• The dynamo effect is a class of macroscopic phenomena responsible for generation and maintaining magnetic fields in astrophysical bodies. It hinges on hydrodynamic three-dimensional motion of conducting gases and plasmas that achieve high hydrodynamic and/or magnetic Reynolds numbers due to large length scales involved. The existing laboratory experiments modeling dynamos are challenging and involve large apparatuses containing conducting fluids subject to fast helical flows. Here we propose that electronic solid-state materials -- in particular, hydrodynamic metals -- may serve as an alternative platform to observe some aspects of the dynamo effect. Motivated by recent experimental developments, this paper focuses on hydrodynamic Weyl semimetals, where the dominant scattering mechanism is due to interactions. We derive Navier-Stokes equations along with equations of magneto-hydrodynamics that describe transport of Weyl electron-hole plasma appropriate in this regime. We estimate the hydrodynamic and magnetic Reynolds numbers for this system. The latter is a key figure of merit of the dynamo mechanism. We show that it can be relatively large to enable observation of the dynamo-induced magnetic field bootstrap in experiment. Finally, we generalize the simplest dynamo instability model -- Ponomarenko dynamo -- to the case of a hydrodynamic Weyl semimetal and show that the chiral anomaly term reduces the threshold magnetic Reynolds number for the dynamo instability.
  • The infinite Projected Entangled-Pair State (iPEPS) algorithm is one of the most efficient techniques for studying the ground-state properties of two-dimensional quantum lattice Hamiltonians in the thermodynamic limit. Here, we show how the algorithm can be adapted to explore nearest-neighbor local Hamiltonians on the ruby and triangle-honeycomb lattices, using the Corner Transfer Matrix (CTM) renormalization group for 2D tensor network contraction. Additionally, we show how the CTM method can be used to calculate the ground state fidelity per lattice site and the boundary density operator and entanglement entropy (EE) on an infinite cylinder. As a benchmark, we apply the iPEPS method to the ruby model with anisotropic interactions and explore the ground-state properties of the system. We further extract the phase diagram of the model in different regimes of the couplings by measuring two-point correlators, ground state fidelity and EE on an infinite cylinder. Our phase diagram is in agreement with previous studies of the model by exact diagonalization.
  • In several members of the pnictide materials, spin density wave order coexists with superconductivity over a range of dopings and temperature. In this paper we show that odd-frequency superconductivity emerges on the edges of pnictides in such a coexistence phase. In particular, the breaking of spin-rotation symmetry by SDW and translation symmetry by the edge can lead to the development of odd-frequency spin-triplet Cooper pairing on edges of superconducting pnictide samples. In this case, the odd-frequency pairing has even parity components, which are immune to disorder. Our results show that pnictides are a natural platform to realize odd frequency superconductivity, which is a new quantum phase and has been mainly searched for in heterostructures of magnetic and superconducting materials. The emergence of odd-frequency pairing on the edges and in the defects can be potentially detected in magnetic response measurements.
  • The unusual surface states of topological semimetals have attracted a lot of attention. Recently, we showed [PNAS 113, 8648 (2016)] that for a Dirac semimetal (DSM) arising from band-inversion, such as Na$_3$Bi and Cd$_3$As$_2$, the expected double Fermi arcs on the surface are not topologically protected. Quite generally, the arcs deform into states similar to those on the surface of a strong topological insulator. Here we address two questions related to deformation and stability of surface states in DSMs. First, we discuss why certain perturbations, no matter how large, are unable to destroy the double Fermi arcs. We show that this is related to certain extra (particle-hole) symmetry, which is non-generic in materials. Second, we discuss situations in which the surface states are completely destroyed without breaking any symmetry or impacting the bulk Dirac nodes. We are not aware of any experimental or density functional theory (DFT) candidates for a material which is a bulk DSM without any surface states, but our results clearly show that this is possible.
  • Superconductivity that spontaneously breaks time-reversal symmetry (TRS) has been found, so far, only in a handful of 3D crystals with bulk inversion symmetry. Here we report an observation of spontaneous TRS breaking in a 2D superconducting system without inversion symmetry: the epitaxial bilayer films of bismuth and nickel. The evidence comes from the onset of the polar Kerr effect at the superconducting transition in the absence of an external magnetic field, detected by the ultrasensitive loop-less fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer. Because of strong spin-orbit interaction and lack of inversion symmetry in a Bi/Ni bilayer, superconducting pairing cannot be classified as singlet or triplet. We propose a theoretical model where magnetic fluctuations in Ni induce superconducting pairing of the dxy = +- idx^2y^2 orbital symmetry between the electrons in Bi. In this model the order parameter spontaneously breaks the TRS and has a non-zero phase winding number around the Fermi surface, thus making it a rare example of a 2D topological superconductor.
  • The ruby lattice is a four-valent lattice interpolating between honeycomb and triangular lattices. In this work we investigate the topological spin-liquid phases of a spin Hamiltonian with Kitaev interactions on the ruby lattice using exact diagonalization and perturbative methods. The latter interactions combined with the structure of the lattice yield a model with $\mathbb{Z}_2 \times \mathbb{Z}_2$ gauge symmetry. We mapped out the phase digram of the model and found gapped and gapless spin-liquid phases. While the low energy sector of the gapped phase corresponds to the well-known topological color code model on a honeycomb lattice, the low-energy sector of the gapless phases is described by an effective spin model with three-body interactions on a triangular lattice. A gap is opened in the spectrum in a small magnetic field. We argue that the latter phases could be possibly described by exotic excitations, whose their spectrum is richer than the Ising phase of the Kitaev model.
  • The surface of a 3D topological insulator is described by a helical electron state with the electron's spin and momentum locked together. We show that in the presence of ferromagnetic fluctuations the surface of a topological insulator is unstable towards a superconducting state with unusual pairing, dubbed Amperean pairing. The key idea is that the dynamical fluctuations of a ferromagnetic layer deposited on the surface of a topological insulator couple to the electrons as gauge fields. The transverse components of the magnetic gauge fields are unscreened and can mediate an effective interaction between electrons. There is an attractive interaction between electrons with momenta in the same direction which makes the pairing to be of Amperean type. We show that this attractive interaction leads to a $p$-wave pairing instability of the Fermi surface in the Cooper channel.
  • Motivated by recent experiments probing anomalous surface states of Dirac semimetals (DSMs) Na$_3$Bi and Cd$_3$As$_2$, we raise the question posed in the title. We find that, in marked contrast to Weyl semimetals, the gapless surface states of DSMs are not topologically protected in general, except on time-reversal-invariant planes of surface Brillouin zone. We first demonstrate this in a minimal $4$-band model with a pair of Dirac nodes at ${\bf k}=(0,0,\pm Q)$, where gapless states on the side surfaces are protected only near $k_z=0$. We then validate our conclusions about the absence of a topological invariant protecting double Fermi arcs in DSMs using a K-theory analysis for space groups of Na$_3$Bi and Cd$_3$As$_2$. Generically, the arcs deform into a Fermi pocket, similar to {{the surface states of a topological insulator (TI), and this can merge into the}} projection of bulk Dirac Fermi surfaces as the chemical potential is varied. We make sharp predictions for the doping-dependence of the surface states of a DSM that can be tested by ARPES and quantum oscillation experiments.
  • We consider the electromagnetic response of a topological Weyl semimetal (TWS) with a pair of Weyl nodes in the bulk and corresponding Fermi arcs in the surface Brillouin zone. We compute the frequency-dependent complex conductivities $\sigma_{\alpha\beta}(\omega)$ and also take into account the modification of Maxwell equations by the topological $\theta$-term to obtain the Kerr and Faraday rotations in a variety of geometries. For TWS films thinner than the wavelength, the Kerr and Faraday rotations, determined by the separation between Weyl nodes, are significantly larger than in topological insulators. In thicker films, the Kerr and Faraday angles can be enhanced by choice of film thickness and substrate refractive index. We show that, for radiation incident on a surface with Fermi arcs, there is no Kerr or Faraday rotation but the electric field develops a longitudinal component inside the TWS, and there is magnetic linear dichroism. Our results have implications for probing the TWS phase in various experimental systems.
  • We investigate the low-energy spectral properties and robustness of the topological phase of color code, which is a quantum spin model for the aim of fault-tolerant quantum computation, in the presence of a uniform magnetic field or Ising interactions, using high-order series expansion and exact diagonalization. In a uniform magnetic field, we find 1st-order phase transitions in all field directions. In contrast, our results for the Ising interactions unveil that for strong enough Ising couplings, the Z2 x Z2 topological phase of color code breaks down to symmetry broken phases by 1st- or 2nd-order phase transitions.
  • The effects of electronic correlations and orbital degeneracy on thermoelectric properties are studied within the context of multi-orbital Hubbard models on different lattices. We use dynamical mean field theory with iterative perturbation theory as a solver to calculate the self-energy of the models in wide range of interaction strengths. The Seebeck coefficient, which measures the voltage drop in response to a temperature gradient across the system, shows a non-monotonic behavior with temperatures in the presence of strong correlations. This anomalous behavior is associated with a crossover from a Fermi liquid metal at low temperatures to a bad metal with incoherent excitations at high temperatures. We find that for interactions comparable to the bandwidth the Seebeck coefficient acquires large values at low temperatures. Moreover, for strongly correlated cases, where the interaction is larger than the band width, the figure of merit is enhanced over a wide range of temperatures because of decreasing electronic contributions to the thermal conductivity. We also find that multi-orbital systems will typically yield larger thermopower compared to single orbital models.
  • Mott physics is characterized by an interaction-driven metal-to-insulator transition in a partially filled band. In the resulting insulating state, antiferromagnetic orders of the local moments typically develop, but in rare situations no long-range magnetic order appears, even at zero temperature, rendering the system a quantum spin liquid. A fundamental and technologically critical question is whether one can tune the underlying energetic landscape to control both metal-to-insulator and N\'eel transitions, and even stabilize latent metastable phases, ideally on a platform suitable for applications. Here we demonstrate how to achieve this in ultrathin films of NdNiO3 with various degrees of lattice mismatch, and report on the quantum critical behaviours not reported in the bulk by transport measurements and resonant X-ray spectroscopy/scattering. In particular, on the decay of the antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state into a non-Fermi liquid, we find evidence of a quantum metal-to-insulator transition that spans a non-magnetic insulating phase.
  • Topological crystalline insulators (TCI) possess electronic states protected by crystal symmetries, rather than time-reversal symmetry. We show that the transition metal oxides with heavy transition metals are able to support nontrivial band topology resulting from mirror symmetry of the lattice. As an example, we consider pyrochlore oxides of the form A$_2$M$_2$O$_7$. As a function of spin-orbit coupling strength, we find two $Z_2$ topological insulator phases can be distinguished from each other by their mirror Chern numbers, each of which indicates a different TCI. We also derive an effective $\bf{k\cdot p}$ Hamiltonian, similar to the model introduced for $\mathrm{Pb_{1-x}Sn_{x}Te}$, and discuss the effect of an on-site Hubbard interaction on the topological crystalline insulator phase using slave-rotor mean-field theory, which predicts new classes of topological quantum spin liquids.
  • The robustness of the topological color code, which is a class of error correcting quantum codes, is investigated under the influence of an uniform magnetic field on the honeycomb lattice. Our study relies on two high-order series expansions using perturbative continuous unitary transformations in the limit of low and high fields, exact diagonalization and a classical approximation. We show that the topological color code in a single parallel field is isospectral to the Baxter-Wu model in a transverse field on the triangular lattice. It is found that the topological phase is stable up to a critical field beyond which it breaks down to the polarized phase by a first-order phase transition. The results also suggest that the topological color code is more robust than the toric code, in the parallel magnetic field.
  • The expected phenomenology of non-interacting topological band insulators (TBI) is now largely theoretically understood. However, the fate of TBIs in the presence of interactions remains an active area of research with novel, interaction-driven topological states possible, as well as new exotic magnetic states. In this work we study the magnetic phases of an exchange Hamiltonian arising in the strong interaction limit of a Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice whose non-interacting limit is a two-dimensional TBI recently proposed for the layered heavy transition metal oxide compound, (Li,Na)$_2$IrO$_3$. By a combination of analytical methods and exact diagonalization studies on finite size clusters, we map out the magnetic phase diagram of the model. We find that strong spin-orbit coupling can lead to a phase transition from an antiferromagnetic Ne\'el state to a spiral or stripy ordered state. We also discuss the conditions under which a quantum spin liquid may appear in our model, and we compare our results with the different but related Kitaev-Heisenberg-$J_2$-$J_3$ model which has recently been studied in a similar context.
  • The anyonic excitations of topological two-body color code model are used to implement a set of gates. Because of two-body interactions, the model can be simulated in optical lattices. The excitations have nontrivial mutual statistics, and are coupled to nontrivial gauge fields. The underlying lattice structure provides various opportunities for encoding the states of a logical qubit in anyonic states. The interactions make the transition between different anyonic states, so being logical operation in the computational bases of the encoded qubit. Two-qubit gates can be performed in a topological way using the braiding of anyons around each other.
  • Recent progress in understanding the topological properties of condensed matter has led to the discovery of time-reversal invariant topological insulators. Because of limitations imposed by nature, topologically non-trivial electronic order seems to be uncommon except in small-band-gap semiconductors with strong spin-orbit interactions. In this Article we show that artificial electromagnetic structures, known as metamaterials, provide an attractive platform for designing photonic analogues of topological insulators. We demonstrate that a judicious choice of the metamaterial parameters can create photonic phases that support a pair of helical edge states, and that these edge states enable one-way photonic transport that is robust against disorder.
  • We study the Kane-Mele-Hubbard model both at half-filling and away from half-filling using a slave-boson mean-field approach at zero temperature. We obtain a phase diagram at half-filling and discuss its connection to recent results from quantum Monte Carlo, slave-rotor, and $Z_2$ mean-field studies. In particular, we find a small window in parameter space where a spin liquid phase with gapped spin and charge excitations reside. Upon doping, we show the spin liquid state becomes a superconducting state by explicitly calculating the singlet pairing order parameters. Interestingly, we find an "optimal" doping for such superconductivity. Our work reveals some of the phenomenology associated with doping an interacting system with strong spin-orbit coupling.
  • In this paper we review some connections recently discovered between topological insulators and certain classes of quantum spin liquids, focusing on two and three spatial dimensions. In two dimensions we show the integer quantum Hall effect plays a key role in relating topological insulators and chiral spin liquids described by fermionic excitations, and we describe a procedure for "generating" a certain class of topological states. In three dimensions we discuss interesting relationships between certain quantum spin liquids and interacting "exotic" variants of topological insulators. We focus attention on better understanding interactions in topological insulators, and the phases nearby in parameter space that might result from moderate to strong interactions in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling. We stress that oxides with heavy transition metal ions, which often host a competition between electron interactions and spin-orbit coupling, are an excellent place to search for unusual topological phenomena and other unconventional phases.
  • We study a tight-binding model on the two-dimensional ruby lattice. This lattice supports several types of first and second neighbor spin-dependent hopping parameters in an $s$-band model that preserves time-reversal symmetry. We discuss the phase diagram of this model for various values of the hopping parameters and filling fractions, and note an interesting competition between spin-orbit terms that individually would drive the system to a $Z_2$ topological insulating phase. We also discuss a closely related spin-polarized model with only first and second neighbor hoppings and show that extremely flat bands with finite Chern numbers result, with a ratio of the band gap to the band width approximately 70. Such flat bands are an ideal platform to realize a fractional quantum Hall effect at appropriate filling fractions. The ruby lattice can be possibly engineered in optical lattices, and may open the door to studies of transitions between quantum spin liquids, topological insulators, and integer and fractional quantum Hall states.
  • In this work we investigate the phase diagram of heavy (4d and 5d) transition metal oxides on the pyrochlore lattice, such as those of the form $\mathrm{A_2M_2O_7}$, where A is a rare earth element and M is a transition metal element. We focus on the competition between Coulomb interaction, spin-orbit coupling, and lattice distortion when these energy scales are comparable. Strong spin-orbit coupling entangles the spin and the $t_{2g}$ $d$-orbitals giving rise to doublet $j=1/2$ and quadruplet $j=3/2$ states. In contrast to previous works which focused on the doublet manifold, we also discuss the quadruplet manifold which is relevant for several pyrochlore oxides. The Coulomb interaction is taken into account by use of the slave-rotor mean field theory and different classes of lattice distortions which further split the levels of the quadruplet $j=3/2$ manifold are studied. Various topological phases are predicted, including exotic strong and weak topological Mott insulating phases. We discuss the general structure of the phase diagram for several values of $d$-shell filling and various symmetry classes of lattice distortions. Our results are relevant to the search for exotic topological insulators and quantum spin liquids in strongly correlated materials with strong spin-orbit coupling.
  • We theoretically investigate a tight binding model of fermions hopping on the square-octagon lattice which consists of a square lattice with plaquette corners themselves decorated by squares. Upon the inclusion of second neighbor spin-orbit coupling or non-Abelian gauge fields, time-reversal symmetric topological Z_2 band insulators are realized. Additional insulating and gapless phases are also realized via the non-Abelian gauge fields. Some of the phase transitions involve topological changes to the Fermi surface. The stability of the topological phases to various symmetry breaking terms is investigated via the entanglement spectrum. Our results enlarge the number of known exactly solvable models of Z_2 band insulators, and are potentially relevant to the realization and identification of topological phases in both the solid state and cold atomic gases.
  • In this work the topological order at finite temperature in two-dimensional color code is studied. The topological entropy is used to measure the behavior of the topological order. Topological order in color code arises from the colored string-net structures. By imposing the hard constrained limit the exact solution of the entanglement entropy becomes possible. For finite size systems, by raising the temperature, one type of string-net structure is thermalized and the associative topological entropy vanishes. In the thermodynamic limit the underlying topological order is fragile even at very low temperatures. Taking first the thermodynamic limit and then the zero-temperature limit and vice versa does not commute, and their difference is related only to the topology of regions. The contribution of the colors and symmetry of the model in the topological entropy is also discussed. It is shown how the gauge symmetry of the color code underlies the topological entropy.
  • The entanglement properties of a class of topological stabilizer states, the so called \emph{topological color codes} defined on a two-dimensional lattice or \emph{2-colex}, are calculated. The topological entropy is used to measure the entanglement of different bipartitions of the 2-colex. The dependency of the ground state degeneracy on the genus of the surface shows that the color code can support a topological order, and the contribution of the color in its structure makes it interesting to compare with the Kitaev's toric code. While a qubit is maximally entangled with rest of the system, two qubits are no longer entangled showing that the color code is genuinely multipartite entangled. For a convex region, it is found that entanglement entropy depends only on the degrees of freedom living on the boundary of two subsystems. The boundary scaling of entropy is supplemented with a topological subleading term which for a color code defined on a compact surface is twice than the toric code. From the entanglement entropy we construct a set of bipartitions in which the diverging term arising from the boundary term is washed out, and the remaining non-vanishing term will have a topological nature. Besides the color code on the compact surface, we also analyze the entanglement properties of a version of color code with border, i.e \emph{triangular color code}.