtained, resulting in estimates of the orbital periods for 3 objects. The new CVs include two candidates for high inclination, eclipsing systems, 4 new Polars and three systems whose spectra clearly reveal atmospheric absorption lines from the underlying white dwarf.
  • Since the Fine Guiding Sensor (FGS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was used to measure the distance to SS Cyg to be $166\pm12$ pc, it became apparent that at this distance the disc instability model fails to explain the absolute magnitude during outburst. It remained, however, an open question whether the model or the distance have to be revised. Recent observations led to a revision of the system parameters of SS Cyg and seem to be consistent with a distance of $d\gta 140$ pc. We re-discuss the problem taking into account the new binary and stellar parameters measured for SS Cyg. We confront not only the observations with the predictions of the disc instability model but also compare SS Cyg with other dwarf novae and nova-like systems. We assume the disc during outburst to be in a quasi stationary state and use the black-body approximation to estimate the accretion rate during outburst as a function of distance. Using published analysis of the long term light curve we determine the mean mass transfer rate of SS Cyg as a function of distance and compare the result with mass transfer rates derived for other dwarf novae and nova-like systems. At a distance of $d\gta 140$ pc, both the accretion rate during outburst as well as the mean mass transfer rate of SS Cyg contradict the disc instability model. More important, at such distances we find the mean mass transfer rate of SS Cyg to be higher or comparable to those derived for nova-like systems. Our findings show that a distance to SS Cyg $\gta 140$ pc contradicts the main concepts developed for accretion discs in cataclysmic variables during the last 30 years. Either our current picture of disc accretion in these systems must be revised or the distance to SS Cyg is $\sim 100$ pc
  • Although its well determined mass ratio of $q=\Msec/\Mwd=0.357\pm0.007$ should avoid superoutbursts according to the thermal tidal instability model, the prototypical dwarf nova U Gem experienced in 1985 an extraordinary long outburst resembling very much superoutbursts observed in SU UMa systems. Recently, the situation for the model became even worse as superhump detections have been reported for the 1985 outburst of U Gem. The superhump signal is noisy and the evidence provided by simple periodograms seems to be weak. Therefore and because of the importance for our understanding of superoutbursts and superhumps, we determine the statistical significance of the recently published detection of superhumps in the AAVSO light curve of the famous long 1985 outburst of U Gem. Using Lomb-Scargle periodograms, analysis of variance (AoV), and Monte-Carlo methods we analyse the 160 visual magnitudes obtained by the AAVSO during the outburst and relate our analyse to previous superhump detections. The 160 data points of the outburst alone do not contain a statistically significant period. However, using additionally the characteristics of superhumps detected previously in other SU UMa systems and searching only for signals that are consistent with these, we derive a $2\sigma$ significance for the superhump signal. The alleged appearance of an additional superhump at the end of the outbursts appears to be statistically insignificant. Although of weak statistical significance, the superhump signal of the long 1985 outburst of U Gem can be interpreted as further indication for the SU UMa nature of this outburst. This further contradicts the tidal instability model as the explanation for the superhump phenomenon.
  • We discuss the multi-wavelength predictions of the two models proposed for SU UMa stars, i.e the enhanced mass transfer (EMT) and the tidal thermal instability (TTI) models. We focus on the systematic differences of the suggested scenarios before discussing the model predictions together with the observations of the best-studied SU UMa system, VW Hyi. We find that assuming the standard form of the viscosity parameter alpha, both models predict only outbursts being triggered at the inner edge of the accretion disc. In the TTI model the superoutbursts are triggered when the outer radius of the disc reaches a certain value, i.e. the 3:1 resonance radius. In contrast, the EMT scenario predicts superoutbursts when the disc mass exceeds a critical value. This causes the EMT model to be much more sensitive to mass transfer variations than the TTI model. In both models we find the predicted UV and EUV delays in agreement with the observations of VW Hyi for alpha_hot/alpha_cold<=4. In addition both models can generate precursor outbursts which are more pronounced at short wavelengths, in agreement with observations. Variations found in the observed light curve of single systems (e.g. VW Hyi) as well as the difference between ordinary SU UMa stars and ER UMa systems are a natural outcome of the EMT model while the TTI model fails to explain them.