• The edges of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the quantum Hall effect (QHE) regime are divided into alternating metallic and insulating strips, with their widths determined by the energy gaps of the QHE states and the electrostatic Coulomb interaction. Local probing of these submicrometer features, however, is challenging due to the buried 2DEG structures. Using a newly developed microwave impedance microscope, we demonstrate the real-space conductivity mapping of the edge and bulk states. The sizes, positions, and field dependence of the edge strips around the sample perimeter agree quantitatively with the self-consistent electrostatic picture. The evolution of microwave images as a function of magnetic fields provides rich microscopic information around the \nu = 2 QHE state.
  • We report the instrumentation and experimental results of a cryogenic scanning microwave impedance microscope. The microwave probe and the scanning stage are located inside the variable temperature insert of a helium cryostat. Microwave signals in the distance modulation mode are used for monitoring the tip-sample distance and adjusting the phase of the two output channels. The ability to spatially resolve the metal-insulator transition in a doped silicon sample is demonstrated. The data agree with a semi-quantitative finite-element simulation. Effects of the thermal energy and electric fields on local charge carriers can be seen in the images taken at different temperatures and DC biases.
  • Many unusual behaviors in complex oxides are deeply associated with the spontaneous emergence of microscopic phase separation. Depending on the underlying mechanism, the competing phases can form ordered or random patterns at vastly different length scales. Using a microwave impedance microscope, we observed an orientation-ordered percolating network in strained Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3 thin films with a large period of 100 nm. The filamentary metallic domains align preferentially along certain crystal axes of the substrate, suggesting the anisotropic elastic strain as the key interaction in this system. The local impedance maps provide microscopic electrical information of the hysteretic behavior in strained thin film manganites, suggesting close connection between the glassy order and the colossal magnetoresistance effects at low temperatures.
  • Ultra-thin topological insulator nanostructures, in which coupling between top and bottom surface states takes place, are of great intellectual and practical importance. Due to the weak Van der Waals interaction between adjacent quintuple layers (QLs), the layered bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3), a single Dirac-cone topological insulator with a large bulk gap, can be exfoliated down to a few QLs. In this paper, we report the first controlled mechanical exfoliation of Bi2Se3 nanoribbons (> 50 QLs) by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip down to a single QL. Microwave impedance microscopy is employed to map out the local conductivity of such ultra-thin nanoribbons, showing drastic difference in sheet resistance between 1~2 QLs and 4~5 QLs. Transport measurement carried out on an exfoliated (\leq 5 QLs) Bi2Se3 device shows non-metallic temperature dependence of resistance, in sharp contrast to the metallic behavior seen in thick (> 50 QLs) ribbons. These AFM-exfoliated thin nanoribbons afford interesting candidates for studying the transition from quantum spin Hall surface to edge states.
  • Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces.
  • Driven by interactions due to the charge, spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom, nanoscale inhomogeneity has emerged as a new theme for materials with novel properties near multiphase boundaries. As vividly demonstrated in complex metal oxides and chalcogenides, these microscopic phases are of great scientific and technological importance for research in high-temperature superconductors, colossal magnetoresistance effect, phase-change memories, and domain switching operations. Direct imaging on dielectric properties of these local phases, however, presents a big challenge for existing scanning probe techniques. Here, we report the observation of electronic inhomogeneity in indium selenide (In2Se3) nanoribbons by near-field scanning microwave impedance microscopy. Multiple phases with local resistivity spanning six orders of magnitude are identified as the coexistence of superlattice, simple hexagonal lattice and amorphous structures with 100nm inhomogeneous length scale, consistent with high-resolution transmission electron microscope studies. The atomic-force-microscope-compatible microwave probe is able to perform quantitative sub-surface electronic study in a noninvasive manner. Finally, the phase change memory function in In2Se3 nanoribbon devices can be locally recorded with big signal of opposite signs.