• The massive scale of future wireless networks will create computational bottlenecks in performance optimization. In this paper, we study the problem of connecting mobile traffic to Cloud RAN (C-RAN) stations. To balance station load, we steer the traffic by designing device association rules. The baseline association rule connects each device to the station with the strongest signal, which does not account for interference or traffic hot spots, and leads to load imbalances and performance deterioration. Instead, we can formulate an optimization problem to decide centrally the best association rule at each time instance. However, in practice this optimization has such high dimensions, that even linear programming solvers fail to solve. To address the challenge of massive connectivity, we propose an approach based on the theory of optimal transport, which studies the economical transfer of probability between two distributions. Our proposed methodology can further inspire scalable algorithms for massive optimization problems in wireless networks.
  • Massive multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) transmission is a promising technology to improve the capacity and reliability of wireless systems. However, the number of antennas that can be equipped at a base station (BS) is limited by the BS form factor, posing a challenge to the deployment of massive linear arrays. To cope with this limitation, this work discusses Full Dimension MIMO (FD-MIMO), which is currently an active area of research and standardization in the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) for evolution towards fifth generation (5G) cellular systems. FD-MIMO utilizes an active antenna system (AAS) with a 2D planar array structure, which provides the ability of adaptive electronic beamforming in the 3D space. This paper presents the design of the AAS and the ongoing efforts in the 3GPP to develop the corresponding 3D channel model. Compact structure of large-scale antenna arrays drastically increases the spatial correlation in FD-MIMO systems. In order to account for its effects, the generalized spatial correlation functions for channels constituted by individual antenna elements and overall antenna ports in the AAS are derived. Exploiting the quasi-static channel covariance matrices of the users, the problem of determining the optimal downtilt weight vector for antenna ports, which maximizes the minimum signal-to-interference ratio of a multi-user multiple-input-single-output system, is formulated as a fractional optimization problem. A quasi-optimal solution is obtained through the application of semi-definite relaxation and Dinkelbach's method. Finally, the user-group specific elevation beamforming scenario is devised, which offers significant performance gains as confirmed through simulations. These results have direct application in the analysis of 5G FD-MIMO systems.
  • In this paper, a novel machine learning (ML) framework is proposed for enabling a predictive, efficient deployment of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), acting as aerial base stations (BSs), to provide on-demand wireless service to cellular users. In order to have a comprehensive analysis of cellular traffic, an ML framework based on a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) and a weighted expectation maximization (WEM) algorithm is introduced to predict the potential network congestion. Then, the optimal deployment of UAVs is studied to minimize the transmit power needed to satisfy the communication demand of users in the downlink, while also minimizing the power needed for UAV mobility, based on the predicted cellular traffic. To this end, first, the optimal partition of service areas of each UAV is derived, based on a fairness principle. Next, the optimal location of each UAV that minimizes the total power consumption is derived. Simulation results show that the proposed ML approach can reduce the required downlink transmit power and improve the power efficiency by over 20%, compared with an optimal deployment of UAVs with no ML prediction.
  • We investigate the problem of multi-hop scheduling in self-backhauled millimeter wave (mmWave) networks. Owing to the high path loss and blockage of mmWave links, multi-hop paths between the macro base station and the intended users via full-duplex small cells need to be carefully selected. This paper addresses the fundamental question: how to select the best paths and how to allocate rates over these paths subject to latency constraints. To answer this question, we propose a new system design, which factors in mmWave-specific channel variations and network dynamics. The problem is cast as a network utility maximization subject to a bounded delay constraint and network stability. The studied problem is decoupled into: (i) a path selection and (ii) rate allocation, whereby learning the best paths is done by means of a reinforcement learning algorithm, and the rate allocation is solved by applying the successive convex approximation method. Via numerical results, our approach ensures reliable communication with a guaranteed probability of 99.9999%, and reduces latency by 50.64% and 92.9% as compared to baselines.
  • In this work, a new energy-efficiency performance metric is proposed for MIMO (multiple input multiple output) point-to-point systems. In contrast with related works on energy-efficiency, this metric translates the effects of using finite blocks for transmitting, using channel estimates at the transmitter and receiver, and considering the total power consumed by the transmitter instead of the radiated power only. The main objective pursued is to choose the best pre-coding matrix used at the transmitter in the following two scenarios~: 1) the one where imperfect channel state information (CSI) is available at the transmitter and receiver~; 2) the one where no CSI is available at the transmitter. In both scenarios, the problem of optimally tuning the total used power is shown to be non-trivial. In scenario 2), the optimal fraction of training time can be characterized by a simple equation. These results and others provided in the paper, along with the provided numerical analysis, show that the present work can therefore be used as a good basis for studying power control and resource allocation in energy-efficient multiuser networks.
  • Human-centric applications such as virtual reality and immersive gaming will be central to the future wireless networks. Common features of such services include: a) their dependence on the human user's behavior and state, and b) their need for more network resources compared to conventional cellular applications. To successfully deploy such applications over wireless and cellular systems, the network must be made cognizant of not only the quality-of-service (QoS) needs of the applications, but also of the perceptions of the human users on this QoS. In this paper, by explicitly modeling the limitations of the human brain, a concrete measure for the delay perception of human users in a wireless network is introduced. Then, a novel learning method, called probability distribution identification, is proposed to find a probabilistic model for this delay perception based on the brain features of a human user. The proposed learning method uses both supervised and unsupervised learning techniques to build a Gaussian mixture model of the human brain features. Given a model for the delay perception of the human brain, a novel brain-aware resource management algorithm based on Lyapunov optimization is proposed for allocating radio resources to human users while minimizing the transmit power and taking into account the reliability of both machine type devices and human users. The proposed algorithm is shown to have a low complexity. Moreover, a closed-form relationship between the reliability measure and wireless physical layer metrics of the network is derived. Simulation results using real data from actual human users show that a brain-aware approach can yield savings of up to 78% in power compared to the system
  • This paper investigates a cellular edge caching problem under a very large number of small base stations (SBSs) and users. In this ultra-dense edge caching network (UDCN), conventional caching algorithms are inapplicable as their complexity increases with the number of small base stations (SBSs). Furthermore, the performance of UDCN is highly sensitive to the dynamics of user demand and inter-SBS interference. To overcome such difficulties, we propose a distributed caching algorithm under a stochastic geometric network model, as well as a spatio-temporal user demand model that characterizes the content popularity dynamics. By exploiting mean-field game (MFG) theory, the complexity of the proposed UDCN caching algorithm becomes independent of the number of SBSs. Numerical evaluations validate that the proposed caching algorithm reduces not only the long run average cost of the network but also the redundant cached data respectively by 24% and 42%, compared to a baseline caching algorithm. The simulation results also show that the proposed caching algorithm is robust to imperfect popularity information, while ensuring a low computational complexity.
  • The use of flying platforms such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), popularly known as drones, is rapidly growing in a wide range of wireless networking applications. In particular, with their inherent attributes such as mobility, flexibility, and adaptive altitude, UAVs admit several key potential applications in wireless systems. On the one hand, UAVs can be used as aerial base stations to enhance coverage, capacity, reliability, and energy efficiency of wireless networks. For instance, UAVs can be deployed to complement existing cellular systems by providing additional capacity to hotspot areas as well as to provide network coverage in emergency and public safety situations. On the other hand, UAVs can operate as flying mobile terminals within the cellular networks. In this paper, a comprehensive tutorial on the potential benefits and applications of UAVs in wireless communications is presented. Moreover, the important challenges and the fundamental tradeoffs in UAV-enabled wireless networks are thoroughly investigated. In particular, the key UAV challenges such as three-dimensional deployment, performance analysis, air-to-ground channel modeling, and energy efficiency are explored along with representative results. Then, fundamental open problems and potential research directions pertaining to wireless communications and networking with UAVs are introduced. To cope with the open research problems, various analytical frameworks and mathematical tools such as optimization theory, machine learning, stochastic geometry, transport theory, and game theory are described. The use of such tools for addressing unique UAV problems is also presented. In a nutshell, this tutorial provides key guidelines on how to analyze, optimize, and design UAV-based wireless communication systems.
  • In this letter, we investigate the problem of providing gigabit wireless access with reliable communication in 5G millimeter-Wave (mmWave) massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) networks. In contrast to the classical network design based on average metrics, we propose a distributed risk-sensitive reinforcement learning-based framework to jointly optimize the beamwidth and transmit power, while taking into account the sensitivity of mmWave links due to blockage. Numerical results show that our proposed algorithm achieves more than 9 Gbps of user throughput with a guaranteed probability of 90%, whereas the baselines guarantee less than 7.5 Gbps. More importantly, there exists a rate-reliability-network density tradeoff, in which as the user density increases from 16 to 96 per km2, the fraction of users that achieve 4 Gbps are reduced by 11.61% and 39.11% in the proposed and the baseline models, respectively.
  • Emerging wireless services such as augmented reality require next-generation wireless networks to support ultra-reliable and low-latency communication (URLLC), while also guaranteeing high data rates. Existing wireless networks that solely rely on the scarce sub-6 GHz, microwave ($\mu$W) frequency bands will be unable to meet the low-latency, high capacity requirements of future wireless services. Meanwhile, operating at high-frequency millimeter wave (mmWave) bands is seen as an attractive solution, primarily due to the bandwidth availability and possibility of large-scale multi-antenna communication. However, even though leveraging the large bandwidth at mmWave frequencies can potentially boost the wireless capacity and reduce the transmission delay for low-latency applications, mmWave communication is inherently unreliable due to its susceptibility to blockage, high path loss, and channel uncertainty. Hence, to provide URLLC and high-speed wireless access, it is desirable to seamlessly integrate the reliability of $\mu$W networks with the high capacity of mmWave networks. To this end, in this paper, the first comprehensive tutorial for integrated mmWave-$\mu$W communications is introduced. This envisioned integrated design will enable wireless networks to achieve URLLC along with high data rates by leveraging the best of two worlds: reliable, long-range communications at the $\mu$W bands and directional high-speed communications at the mmWave frequencies. To achieve this goal, key solution concepts are developed that include new architectures for the radio interface, URLLC-aware frame structure and resource allocation methods along with learning techniques, as well as mobility management, to realize the potential of integrated mmWave-$\mu$W communications. The opportunities and challenges of each proposed scheme are discussed and key results are presented.
  • In this paper, we consider the max-min signal-to-interference plus noise ratio (SINR) problem for the uplink transmission of a cell-free Massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) system. Assuming that the central processing unit (CPU) and the users exploit only the knowledge of the channel statistics, we first derive a closed-form expression for uplink rate. In particular, we enhance (or maximize) user fairness by solving the max-min optimization problem for user rate, by power allocation and choice of receiver coefficients, where the minimum uplink rate of the users is maximized with available transmit power at the particular user. Based on the derived closed-form expression for the uplink rate, we formulate the original user max-min problem to design the optimal receiver coefficients and user power allocations. However, this max-min SINR problem is not jointly convex in terms of design variables and therefore we decompose this original problem into two sub-problems, namely, receiver coefficient design and user power allocation. By iteratively solving these sub-problems, we develop an iterative algorithm to obtain the optimal receiver coefficient and user power allocations. In particular, the receiver coefficients design for a fixed user power allocation is formulated as generalized eigenvalue problem whereas a geometric programming (GP) approach is utilized to solve the power allocation problem for a given set of receiver coefficients. Numerical results confirm a three-fold increase in system rate over existing schemes in the literature.
  • We consider a cell-free Massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) system and investigate the system performance for the case when the quantized version of the estimated channel and the quantized received signal are available at the central processing unit (CPU), and the case when only the quantized version of the combined signal with maximum ratio combining (MRC) detector is available at the CPU. Next, we study the max-min optimization problem, where the minimum user uplink rate is maximized with backhaul capacity constraints. To deal with the max-min non-convex problem, we propose to decompose the original problem into two sub-problems. Based on these sub-problems, we develop an iterative scheme which solves the original max-min user uplink rate. Moreover, we present a user assignment algorithm to further improve the performance of cell-free Massive MIMO with limited backhaul links.
  • In this paper, we analyze and optimize the energy efficiency of downlink cellular networks. With the aid of tools from stochastic geometry, we introduce a new closed-form analytical expression of the potential spectral efficiency (bit/sec/m$^2$). In the interference-limited regime for data transmission, unlike currently available mathematical frameworks, the proposed analytical formulation depends on the transmit power and deployment density of the base stations. This is obtained by generalizing the definition of coverage probability and by accounting for the sensitivity of the receiver not only during the decoding of information data, but during the cell association phase as well. Based on the new formulation of the potential spectral efficiency, the energy efficiency (bit/Joule) is given in a tractable closed-form formula. An optimization problem is formulated and is comprehensively studied. It is mathematically proved, in particular, that the energy efficiency is a unimodal and strictly pseudo-concave function in the transmit power, given the density of the base stations, and in the density of the base stations, given the transmit power. Under these assumptions, therefore, a unique transmit power and density of the base stations exist, which maximize the energy efficiency. Numerical results are illustrated in order to confirm the obtained findings and to prove the usefulness of the proposed framework for optimizing the network planning and deployment of cellular networks from the energy efficiency standpoint.
  • Ensuring ultra-reliable and low-latency communication (URLLC) for 5G wireless networks and beyond is of capital importance and is currently receiving tremendous attention in academia and industry. At its core, URLLC mandates a departure from expected utility-based network design approaches, in which relying on average quantities (e.g., average throughput, average delay and average response time) is no longer an option but a necessity. Instead, a principled and scalable framework which takes into account delay, reliability, packet size, network architecture, and topology (across access, edge, and core) and decision-making under uncertainty is sorely lacking. The overarching goal of this article is a first step to fill this void. Towards this vision, after providing definitions of latency and reliability, we closely examine various enablers of URLLC and their inherent tradeoffs. Subsequently, we focus our attention on a plethora of techniques and methodologies pertaining to the requirements of ultra-reliable and low-latency communication, as well as their applications through selected use cases. These results provide crisp insights for the design of low-latency and high-reliable wireless networks.
  • In this paper, the effective use of multiple quadrotor drones as an aerial antenna array that provides wireless service to ground users is investigated. In particular, under the goal of minimizing the airborne service time needed for communicating with ground users, a novel framework for deploying and operating a drone-based antenna array system whose elements are single-antenna drones is proposed. In the considered model, the service time is minimized by jointly optimizing the wireless transmission time as well as the control time that is needed for movement and stabilization of the drones. To minimize the transmission time, first, the antenna array gain is maximized by optimizing the drone spacing within the array. In this case, using perturbation techniques, the drone spacing optimization problem is addressed by solving successive, perturbed convex optimization problems. Then, the optimal locations of the drones around the array's center are derived such that the transmission time for the user is minimized. Given the determined optimal locations of drones, the drones must spend a control time to adjust their positions dynamically so as to serve multiple users. To minimize this control time of the quadrotor drones, the speed of rotors is optimally adjusted based on both the destinations of the drones and external forces (e.g., wind and gravity). In particular, using bang-bang control theory, the optimal rotors' speeds as well as the minimum control time are derived in closed-form. Simulation results show that the proposed approach can significantly reduce the service time to ground users compared to a multi-drone scenario in which the same number of drones are deployed separately to serve ground users. The results also show that, in comparison with the multi-drones case, the network's spectral efficiency can be significantly improved.
  • Next-generation wireless networks must support ultra-reliable, low-latency communication and intelligently manage a massive number of Internet of Things (IoT) devices in real-time, within a highly dynamic environment. This need for stringent communication quality-of-service (QoS) requirements as well as mobile edge and core intelligence can only be realized by integrating fundamental notions of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning across the wireless infrastructure and end-user devices. In this context, this paper provides a comprehensive tutorial that introduces the main concepts of machine learning, in general, and artificial neural networks (ANNs), in particular, and their potential applications in wireless communications. For this purpose, we present a comprehensive overview on a number of key types of neural networks that include feed-forward, recurrent, spiking, and deep neural networks. For each type of neural network, we present the basic architecture and training procedure, as well as the associated challenges and opportunities. Then, we provide an in-depth overview on the variety of wireless communication problems that can be addressed using ANNs, ranging from communication using unmanned aerial vehicles to virtual reality and edge caching.For each individual application, we present the main motivation for using ANNs along with the associated challenges while also providing a detailed example for a use case scenario and outlining future works that can be addressed using ANNs. In a nutshell, this article constitutes one of the first holistic tutorials on the development of machine learning techniques tailored to the needs of future wireless networks.
  • In this paper, the efficient deployment and mobility of multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), used as aerial base stations to collect data from ground Internet of Things (IoT) devices, is investigated. In particular, to enable reliable uplink communications for IoT devices with a minimum total transmit power, a novel framework is proposed for jointly optimizing the three-dimensional (3D) placement and mobility of the UAVs, device-UAV association, and uplink power control. First, given the locations of active IoT devices at each time instant, the optimal UAVs' locations and associations are determined. Next, to dynamically serve the IoT devices in a time-varying network, the optimal mobility patterns of the UAVs are analyzed. To this end, based on the activation process of the IoT devices, the time instances at which the UAVs must update their locations are derived. Moreover, the optimal 3D trajectory of each UAV is obtained in a way that the total energy used for the mobility of the UAVs is minimized while serving the IoT devices. Simulation results show that, using the proposed approach, the total transmit power of the IoT devices is reduced by 45% compared to a case in which stationary aerial base stations are deployed. In addition, the proposed approach can yield a maximum of 28% enhanced system reliability compared to the stationary case. The results also reveal an inherent tradeoff between the number of update times, the mobility of the UAVs, and the transmit power of the IoT devices. In essence, a higher number of updates can lead to lower transmit powers for the IoT devices at the cost of an increased mobility for the UAVs.
  • Millimeter wave (mmW) communications at the 60 GHz unlicensed band is seen as a promising approach for boosting the capacity of wireless local area networks (WLANs). If properly integrated into legacy IEEE 802.11 standards, mmW communications can offer substantial gains by offloading traffic from congested sub-6 GHz unlicensed bands to the 60 GHz mmW frequency band. In this paper, a novel medium access control (MAC) is proposed to dynamically manage the WLAN traffic over the unlicensed mmW and sub-6 GHz bands. The proposed protocol leverages the capability of advanced multi-band wireless stations (STAs) to perform fast session transfers (FST) to the mmW band, while considering the intermittent channel at the 60 GHz band and the level of congestion observed over the sub-6 GHz bands. The performance of the proposed scheme is analytically studied via a new Markov chain model and the probability of transmissions over the mmW and sub-6 GHz bands, as well as the aggregated saturation throughput are derived. In addition, analytical results are validated by simulation results. Simulation results show that the proposed integrated mmW-sub 6 GHz MAC protocol yields significant performance gains, in terms of maximizing the saturation throughput and minimizing the delay experienced by the STAs. The results also shed light on the tradeoffs between the achievable gains and the overhead introduced by the FST procedure.
  • We study the problem of joint load balancing and interference mitigation in heterogeneous networks (HetNets) in which massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) macro cell base station (BS) equipped with a large number of antennas, overlaid with wireless self-backhauled small cells (SCs) are assumed. Self-backhauled SC BSs with full-duplex communication employing regular antenna arrays serve both macro users and SC users by using the wireless backhaul from macro BS in the same frequency band. We formulate the joint load balancing and interference mitigation problem as a network utility maximization subject to wireless backhaul constraints. Subsequently, leveraging the framework of stochastic optimization, the problem is decoupled into dynamic scheduling of macro cell users, backhaul provisioning of SCs, and offloading macro cell users to SCs as a function of interference and backhaul links. Via numerical results, we show the performance gains of our proposed framework under the impact of small cells density, number of base station antennas, and transmit power levels at low and high frequency bands. We further provide insights into the performance analysis and convergence of the proposed framework. The numerical results show that the proposed user association algorithm outperforms other baselines. Interestingly, we find that even at lower frequency band the performance of open access small cell is close to that of closed access at some operating points, the open access full- duplex small cell still yields higher gain as compared to the closed access at higher frequency bands. With increasing the small cell density or the wireless backhaul quality, the open access full- duplex small cells outperform and achieve a 5.6x gain in terms of cell-edge performance as compared to the closed access ones in ultra-dense networks with 350 small cell base stations per km2 .
  • In this paper, the problem of uplink (UL) and downlink (DL) resource optimization, mode selection and power allocation is studied for wireless cellular networks under the assumption of in-band full duplex (IBFD) base stations, non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) operation, and queue stability constraints. The problem is formulated as a network utility maximization problem for which a Lyapunov framework is used to decompose it into two disjoint subproblems of auxiliary variable selection and rate maximization. The latter is further decoupled into a user association and mode selection (UAMS) problem and a UL/DL power optimization (UDPO) problem that are solved concurrently. The UAMS problem is modeled as a many-to-one matching problem to associate users to small cell base stations (SBSs) and select transmission mode (half/full-duplex and orthogonal/non-orthogonal multiple access), and an algorithm is proposed to solve the problem converging to a pairwise stable matching. Subsequently, the UDPO problem is formulated as a sequence of convex problems and is solved using the concave-convex procedure. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme to allocate UL and DL power levels after dynamically selecting the operating mode and the served users, under different traffic intensity conditions, network density, and self-interference cancellation capability. The proposed scheme is shown to achieve up to 63% and 73% of gains in UL and DL packet throughput, and 21% and 17% in UL and DL cell edge throughput, respectively, compared to existing baseline schemes.
  • In this paper, a novel framework for delay-optimal cell association in unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)-enabled cellular networks is proposed. In particular, to minimize the average network delay under any arbitrary spatial distribution of the ground users, the optimal cell partitions of UAVs and terrestrial base stations (BSs) are determined. To this end, using the powerful mathematical tools of optimal transport theory, the existence of the solution to the optimal cell association problem is proved and the solution space is completely characterized. The analytical and simulation results show that the proposed approach yields substantial improvements of the average network delay.
  • Caching at the edge is a promising technique to cope with the increasing data demand in wireless networks. This paper analyzes the performance of cellular networks consisting of a tier macro-cell wireless backhaul nodes overlaid with a tier of cache-aided small cells. We consider both static and dynamic association policies for content delivery to the user terminals and analyze their performance. In particular, we derive closed-form expressions for the area spectral efficiency and the energy efficiency, which are used to optimize relevant design parameters such as the density of cache-aided small cells and the storage size. By means of this approach, we are able to draw useful design insights for the deployment of highly performing cache-aided tiered networks.
  • In this paper, we study the problem of joint inband backhauling and interference mitigation in 5G heterogeneous networks (HetNets) in which a massive multiple-input multipleoutput (MIMO) macro cell base station equipped with a large number of antennas, overlaid with self-backhauled small cells is assumed. This problem is cast as a network utility maximization subject to wireless backhaul constraints. Due to the non-tractability of the problem, we first resort to random matrix theory to get a closed-form expression of the achievable rate and transmit power in the asymptotic regime, i.e., as the number of antennas and users grows large. Subsequently, leveraging the framework of stochastic optimization, the problem is decoupled into dynamic scheduling of macro cell users and backhaul provisioning of small cells as a function of interference and backhaul links. Via simulations, we evaluate the performance gains of our proposed framework under different network architectures and low/high frequency bands. Our proposed HetNet method achieves the achievable average UE throughput of 1.7 Gbps as well as ensures 1 Gbps cell-edge UE throughput when serving 200 UEs per km2 at 28 GHz with 1 GHz bandwidth. In ultra-dense network, the UE throughput at 28 GHz achieves 62x gain as compared to 2.4 GHz.
  • Ultra-reliability and low-latency are two key components in 5G networks. In this letter, we investigate the problem of ultra-reliable and low-latency communication (URLLC) in millimeter wave (mmWave)-enabled massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) networks. The problem is cast as a network utility maximization subject to probabilistic latency and reliability constraints. To solve this problem, we resort to the Lyapunov technique whereby a utility-delay control approach is proposed, which adapts to channel variations and queue dynamics. Numerical results demonstrate that our proposed approach ensures reliable communication with a guaranteed probability of 99.99%, and reduces latency by 28.41% and 77.11% as compared to baselines with and without probabilistic latency constraints, respectively.
  • With the introduction of caching capabilities into small cell networks (SCNs), new backaul management mechanisms need to be developed to prevent the predicted files that are downloaded by the at the small base stations (SBSs) to be cached from jeopardizing the urgent requests that need to be served via the backhaul. Moreover, these mechanisms must account for the heterogeneity of the backhaul that will be encompassing both wireless backhaul links at various frequency bands and a wired backhaul component. In this paper, the heterogeneous backhaul management problem is formulated as a minority game in which each SBS has to define the number of predicted files to download, without affecting the required transmission rate of the current requests. For the formulated game, it is shown that a unique fair proper mixed Nash equilibrium (PMNE) exists. Self-organizing reinforcement learning algorithm is proposed and proved to converge to a unique Boltzmann-Gibbs equilibrium which approximates the desired PMNE. Simulation results show that the performance of the proposed approach can be close to that of the ideal optimal algorithm while it outperforms a centralized greedy approach in terms of the amount of data that is cached without jeopardizing the quality-of-service of current requests.