• Galaxy clusters are the largest virialized structures in the observable Universe. The knowledge of their properties provides many useful astrophysical and cosmological information. Our aim is to derive the luminosity and stellar mass profiles of the nearby galaxy clusters of the Omega-WINGS survey and to study the main scaling relations valid for such systems. We have merged the data of the WINGS and Omega-WINGS databases, sorted the sources according to the distance from the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and calculated the integrated luminosity profiles in the $B$ and $V$ bands, taking into account extinction, photometric and spatial completeness, K-correction and background contribution. Then, by exploiting the spectroscopic sample we derived the stellar mass profiles of the clusters. We got the luminosity profiles of 46 galaxy clusters, reaching $r_{200}$ in 30 cases, and the stellar mass profiles of 42 of our objects. We successfully fitted all the integrated luminosity growth profiles with one or two embedded S\'ersic components, deriving the main clusters parameters. Finally, we checked the main scaling relation among the clusters parameters in comparison with those obtained for a selected sample of early-type galaxies (ETGs) of the same clusters. We found that the nearby galaxy clusters are non-homologous structures like ETGs and exhibit a color-magnitude (CM) red-sequence relation very similar to that observed for galaxies in clusters. These properties are not expected in the current cluster formation scenarios. In particular the existence of a CM relation for clusters, shown here for the first time, suggests that the baryonic structures grow and evolve in a similar way at all scales.
  • We investigate the evolution of the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD) from redshift z=20 to z=0 and compare it with the observational one by Madau and Dickinson derived from recent compilations of UV and IR data. The theoretical SFRD(z) and its evolution are obtained using a simple model which folds together the star formation histories of prototype galaxies designed to represent real objects of different morphological type along the Hubble sequence and the hierarchical growing of structures under the action of gravity from small perturbations to large scale objects in \Lambda-CDM cosmogony, i.e. the number density of dark matter halos N(M,z). Although the overall model is very simple and easy to set up, it provides results that well mimic those obtained from large scale N-body simulations of great complexity. The simplicity of our approach allows us to test different assumptions for the star formation law in galaxies, the effects of energy feedback from stars to interstellar gas and the efficiency of galactic winds, and also the effect of N(M,z). The result of our analysis is that in the framework of the hierarchical assembly of galaxies the so-called time-delayed star formation under plain assumptions mainly for the energy feedback and galactic winds can reproduce the observational SFRD(z).
  • In the context of the GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with Muse (GASP) survey, we present the characterization of JO204, a jellyfish galaxy in A957, a relatively low-mass cluster with $M=4.4 \times10^{14}M_\odot$. This galaxy shows a tail of ionized gas that extends up to 30 kpc from the main body in the opposite direction of the cluster center. No gas emission is detected in the galaxy outer disk, suggesting that gas stripping is proceeding outside-in. The stellar component is distributed as a regular disk galaxy; the stellar kinematics shows a symmetric rotation curve with a maximum radial velocity of 200km/s out to 20 kpc from the galaxy center. The radial velocity of the gas component in the central part of the disk follows the distribution of the stellar component; the gas kinematics in the tail retains the rotation of the galaxy disk, indicating that JO204 is moving at high speed in the intracluster medium. Both the emission and radial velocity maps of the gas and stellar components indicate ram-pressure as the most likely primary mechanism for gas stripping, as expected given that JO204 is close to the cluster center and it is likely at the first infall in the cluster. The spatially resolved star formation history of JO204 provides evidence that the onset of ram-pressure stripping occurred in the last 500 Myr, quenching the star formation activity in the outer disk, where the gas has been already completely stripped. Our conclusions are supported by a set of hydrodynamic simulations.
  • [Abridged] We use the WINGS database to select a sample of 67 nearby galaxy clusters with at least 30 spectroscopic members each. 53 of these clusters do not show evidence of substructures in phase-space, while 14 do. We estimate the virial radii and circular velocities of the 67 clusters by a variety of proxies (velocity dispersion, X-ray temperature, and richness) and use these estimates to build stack samples from these 53 and 14 clusters ('Reg' and 'Irr' stacks, respectively). We determine the number-density and velocity-dispersion profiles (VDPs) of E, S0, and Sp+Irr (S) galaxies in the Reg and Irr samples, separately, and fit models to these profiles. The number density profiles of E, S0, and S galaxies are adequately described by either a NFW or a cored King model, both for the Reg and Irr samples, with a slight preference for the NFW model. The spatial distribution concentration increases from the S to the S0 and to the E populations, both in the Reg and the Irr stacks, reflecting the well-known morphology-radius relation. Reg clusters have a more concentrated spatial distribution of E and S0 galaxies than Irr clusters, while the spatial distributions of S galaxies in Reg and Irr clusters are similar. We propose a new phenomenological model that provides acceptable fits to the VDP of all our galaxy samples. The VDPs become steeper and with a higher normalization from E to S0 to S galaxies. The S0 VDP is close to that of E galaxies in Reg clusters, and intermediate between those of E and S galaxies in Irr clusters. Our results suggest that S galaxies are a recently accreted cluster population, that take less than 3 Gyr to evolve into S0 galaxies after accretion, and in doing so modify their phase-space distribution, approaching that of cluster ellipticals. While in Reg clusters this evolutionary process is mostly completed, it is still ongoing in Irr clusters.
  • GASP (GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE) is a new integral-field spectroscopic survey with MUSE at the VLT aiming at studying gas removal processes in galaxies. We present an overview of the survey and show a first example of a galaxy undergoing strong gas stripping. GASP is obtaining deep MUSE data for 114 galaxies at z=0.04-0.07 with stellar masses in the range 10^9.2-10^11.5 M_sun in different environments (galaxy clusters and groups, over more than four orders of magnitude in halo mass). GASP targets galaxies with optical signatures of unilateral debris or tails reminiscent of gas stripping processes ("jellyfish galaxies"), as well as a control sample of disk galaxies with no morphological anomalies. GASP is the only existing Integral Field Unit (IFU) survey covering both the main galaxy body and the outskirts and surroundings, where the IFU data can reveal the presence and the origin of the outer gas. To demonstrate GASP's ability to probe the physics of gas and stars, we show the complete analysis of a textbook case of a "jellyfish" galaxy, JO206. This is a massive galaxy (9 x 10^10 M_sun in a low-mass cluster (sigma ~500 km/s), at a small projected clustercentric radius and a high relative velocity, with >=90kpc-long tentacles of ionized gas stripped away by ram pressure. We present the spatially resolved kinematics and physical properties of gas and stars, and depict the evolutionary history of this galaxy.
  • The aim of this work is to show that the origin of the Fundamental Plane (FP) relation for early-type galaxies (ETGs) can be traced back to the existence of a fine-tuning between the average star formation rate $<SFR>$ of galaxies and their structural and dynamical characteristics. To get such result it is necessary to imagine the existence of two distinct "virtual planes" for each galaxy in the $\log(R_e)-\log(I_e)-\log(\sigma)$ space. The first one (named Virial Plane VP) represents the total galaxy mass using the scalar Virial Theorem and the mass-to-light ratio $M/L$, while the second plane comes from an expression of the total galaxy luminosity as a function of the mean star formation rate $<SFR>$ and the velocity dispersion $\sigma$, through a relation $L=L'_0 \sigma^{-2}$ (named here pseudo-Faber-Jackson (PFJ)) which is a mathematical convenient way for expressing the independency of light from the virial equilibrium. Its validity can be connected to the mutual correlation $L\sim\sigma\sqrt{<SFR>}$ observed for all ETGs. A posteriori it is possible to see that this approach permits to explain the observed properties of the FP (tilt and scatter) and the Zone of Exclusions (ZOE) visible in the FP projections. Furthermore, the link between the properties of the FP and the SFR of galaxies provides a new idea of the star formation, as a phenomenon driven by the initial conditions of proto-galaxies and regulated across the whole cosmic history by the variation of the main galaxy parameters (mass, luminosity, structural shape and velocity dispersion).
  • The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses $M_\ast>10^{9.8}M_\odot$, drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M$_*$) in galaxy clusters at $0.04<z<0.07$. We use non-member galaxies at 0.02$<$z$<$0.09 as field control sample. Overall, we find agreement between the SFR-M$_*$ relation in the two environments, but detect a population of cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs which is rare in the field. These {\it transition} galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius ($R_{200}$) but they impact on the SFR-M$_*$ relation only within 0.6R$_{200}$. The ratio of transition to PSF galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R$_{200}$ and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with $M_*$. As galaxies move downward from the SFR-M$_*$ main sequence, they become redder and present older luminosity and mass weighted ages. These trends, together with the analysis of the star formation histories, suggest that transition galaxies have had a reduced SFR for the past 2-5 Gyr. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the interaction of galaxies with the intracluster medium via strangulation causes a gradual shut down of star formation, giving birth to an evolved population of galaxies in transition from being star forming to becoming passive.
  • We discuss the observational evidences of the morphological transformation of Spirals into S0 galaxies in the cluster environment exploiting two big databases of galaxy clusters: WINGS (0.04 < z < 0.07) and EDisCS (0.4 < z < 0.8). The most important results are: 1) the average number of S0 galaxies in clusters is almost a factor of $\sim 3 - 4$ larger today than at redshift $z \sim 1$; 2) the fraction of S0's to Spirals increases on average by a factor $\sim$ 2 every Gyr; 3) the average rate of transformation for Spirals (not considering the infall of new galaxies from the cosmic web) is: $\sim$ 5 Sp into S0's per Gyr and $\sim$ 2 Sp into E's per Gyr; 4) there are evidences that the interstellar gas of Spirals is stripped by an hot intergalactic medium; 5) there are also indirect hints that major/minor merging events have played a role in the transformation of Spiral galaxies. In particular, we show that: 1) the ratio between the number of S0's and Spirals (NS0/NSp) in the WINGS clusters is correlated with their X-ray luminosity $L_X$ ; 2) that the brightest and massive S0's are always close to the cluster center; 3) that the mean Sersic index of S0's is always larger than that of Spirals (and lower than E's) for galaxy stellar masses above $10^9.5$ Msun; 4) that the number of E's in clusters cannot be constant; 5) that the largest difference between the mean mass of S0's and E's with respect to Spirals is observed in clusters with low velocity dispersion. Finally, by comparing the properties of the various morphological types for galaxies in clusters and in the field, we find that the most significant effect of the environment is the stripping of the outer galaxy regions, resulting in a systematic difference in effective radius and Sersic index.
  • Highly accreting quasars are characterized by distinguishing properties in the 4D eigenvector 1 parameter space that make them easily recognizable over a broad range range of redshift and luminosity. The 4D eigenvector 1 approach allows us to define selection criteria that go beyond the restriction to Narrow Line Seyfert 1s identified at low redshift. These criteria are probably able to isolate sources with a defined physical structure i.e., a geometrically thick, optically thick advection-dominated accretion disk (a "slim" disk). We stress that the importance of highly accreting quasars goes beyond the understanding of the details of their physics: their Eddington ratio is expected to saturate toward values of order unity, making them possible cosmological probes.
  • Aims. We present the B-, V- and K-band surface photometry catalogs obtained running the automatic software GASPHOT on galaxies from the WINGS cluster survey having isophotal area larger than 200 pixels. The catalogs can be downloaded at the Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS). Methods. We outline the GASPHOT performances and compare our surface photometry with that obtained by SExtractor, GALFIT and GIM2D. This analysis is aimed at providing statistical information about the accuracy generally achieved by the softwares for automatic surface photometry of galaxies. Results. For each galaxy and for each photometric band the GASPHOT catalogs provide the parameters of the Sersic law best-fitting the luminosity profiles. They are: the sky coordinates of the galaxy center (R:A:; DEC:), the total magnitude (m), the semi-major axis of the effective isophote (Re), the Sersic index (n), the axis ratio (b=a) and a flag parameter (QFLAG) giving a global indication of the fit quality. The WINGS-GASPHOT database includes 41,463 galaxies in the B-band, 42,275 in the V-band, and 71,687 in the K-band. We find that the bright early-type galaxies have larger Sersic indices and effective radii, as well as redder colors in their center. In general the effective radii increase systematically from the K- to the V- and B-band. Conclusions. The GASPHOT photometry turns out to be in fairly good agreement with the surface photometry obtained by GALFIT and GIM2D, as well as with the aperture photometry provided by SExtractor. The main advantages of GASPHOT with respect to other tools are: (i) the automatic finding of the local PSF; (ii) the short CPU time of execution; (iii) the remarkable stability against the choice of the initial guess parameters. All these characteristics make GASPHOT an ideal tool for blind surface photometry of large galaxy samples in wide-field CCD mosaics.
  • We present a study of galaxy sizes in the local Universe as a function of galaxy environment, comparing clusters and the general field. Galaxies with radii and masses comparable to high-z massive and compact galaxies represent 4.4% of all galaxies more massive than 3 X 10^{10} M_sun in the field. Such galaxies are 3 times more frequent in clusters than in the field. Most of them are early-type galaxies with intermediate to old stellar populations. There is a trend of smaller radii for older luminosity-weighted ages at fixed galaxy mass. We show the relation between size and luminosity-weighted age for galaxies of different stellar masses and in different environments. We compare with high-z data to quantify the evolution of galaxy sizes. We find that, once the progenitor bias due to the relation between galaxy size and stellar age is removed, the average amount of size evolution of individual galaxies between high- and low-z is mild, of the order of a factor 1.6.
  • We search for massive and compact galaxies (superdense galaxies, hereafter SDGs) at z=0.03-0.11 in the Padova-Millennium Galaxy and Group Catalogue, a spectroscopically complete sample representative of the local Universe general field population. We find that compact galaxies with radii and mass densities comparable to high-z massive and passive galaxies represent 4.4% of all galaxies with stellar masses above 3 X 10^10 M_sun, yielding a number density of 4.3 X 10^-4 h^3 Mpc^-3. Most of them are S0s (70%) or ellipticals (23%), are red and have intermediate-to-old stellar populations, with a median luminosity-weighted age of 5.4 Gyr and a median mass-weighted age of 9.2 Gyr. Their velocity dispersions and dynamical masses are consistent with the small radii and high stellar mass estimates. Comparing with the WINGS sample of cluster galaxies at similar redshifts, the fraction of superdense galaxies is three times smaller in the field than in clusters, and cluster SDGs are on average 4 Gyr older than field SDGs. We confirm the existence of a universal trend of smaller radii for older luminosity-weighted ages at fixed galaxy mass. On top of the well known dependence of stellar age on galaxy mass, the luminosity-weighted age of galaxies depends on galaxy compactness at fixed mass, and, for a fixed mass and radius, on environment. This effect needs to be taken into account in order not to overestimate the evolution of galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. Our results and hierarchical simulations suggest that a significant fraction of the massive compact galaxies at high-z have evolved into compact galaxies in galaxy clusters today. When stellar age and environmental effects are taken into account, the average amount of size evolution of individual galaxies between high- and low-z is mild, a factor ~1.6. (abridged)
  • We present the galaxy stellar mass function (MF) and its evolution in clusters from z~0.8 to the current epoch, based on the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) (0.04<z<0.07), and the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) (0.4<z <0.8). We investigate the total MF and find it evolves noticeably with redshift. The shape at M*>10^11 M' does not evolve, but below M*~10^10.8 M' the MF at high redshift is flat, while in the Local Universe it flattens out at lower masses. The population of M* = 10^10.2 - 10^10.8 M' galaxies must have grown significantly between z=0.8 and z=0. We analyze the MF of different morphological types (ellipticals, S0s and late-types), and find that also each of them evolves with redshift. All types have proportionally more massive galaxies at high- than at low-z, and the strongest evolution occurs among S0 galaxies. Examining the morphology-mass relation (the way the proportion of galaxies of different morphological types changes with galaxy mass), we find it strongly depends on redshift. At both redshifts, ~40% of the stellar mass is in elliptical galaxies. Another ~43% of the mass is in S0 galaxies in local clusters, while it is in spirals in distant clusters. To explain the observed trends, we discuss the importance of those mechanisms that could shape the MF. We conclude that mass growth due to star formation plays a crucial role in driving the evolution. It has to be accompanied by infall of galaxies onto clusters, and the mass distribution of infalling galaxies might be different from that of cluster galaxies. However, comparing with high-z field samples, we do not find conclusive evidence for such an environmental mass segregation. Our results suggest that star formation and infall change directly the MF of late-type galaxies in clusters and, indirectly, that of early-type galaxies through subsequent morphological transformations.
  • We quantify the evolution of the spiral, S0 and elliptical fractions in galaxy clusters as a function of cluster velocity dispersion ($\sigma$) and X-ray luminosity ($L_X$) using a new database of 72 nearby clusters from the WIde-Field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) combined with literature data at $z=0.5-1.2$. Most WINGS clusters have $\sigma$ between 500 and 1100 $\rm km s^{-1}$, and $L_X$ between 0.2 and $5 \times 10^{44} \rm erg/s$. The S0 fraction in clusters is known to increase with time at the expense of the spiral population. We find that the spiral and S0 fractions have evolved more strongly in lower $\sigma$, less massive clusters, while we confirm that the proportion of ellipticals has remained unchanged. Our results demonstrate that morphological evolution since $z=1$ is not confined to massive clusters, but is actually more pronounced in low mass clusters, and therefore must originate either from secular (intrinsic) evolution and/or from environmental mechanisms that act preferentially in low-mass environments, or both in low- and high-mass systems. We also find that the evolution of the spiral fraction perfectly mirrors the evolution of the fraction of star-forming galaxies. Interestingly, at low-z the spiral fraction anticorrelates with $L_X$. Conversely, no correlation is observed with $\sigma$. Given that both $\sigma$ and $L_X$ are tracers of the cluster mass, these results pose a challenge for current scenarios of morphological evolution in clusters.
  • Two families of hot stellar systems, named {\it `ordinary'\/} and {\it 'bright'\/}, are identified in the ($\log R_e, \mu_e$) plane built with a luminosity--limited sample of ellipticals and bulges of S0s and spirals of the Virgo and Fornax clusters. This finding, based on {\it ad hoc\/} new observations, is confirmed by a much larger set of literature data for $\sim1500$ galaxies. The {\it `ordinary'\/} family is biparametric: $L_T\propto I_e\,R_e^2$; its members are fainter that $M_B\simeq-19.3$ and smaller than $\re\simeq3$ kpc (whatever $M_B$ is). The {\it 'bright'\/} family is uniparametric ($\mu_e$ depends on $R_e$ alone) and hosts brightest cluster members and QSO parent galaxies. We show that the segregation in the ($\log R_e, \mu_e$) plane has an important counterpart in the behavior of various physical parameters, which is markedly different for galaxies smaller ({\it `ordinary'\/} family) and larger ({\it 'bright'\/} family) than $R_e=3$ kpc.