• Electrolyte gating using ionic liquid electrolytes has recently generated considerable interest as a method to achieve large carrier density modulations in a variety of materials. In noble metal thin films, electrolyte gating results in large changes in sheet resistance. The widely accepted mechanism for these changes is the formation of an electric double layer with a charged layer of ions in the liquid and accumulation or depletion of carriers in the thin film. We report here a different mechanism. In particular, we show using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) that the previously reported large conductance modulation in gold films is due to reversible oxidation and reduction of the surface rather than the charging of an electric double layer. We show that the double layer capacitance accounts for less than 10\% of the observed change in transport properties. These results represent a significant step towards understanding the mechanisms involved in electrolyte gating.
  • Rational design of artificial lattices yields effects unavailable in simple solids, and vertical superlattices of multilayer semiconductors are already used in optical sensors and emitters. Manufacturing lateral superlattices remains a much bigger challenge, with new opportunities offered by the use of moire patterns in van der Waals heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal crystals such as boron nitride (h-BN). Experiments to date have elucidated the novel electronic structure of highly aligned graphene/h-BN heterostructures, where miniband edges and saddle points in the electronic dispersion can be reached by electrostatic gating. Here we investigate the dynamics of electrons in moire minibands by transverse electron focusing, a measurement of ballistic transport between adjacent local contacts in a magnetic field. At low temperatures, we observe caustics of skipping orbits extending over hundreds of superlattice periods, reversals of the cyclotron revolution for successive minibands, and breakdown of cyclotron motion near van Hove singularities. At high temperatures, we study the suppression of electron focusing by inelastic scattering.
  • The fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect is a canonical example of electron-electron interactions producing new ground states in many-body systems. Most FQH studies have focused on the lowest Landau level (LL), whose fractional states are successfully explained by the composite fermion (CF) model, in which an even number of magnetic flux quanta are attached to an electron and where states form the sequence of filling factors $\nu = p/(2mp \pm 1)$, with $m$ and $p$ positive integers. In the widely-studied GaAs-based system, the CF picture is thought to become unstable for the $N \geq 2$ LL, where larger residual interactions between CFs are predicted and competing many-body phases have been observed. Here we report transport measurements of FQH states in the $N=2$ LL (filling factors $4 < \nu < 8$) in bilayer graphene, a system with spin and valley degrees of freedom in all LLs, and an additional orbital degeneracy in the 8-fold degenerate $N=0$/$N=1$ LLs. In contrast with recent observations of particle-hole asymmetry in the $N=0$/$N=1$ LLs of bilayer graphene, the FQH states we observe in the $N=2$ LL are consistent with the CF model: within a LL, they form a complete sequence of particle-hole symmetric states whose relative strength is dependent on their denominators. The FQH states in the $N=2$ LL display energy gaps of a few Kelvin, comparable to and in some cases larger than those of fractional states in the $N=0$/$N=1$ LLs. The FQH states we observe form, to the best of our knowledge, the highest set of particle-hole symmetric pairs seen in any material system.
  • Graphene monolayers are known to display domains of anisotropic friction with twofold symmetry and anisotropy exceeding 200 percent. This anisotropy has been thought to originate from periodic nanoscale ripples in the graphene sheet, which enhance puckering around a sliding asperity to a degree determined by the sliding direction. Here we demonstrate that these frictional domains derive not from structural features in the graphene, but from self-assembly of atmospheric adsorbates into a highly regular superlattice of stripes with period 4 to 6 nm. The stripes and resulting frictional domains appear on monolayer and multilayer graphene on a variety of substrates, as well as on exfoliated flakes of hexagonal boron nitride. We show that the stripe-superlattices can be reproducibly and reversibly manipulated with submicron precision using a scanning probe microscope, allowing us to create arbitrary arrangements of frictional domains within a single flake. Our results suggest a revised understanding of the anisotropic friction observed in graphene and bulk graphite in terms of atmospheric adsorbates.
  • Electrolyte gating is a powerful technique for accumulating large carrier densities in surface two-dimensional electron systems (2DES). Yet this approach suffers from significant sources of disorder: electrochemical reactions can damage or alter the surface of interest, and the ions of the electrolyte and various dissolved contaminants sit Angstroms from the 2DES. Accordingly, electrolyte gating is well-suited to studies of superconductivity and other phenomena robust to disorder, but of limited use when reactions or disorder must be avoided. Here we demonstrate that these limitations can be overcome by protecting the sample with a chemically inert, atomically smooth sheet of hexagonal boron nitride (BN). We illustrate our technique with electrolyte-gated strontium titanate, whose mobility improves more than tenfold when protected with BN. We find this improvement even for our thinnest BN, of measured thickness 6 A, with which we can accumulate electron densities nearing 10^14 cm^-2. Our technique is portable to other materials, and should enable future studies where high carrier density modulation is required but electrochemical reactions and surface disorder must be minimized.
  • We describe the synthesis, materials characterization and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of amorphous and crystalline silicon nanoparticles for use as hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents. The particles were synthesized by means of a metathesis reaction between sodium silicide (Na4Si4) and silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) and were surface functionalized with a variety of passivating ligands. The synthesis scheme results in particles of diameter ~10 nm with long size-adjusted 29Si spin lattice relaxation (T1) times (> 600 s), which are retained after hyperpolarization by low temperature DNP.
  • We report low-temperature, high-field magnetotransport measurements of SrTiO3 gated by an ionic gel electrolyte. A saturating resistance upturn and negative magnetoresistance that signal the emergence of the Kondo effect appear for higher applied gate voltages. This observation, enabled by the wide tunability of the ionic gel-applied electric field, promotes the interpretation of the electric field-effect induced 2D electron system in SrTiO3 as an admixture of magnetic Ti3+ ions, i.e. localized and unpaired electrons, and delocalized electrons that partially fill the Ti 3d conduction band.