• Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DMRI) is the only non-invasive imaging technique which is able to detect the principal directions of water diffusion as well as neurites density in the human brain. Exploiting the ability of Spherical Harmonics (SH) to model spherical functions, we propose a new reconstruction model for DMRI data which is able to estimate both the fiber Orientation Distribution Function (fODF) and the relative volume fractions of the neurites in each voxel, which is robust to multiple fiber crossings. We consider a Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density Imaging (NODDI) inspired single fiber diffusion signal to be derived from three compartments: intracellular, extracellular, and cerebrospinal fluid. The model, called NODDI-SH, is derived by convolving the single fiber response with the fODF in each voxel. NODDI-SH embeds the calculation of the fODF and the neurite density in a unified mathematical model providing efficient, robust and accurate results. Results were validated on simulated data and tested on \textit{in-vivo} data of human brain, and compared to and Constrained Spherical Deconvolution (CSD) for benchmarking. Results revealed competitive performance in all respects and inherent adaptivity to local microstructure, while sensibly reducing the computational cost. We also investigated NODDI-SH performance when only a limited number of samples are available for the fitting, demonstrating that 60 samples are enough to obtain reliable results. The fast computational time and the low number of signal samples required, make NODDI-SH feasible for clinical application.
  • In studying structural inter-connections in the human brain, it is common to first estimate fiber bundles connecting different regions of the brain relying on diffusion MRI. These fiber bundles act as highways for neural activity and communication, snaking through the brain and connecting different regions. Current statistical methods for analyzing these fibers reduce the rich information into an adjacency matrix, with the elements containing a count of the number of fibers or a mean diffusion feature (such as fractional anisotropy) along the fibers. The goal of this article is to avoid discarding the rich functional data on the shape, size and orientation of fibers, developing flexible models for characterizing the population distribution of fibers between brain regions of interest within and across different individuals. We start by decomposing each fiber in each individual's brain into a corresponding rotation matrix, shape and translation from a global reference curve. These components can be viewed as data lying on a product space composed of different Euclidean spaces and manifolds. To non-parametrically model the distribution within and across individuals, we rely on a hierarchical mixture of product kernels specific to the component spaces. Taking a Bayesian approach to inference, we develop an efficient method for posterior sampling. The approach automatically produces clusters of fibers within and across individuals, and yields interesting new insights into variation in fiber curves, while providing a useful starting point for more elaborate models relating fibers to covariates and neuropsychiatric traits.
  • Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging datasets suffer from low Signal-to-Noise Ratio, especially at high b-values. Acquiring data at high b-values contains relevant information and is now of great interest for microstructural and connectomics studies. High noise levels bias the measurements due to the non-Gaussian nature of the noise, which in turn can lead to a false and biased estimation of the diffusion parameters. Additionally, the usage of in-plane acceleration techniques during the acquisition leads to a spatially varying noise distribution, which depends on the parallel acceleration method implemented on the scanner. This paper proposes a novel diffusion MRI denoising technique that can be used on all existing data, without adding to the scanning time. We first apply a statistical framework to convert the noise to Gaussian distributed noise, effectively removing the bias. We then introduce a spatially and angular adaptive denoising technique, the Non Local Spatial and Angular Matching (NLSAM) algorithm. Each volume is first decomposed in small 4D overlapping patches to capture the structure of the diffusion data and a dictionary of atoms is learned on those patches. A local sparse decomposition is then found by bounding the reconstruction error with the local noise variance. We compare against three other state-of-the-art denoising methods and show quantitative local and connectivity results on a synthetic phantom and on an in-vivo high resolution dataset. Overall, our method restores perceptual information, removes the noise bias in common diffusion metrics, restores the extracted peaks coherence and improves reproducibility of tractography. Our work paves the way for higher spatial resolution acquisition of diffusion MRI datasets, which could in turn reveal new anatomical details that are not discernible at the spatial resolution currently used by the diffusion MRI community.
  • The understanding of neurodegenerative diseases undoubtedly passes through the study of human brain white matter fiber tracts. To date, diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is the unique technique to obtain information about the neural architecture of the human brain, thus permitting the study of white matter connections and their integrity. However, a remaining challenge of the dMRI community is to better characterize complex fiber crossing configurations, where diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is limited but high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) now brings solutions. This paper investigates the development of both identification and classification process of the local water diffusion phenomenon based on HARDI data to automatically detect imaging voxels where there are single and crossing fiber bundle populations. The technique is based on knowledge extraction processes and is validated on a dMRI phantom dataset with ground truth.