• Contention resolution schemes have proven to be an incredibly powerful concept which allows to tackle a broad class of problems. The framework has been initially designed to handle submodular optimization under various types of constraints, that is, intersections of exchange systems (including matroids), knapsacks, and unsplittable flows on trees. Later on, it turned out that this framework perfectly extends to optimization under uncertainty, like stochastic probing and online selection problems, which further can be applied to mechanism design. We add to this line of work by showing how to create contention resolution schemes for intersection of matroids and knapsacks when we work in the random order setting. More precisely, we do know the whole universe of elements in advance, but they appear in an order given by a random permutation. Upon arrival we need to irrevocably decide whether to take an element or not. We bring a novel technique for analyzing procedures in the random order setting that is based on the martingale theory. This unified approach makes it easier to combine constraints, and we do not need to rely on the monotonicity of contention resolution schemes. Our paper fills the gaps, extends, and creates connections between many previous results and techniques. The main application of our framework is a $k+4+\varepsilon$ approximation ratio for the Bayesian multi-parameter unit-demand mechanism design under the constraint of $k$ matroids intersection, which improves upon the previous bounds of $4k-2$ and $e(k+1)$. Other results include improved approximation ratios for stochastic $k$-set packing and submodular stochastic probing over arbitrary non-negative submodular objective function, whereas previous results required the objective to be monotone.
  • The subject of this paper is the time complexity of approximating Knapsack, Subset Sum, Partition, and some other related problems. The main result is an $\widetilde{O}(n+1/\varepsilon^{5/3})$ time randomized FPTAS for Partition, which is derived from a certain relaxed form of a randomized FPTAS for Subset Sum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first NP-hard problem that has been shown to admit a subquadratic time approximation scheme, i.e., one with time complexity of $O((n+1/\varepsilon)^{2-\delta})$ for some $\delta>0$. To put these developments in context, note that a quadratic FPTAS for Partition has been known for 40 years. Our main contribution lies in designing a mechanism that reduces an instance of Subset Sum to several simpler instances, each with some special structure, and keeps track of interactions between them. This allows us to combine techniques from approximation algorithms, pseudo-polynomial algorithms, and additive combinatorics. We also prove several related results. Notably, we improve approximation schemes for 3-SUM, (min,+)-convolution, and Tree Sparsity. Finally, we argue why breaking the quadratic barrier for approximate Knapsack is unlikely by giving an $\Omega((n+1/\varepsilon)^{2-o(1)})$ conditional lower bound.
  • We study the problem of deleting the smallest set $S$ of vertices (resp.\ edges) from a given graph $G$ such that the induced subgraph (resp.\ subgraph) $G \setminus S$ belongs to some class $\mathcal{H}$. We consider the case where graphs in $\mathcal{H}$ have treewidth bounded by $t$, and give a general framework to obtain approximation algorithms for both vertex and edge-deletion settings from approximation algorithms for certain natural graph partitioning problems called $k$-Subset Vertex Separator and $k$-Subset Edge Separator, respectively. For the vertex deletion setting, our framework combined with the current best result for $k$-Subset Vertex Separator, yields a significant improvement in the approximation ratios for basic problems such as $k$-Treewidth Vertex Deletion and Planar-$F$ Vertex Deletion. Our algorithms are simpler than previous works and give the first uniform approximation algorithms under the natural parameterization. For the edge deletion setting, we give improved approximation algorithms for $k$-Subset Edge Separator combining ideas from LP relaxations and important separators. We present their applications in bounded-degree graphs, and also give an APX-hardness result for the edge deletion problems.
  • In recent years, significant progress has been made in explaining the apparent hardness of improving upon the naive solutions for many fundamental polynomially solvable problems. This progress has come in the form of conditional lower bounds -- reductions from a problem assumed to be hard. The hard problems include 3SUM, All-Pairs Shortest Path, SAT, Orthogonal Vectors, and others. In the $(\min,+)$-convolution problem, the goal is to compute a sequence $(c[i])^{n-1}_{i=0}$, where $c[k] = $ $\min_{i=0,\ldots,k} $ $\{a[i] $ $+$ $b[k-i]\}$, given sequences $(a[i])^{n-1}_{i=0}$ and $(b[i])_{i=0}^{n-1}$. This can easily be done in $O(n^2)$ time, but no $O(n^{2-\varepsilon})$ algorithm is known for $\varepsilon > 0$. In this paper, we undertake a systematic study of the $(\min,+)$-convolution problem as a hardness assumption. First, we establish the equivalence of this problem to a group of other problems, including variants of the classic knapsack problem and problems related to subadditive sequences. The $(\min,+)$-convolution problem has been used as a building block in algorithms for many problems, notably problems in stringology. It has also appeared as an ad hoc hardness assumption. Second, we investigate some of these connections and provide new reductions and other results. We also explain why replacing this assumption with the SETH might not be possible for some problems.
  • We introduce the Non-commutative Subset Convolution - a convolution of functions useful when working with determinant-based algorithms. In order to compute it efficiently, we take advantage of Clifford algebras, a generalization of quaternions used mainly in the quantum field theory. We apply this tool to speed up algorithms counting subgraphs parameterized by the treewidth of a graph. We present an $O^*((2^\omega + 1)^{tw})$-time algorithm for counting Steiner trees and an $O^*((2^\omega + 2)^{tw})$-time algorithm for counting Hamiltonian cycles, both of which improve the previously known upper bounds. The result for Steiner Tree also translates into a deterministic algorithm for Feedback Vertex Set. All of these constitute the best known running times of deterministic algorithms for decision versions of these problems and they match the best obtained running times for pathwidth parameterization under assumption $\omega = 2$.
  • In the classical Maximum Acyclic Subgraph problem (MAS), given a directed-edge weighted graph, we are required to find an ordering of the nodes that maximizes the total weight of forward-directed edges. MAS admits a 2 approximation, and this approximation is optimal under the Unique Game Conjecture. In this paper we consider a generalization of MAS, the Restricted Maximum Acyclic Subgraph problem (RMAS), where each node is associated with a list of integer labels, and we have to find a labeling of the nodes so as to maximize the weight of edges whose head label is larger than the tail label. The best known (almost trivial) approximation for RMAS is 4. The interest of RMAS is mostly due to its connections with the Vertex Pricing problem (VP). In VP we are given an undirected graph with positive edge budgets. A feasible solution consists of an assignment of non-negative prices to the nodes. The profit for each edge $e$ is the sum of its endpoints prices if that sum is at most the budget of $e$, and zero otherwise. Our goal is to maximize the total profit. The best known approximation for VP, which works analogously to the mentioned approximation algorithm for RMAS, is 4. Improving on that is a challenging open problem. On the other hand, the best known 2 inapproximability result is due to a reduction from a special case of RMAS. In this paper we present an improved LP-rounding $2\sqrt{2}$ approximation for RMAS. Our result shows that, in order to prove a 4 hardness of approximation result for VP (if possible), one should consider reductions from harder problems. Alternatively, our approach might suggest a different way to design approximation algorithms for VP.
  • The ability to represent intracellular biochemical dynamics via deterministic and stochastic modelling is one of the crucial components to move biological sciences in the observe-predict-control-design knowledge ladder. Compared to the engineering or physics problems, dynamical models in quantitative biology typically dependent on a relatively large number of parameters. Therefore, the relationship between model parameters and dynamics is often prohibitively difficult to determine. We developed a method to depict the input-output relationship for multi-parametric stochastic and deterministic models via information-theoretic quantification of similarity between model parameters and modules. Identification of most information-theoretically orthogonal biological components, provided mathematical language to precisely communicate and visualise compensation like phenomena such as biological robustness, sloppiness and statistical non-identifiability. A comprehensive analysis of the multi-parameter NF-$\kappa$B signalling pathway demonstrates that the information-theoretic similarity reflects a topological structure of the network. Examination of the currently available experimental data on this system reveals the number of identifiable parameters and suggests informative experimental protocols.