• In the classical work by Irving and Zwanzig [Irving J.H. and Zwanzig R.W., J. Chem. Phys. 19 (1951), 1173-1180 ] it has been shown that quantum observables for macroscopic density, momentum and energy satisfy the conservation laws of fluid dynamics. This work derives the corresponding classical molecular dynamics limit by extending Irving and Zwanzig's result to matrix-valued potentials for a general quantum particle system. The matrix formulation provides the semi-classical limit of the quantum observables in the conservation laws, also in the case where the temperature is large compared to the electron eigenvalue gaps. The classical limit of the quantum observables in the conservation laws is useful in order to determine the constitutive relations for the stress tensor and the heat flux by molecular dynamics simulations. The main new steps to obtain the molecular dynamics limit is to: (i) approximate the dynamics of quantum observables accurately by classical dynamics, by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian using a non linear eigenvalue problem, (ii) define the local energy density by partitioning a general potential, applying perturbation analysis of the electron eigenvalue problem, (iii) determine the molecular dynamics stress tensor and heat flux in the case of several excited electron states, and (iv) construct the initial particle phase-space density as a local grand canonical quantum ensemble determined by the initial conservation variables.
  • It is known that ab initio molecular dynamics based on the electron ground state eigenvalue can be used to approximate quantum observables in the canonical ensemble when the temperature is low compared to the first electron eigenvalue gap. This work proves that a certain weighted average of the different ab initio dynamics, corresponding to each electron eigenvalue, approximates quantum observables for any temperature. The proof uses the semiclassical Weyl law to show that canonical quantum observables of nuclei-electron systems, based on matrix valued Hamiltonian symbols, can be approximated by ab initio molecular dynamics with the error proportional to the electron-nuclei mass ratio. The result covers observables that depend on time-correlations. A combination of the Hilbert-Schmidt inner product for quantum operators and Weyl's law shows that the error estimate holds for observables and Hamiltonian symbols that have three and five bounded derivatives, respectively, provided the electron eigenvalues are distinct for any nuclei position and the observables are in the diagonal form with respect to the electron eigenstates.
  • We derive computable error estimates for finite element approximations of linear elliptic partial differential equations (PDE) with rough stochastic coefficients. In this setting, the exact solutions contain high frequency content that standard a posteriori error estimates fail to capture. We propose goal-oriented estimates, based on local error indicators, for the pathwise Galerkin and expected quadrature errors committed in standard, continuous, piecewise linear finite element approximations. Derived using easily validated assumptions, these novel estimates can be computed at a relatively low cost and have applications to subsurface flow problems in geophysics where the conductivities are assumed to have lognormal distributions with low regularity. Our theory is supported by numerical experiments on test problems in one and two dimensions.
  • The difference of the values of observables for the time-independent Schroedinger equation, with matrix valued potentials, and the values of observables for ab initio Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, of the ground state, depends on the probability to be in excited states and the electron/nuclei mass ratio. The paper first proves an error estimate (depending on the electron/nuclei mass ratio and the probability to be in excited states) for this difference of microcanonical observables, assuming that molecular dynamics space-time averages converge, with a rate related to the maximal Lyapunov exponent. The error estimate is uniform in the number of particles and the analysis does not assume a uniform lower bound on the spectral gap of the electron operator and consequently the probability to be in excited states can be large. A numerical method to determine the probability to be in excited states is then presented, based on Ehrenfest molecular dynamics and stability analysis of a perturbed eigenvalue problem.
  • Ehrenfest and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics are computational alternatives to approximate Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics without solving the electron eigenvalue problem at each time-step. A non-trivial issue is to choose the artificial electron mass parameter appearing in the Car-Parrinello method to achieve both good accuracy and high computational efficiency. In this paper, we propose an algorithm, motivated by the Landau-Zener probability, to systematically choose an artificial mass dynamically, which makes the Car-Parrinello and Ehrenfest molecular dynamics methods dependent only on the problem data. Numerical experiments for simple model problems show that the time-dependent adaptive artificial mass parameter improves the efficiency of the Car-Parrinello and Ehrenfest molecular dynamics.
  • This work focuses on numerical solutions of optimal control problems. A time discretization error representation is derived for the approximation of the associated value function. It concerns Symplectic Euler solutions of the Hamiltonian system connected with the optimal control problem. The error representation has a leading order term consisting of an error density that is computable from Symplectic Euler solutions. Under an assumption of the pathwise convergence of the approximate dual function as the maximum time step goes to zero, we prove that the remainder is of higher order than the leading error density part in the error representation. With the error representation, it is possible to perform adaptive time stepping. We apply an adaptive algorithm originally developed for ordinary differential equations. The performance is illustrated by numerical tests.
  • In a previous paper it was shown that the Forward Euler method applied to differential inclusions where the right-hand side is a Lipschitz continuous set-valued function with uniformly bounded, compact values, converges with rate one. The convergence, which was there in the sense of reachable sets, is in this paper strengthened to the sense of convergence of solution paths. An improvement of the error constant is given for the case when the set-valued function consists of a small number of smooth ordinary functions.
  • The Symplectic Pontryagin method was introduced in a previous paper. This work shows that this method is applicable under less restrictive assumptions. Existence of solutions to the Symplectic Pontryagin scheme are shown to exist without the previous assumption on a bounded gradient of the discrete dual variable. The convergence proof uses the representation of solutions to a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation as the value function of an associated variation problem.
  • An optimal control problem related to the probability of transition between stable states for a thermally driven Ginzburg-Landau equation is considered. The value function for the optimal control problem with a spatial discretization is shown to converge quadratically to the value function for the original problem. This is done by using that the value functions solve similar Hamilton-Jacobi equations, the equation for the original problem being defined on an infinite dimensional Hilbert space. Time discretization is performed using the Symplectic Euler method. Imposing a reasonable condition this method is shown to be convergent of order one in time, with a constant independent of the spatial discretization.