• Alan McConnachie, Carine Babusiaux, Michael Balogh, Simon Driver, Pat Côté, Helene Courtois, Luke Davies, Laura Ferrarese, Sarah Gallagher, Rodrigo Ibata, Nicolas Martin, Aaron Robotham, Kim Venn, Eva Villaver, Jo Bovy, Alessandro Boselli, Matthew Colless, Johan Comparat, Kelly Denny, Pierre-Alain Duc, Sara Ellison, Richard de Grijs, Mirian Fernandez-Lorenzo, Ken Freeman, Raja Guhathakurta, Patrick Hall, Andrew Hopkins, Mike Hudson, Andrew Johnson, Nick Kaiser, Jun Koda, Iraklis Konstantopoulos, George Koshy, Khee-Gan Lee, Adi Nusser, Anna Pancoast, Eric Peng, Celine Peroux, Patrick Petitjean, Christophe Pichon, Bianca Poggianti, Carlo Schmid, Prajval Shastri, Yue Shen, Chris Willot, Scott Croom, Rosine Lallement, Carlo Schimd, Dan Smith, Matthew Walker, Jon Willis, Alessandro Bosselli Matthew Colless, Aruna Goswami, Matt Jarvis, Eric Jullo, Jean-Paul Kneib, Iraklis Konstantopoloulous, Jeff Newman, Johan Richard, Firoza Sutaria, Edwar Taylor, Ludovic van Waerbeke, Giuseppina Battaglia, Pat Hall, Misha Haywood, Charli Sakari, Carlo Schmid, Arnaud Seibert, Sivarani Thirupathi, Yuting Wang, Yiping Wang, Ferdinand Babas, Steve Bauman, Elisabetta Caffau, Mary Beth Laychak, David Crampton, Daniel Devost, Nicolas Flagey, Zhanwen Han, Clare Higgs, Vanessa Hill, Kevin Ho, Sidik Isani, Shan Mignot, Rick Murowinski, Gajendra Pandey, Derrick Salmon, Arnaud Siebert, Doug Simons, Else Starkenburg, Kei Szeto, Brent Tully, Tom Vermeulen, Kanoa Withington, Nobuo Arimoto, Martin Asplund, Herve Aussel, Michele Bannister, Harish Bhatt, SS Bhargavi, John Blakeslee, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James Bullock, Denis Burgarella, Tzu-Ching Chang, Andrew Cole, Jeff Cooke, Andrew Cooper, Paola Di Matteo, Ginevra Favole, Hector Flores, Bryan Gaensler, Peter Garnavich, Karoline Gilbert, Rosa Gonzalez-Delgado, Puragra Guhathakurta, Guenther Hasinger, Falk Herwig, Narae Hwang, Pascale Jablonka, Matthew Jarvis, Umanath Kamath, Lisa Kewley, Damien Le Borgne, Geraint Lewis, Robert Lupton, Sarah Martell, Mario Mateo, Olga Mena, David Nataf, Jeffrey Newman, Enrique Pérez, Francisco Prada, Mathieu Puech, Alejandra Recio-Blanco, Annie Robin, Will Saunders, Daniel Smith, C.S. Stalin, Charling Tao, Karun Thanjuvur, Laurence Tresse, Ludo van Waerbeke, Jian-Min Wang, David Yong, Gongbo Zhao, Patrick Boisse, James Bolton, Piercarlo Bonifacio, Francois Bouchy, Len Cowie, Katia Cunha, Magali Deleuil, Ernst de Mooij, Patrick Dufour, Sebastien Foucaud, Karl Glazebrook, John Hutchings, Chiaki Kobayashi, Rolf-Peter Kudritzki, Yang-Shyang Li, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Martin Makler, Norio Narita, Changbom Park, Ryan Ransom, Swara Ravindranath, Bacham Eswar Reddy, Marcin Sawicki, Luc Simard, Raghunathan Srianand, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, Keiichi Umetsu, Ting-Gui Wang, Jong-Hak Woo, Xue-Bing Wu
    May 31, 2016 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    MSE is an 11.25m aperture observatory with a 1.5 square degree field of view that will be fully dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy. More than 3200 fibres will feed spectrographs operating at low (R ~ 2000 - 3500) and moderate (R ~ 6000) spectral resolution, and approximately 1000 fibers will feed spectrographs operating at high (R ~ 40000) resolution. MSE is designed to enable transformational science in areas as diverse as tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of thick disk and halo stars; connecting galaxies to their large scale structure; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars; next generation cosmological surveys using redshift space distortions and peculiar velocities. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, WFIRST, PLATO, and the SKA, and is designed to complement and go beyond the science goals of other planned and current spectroscopic capabilities like VISTA/4MOST, WHT/WEAVE, AAT/HERMES and Subaru/PFS. It is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT, and provides the missing link between wide field imaging and small field precision astronomy. MSE is optimized for high throughput, high signal-to-noise observations of the faintest sources in the Universe with high quality calibration and stability being ensured through the dedicated operational mode of the observatory. (abridged)
  • This short document is intended as a companion and introduction to the Detailed Science Case (DSC) for the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer. It provides a concise summary of the essential characteristics of MSE from the perspective of the international astronomical community. MSE is a wide field telescope (1.5 square degree field of view) with an aperture of 11.25m. It is dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy at several different spectral resolutions in the range R ~ 2500 - 40000 over a broad wavelength range (0.36 - 1.8{\mu}m). MSE will enable transformational science in areas as diverse as exoplanetary host characterization; stellar monitoring campaigns; tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of the distant Galaxy; connecting galaxies to the large scale structure of the Universe; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars. MSE is the largest ground based optical and near infrared telescope in its class, and it will occupy a unique and critical role in the emerging network of astronomical facilities active in the 2020s. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, eROSITA, SKA, and WFIRST, and is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT.
  • Using data from the SDSS-DR7, including structural measurements from 2D surface brightness fits with GIM2D, we show how the fraction of quiescent galaxies depends on galaxy stellar mass $M_*$, effective radius $R_e$, fraction of $r-$band light in the bulge, $B/T$, and their status as a central or satellite galaxy at $0.01<z<0.2$. For central galaxies we confirm that the quiescent fraction depends not only on stellar mass, but also on $R_e$. The dependence is particularly strong as a function of $M_*/R_e^\alpha$, with $\alpha\sim 1.5$. This appears to be driven by a simple dependence on $B/T$ over the mass range $9 < \log(M_*/M_\odot) < 11.5$, and is qualitatively similar even if galaxies with $B/T>0.3$ are excluded. For satellite galaxies, the quiescent fraction is always larger than that of central galaxies, for any combination of $M_*$, $R_e$ and $B/T$. The quenching efficiency is not constant, but reaches a maximum of $\sim 0.7$ for galaxies with $9 < \log(M_*/M_\odot) < 9.5$ and $R_e<1$ kpc. This is the same region of parameter space in which the satellite fraction itself reaches its maximum value, suggesting that the transformation from an active central galaxy to a quiescent satellite is associated with a reduction in $R_e$ due to an increase in dominance of a bulge component.
  • We investigate the velocity vs. position phase space of z ~ 1 cluster galaxies using a set of 424 spectroscopic redshifts in 9 clusters drawn from the GCLASS survey. Dividing the galaxy population into three categories: quiescent, star-forming, and poststarburst, we find that these populations have distinct distributions in phase space. Most striking are the poststarburst galaxies, which are commonly found at small clustercentric radii with high clustercentric velocities, and appear to trace a coherent ``ring" in phase space. Using several zoom simulations of clusters we show that the coherent distribution of the poststarbursts can be reasonably well-reproduced using a simple quenching scenario. Specifically, the phase space is best reproduced if satellite quenching occurs on a rapid timescale (0.1 < tau_{Q} < 0.5 Gyr) after galaxies make their first passage of R ~ 0.5R_{200}, a process that takes a total time of ~ 1 Gyr after first infall. We compare this quenching timescale to the timescale implied by the stellar populations of the poststarburst galaxies and find that the poststarburst spectra are well-fit by a rapid quenching (tau_{Q} = 0.4^{+0.3}_{-0.4} Gyr) of a typical star-forming galaxy. The similarity between the quenching timescales derived from these independent indicators is a strong consistency check of the quenching model. Given that the model implies satellite quenching is rapid, and occurs well within R_{200}, this would suggest that ram-pressure stripping of either the hot or cold gas component of galaxies are the most plausible candidates for the physical mechanism. The high cold gas consumption rates at z ~ 1 make it difficult to determine if hot or cold gas stripping is dominant; however, measurements of the redshift evolution of the satellite quenching timescale and location may be capable of distinguishing between the two.
  • We derive rotation curves from optical emission lines of 182 disk galaxies (96 in the cluster and 86 in the field) in the region of Abell 901/902 located at $z\sim 0.165$. We focus on the analysis of B-band and stellar-mass Tully-Fisher relations. We examine possible environmental dependencies and differences between normal spirals and "dusty red" galaxies, i.e. disk galaxies that have red colors due to relatively low star formation rates. We find no significant differences between the best-fit TF slope of cluster and field galaxies. At fixed slope, the field population with high-quality rotation curves (57 objects) is brighter by $\Delta M_{B}=-0\fm42\pm0\fm15$ than the cluster population (55 objects). We show that this slight difference is at least in part an environmental effect. The scatter of the cluster TFR increases for galaxies closer to the core region, also indicating an environmental effect. Interestingly, dusty red galaxies become fainter towards the core at given rotation velocity (i.e. total mass). This indicates that the star formation in these galaxies is in the process of being quenched. The luminosities of normal spiral galaxies are slightly higher at fixed rotation velocity for smaller cluster-centric radii. Probably these galaxies are gas-rich (compared to the dusty red population) and the onset of ram-pressure stripping increases their star-formation rates. The results from the TF analysis are consistent with and complement our previous findings. Dusty red galaxies might be an intermediate stage in the transformation of infalling field spiral galaxies into cluster S0s, and this might explain the well-known increase of the S0 fraction in galaxy clusters with cosmic time.
  • We perform a quantitative morphological comparison between the hosts of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and quiescent galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z~0.7). The imaging data are taken from the large HST/ACS mosaics of the GEMS and STAGES surveys. Our main aim is to test whether nuclear activity at this cosmic epoch is triggered by major mergers. Using images of quiescent galaxies and stars, we create synthetic AGN images to investigate the impact of an optical nucleus on the morphological analysis of AGN hosts. Galaxy morphologies are parameterized using the asymmetry index A, concentration index C, Gini coefficient G and M20 index. A sample of ~200 synthetic AGN is matched to 21 real AGN in terms of redshift, host brightness and host-to-nucleus ratio to ensure a reliable comparison between active and quiescent galaxies. The optical nuclei strongly affect the morphological parameters of the underlying host galaxy. Taking these effects into account, we find that the morphologies of the AGN hosts are clearly distinct from galaxies undergoing violent gravitational interactions. In fact, the host galaxies' distributions in morphological descriptor space are more similar to undisturbed galaxies than major mergers. Intermediate-luminosity (Lx < 10^44 erg/s) AGN hosts at z~0.7 show morphologies similar to the general population of massive galaxies with significant bulges at the same redshifts. If major mergers are the driver of nuclear activity at this epoch, the signatures of gravitational interactions fade rapidly before the optical AGN phase starts, making them undetectable on single-orbit HST images, at least with usual morphological descriptors. This could be investigated in future synthetic observations created from numerical simulations of galaxy-galaxy interactions.
  • We evaluate the effects of environment and stellar mass on galaxy properties at 0.85 < z < 1.20 using a 3.6um-selected spectroscopic sample of 797 cluster and field galaxies drawn from the GCLASS survey. We confirm that for galaxies with LogM* > 9.3 the well-known correlations between environment and properties such as star-forming fraction (f_SF), SFR, SSFR, D(4000), and color are already in place at z ~ 1. We separate the effects of environment and stellar mass on galaxies by comparing the properties of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at fixed environment, and fixed stellar mass. The SSFR of star-forming galaxies at fixed environment is correlated with stellar mass; however, at fixed stellar mass it is independent of environment. The same trend exists for the D(4000) measures of both the star-forming and quiescent galaxies and shows that their properties are determined primarily by their stellar mass, not by their environment. Instead, it appears that environment's primary role is to control the fraction of star-forming galaxies. Using the spectra we identify candidate poststarburst galaxies and find that those with 9.3 < LogM* < 10.7 are 3.1 +/- 1.1 times more common in high-density regions compared to low-density regions. The clear association of poststarbursts with high-density regions as well as the lack of a correlation between the SSFRs and D(4000)s of star-forming galaxies with their environment suggests that at z ~ 1 the environmental-quenching timescale must be rapid. Lastly, we construct a simple quenching model which demonstrates that the lack of a correlation between the D(4000) of quiescent galaxies and their environment results naturally if self quenching dominates over environmental quenching at z > 1, or if the evolution of the self-quenching rate mirrors the evolution of the environmental-quenching rate at z > 1, regardless of which dominates.
  • Using the optical data from the Wide component of the CFHT Legacy Survey, and new ultraviolet data from GALEX, we study the colours and specific star formation rates (SSFR) of ~100 galaxy clusters at 0.16<z<0.36, over areas extending out to radii of r~7Mpc. We use a multicolour, statistical background subtraction method to study the galaxy population at this radius; thus our results pertain to those galaxies which constitute an excess over the average field density. We find that the average SSFR, and its distribution, of the star-forming galaxies (with SFR>0.7 M_sun/yr at z~0.2 and SFR>1.2 M_sun/yr at z~0.3) have no measurable dependence on the cluster-centric radius, and are consistent with the field values. However, the fraction of galaxies with SFR above these thresholds, and the fraction of optically blue galaxies, are lower for the overdense galaxy population in the cluster outskirts compared with the average field value, at all stellar masses M*>10^{9.8} M_sun and at all radii out to at least 7Mpc. Most interestingly, the fraction of blue galaxies that are forming stars at a rate below our UV detection limit is much higher in all radial bins around our cluster sample, compared with the general field value. This is most noticeable for massive galaxies M*>10^{10.7} M_sun; while almost all blue field galaxies of this mass have detectable star formation, this is true for less than 20% of the blue cluster galaxies, even at 7Mpc from the cluster centre. Our results support a scenario where galaxies are pre-processed in locally overdense regions, in a way that reduces their SFR below our UV detection limit, but not to zero.
  • Using the sample from the \it Redshift One LDSS3 Emission line Survey \rm (ROLES), we probe the dependence of star formation rate (SFR) and specific star formation rate (sSFR) as a function of stellar mass $M_*$ and environment as defined by local galaxy density, in the CDFS field. Our spectroscopic sample consists of 312 galaxies with $K_{AB}<24$, corresponding to stellar mass $\log(M_*/M_{\sun})>8.5$, and with [OII] derived star-formation rates SFR$>0.3M_{\sun}/$yr, at $0.889\leq z \leq 1.149$. The results have been compared directly with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 sample at $0.032\leq z \leq 0.05$. For star-forming galaxies, we confirm that there is little correlation between SFR and density at $z\sim 0$. However, for the lowest mass galaxies in our $z\sim 1$ sample, those with $\log(M_*/M_{\sun})<10$, we find that both the median SFR and specific SFR {\it increase} significantly with increasing local density. The "downsizing" trend for low mass galaxies to be quenched progressively later in time appears to be more pronounced in moderately overdense environments. Overall we find that the evolution of star-formation in galaxies is most strongly driven by their stellar mass, with local galaxy density playing a role that becomes increasingly important for lower mass galaxies.
  • Both observations and simulations show that major tidal interactions or mergers between gas-rich galaxies can lead to intense bursts of starformation. Yet, the average enhancement in star formation rate (SFR) in major mergers and the contribution of such events to the cosmic SFR are not well estimated. Here we use photometric redshifts, stellar masses and UV SFRs from COMBO-17, 24 micron SFRs from Spitzer and morphologies from two deep HST cosmological survey fields (ECDFS/GEMS and A901/STAGES) to study the enhancement in SFR as a function of projected galaxy separation. We apply two-point projected correlation function techniques, which we augment with morphologically-selected very close pairs (separation <2 arcsec) and merger remnants from the HST imaging. Our analysis confirms that the most intensely star-forming systems are indeed interacting or merging. Yet, for massive (M* > 10^10 Msun) star-forming galaxies at 0.4<z<0.8, we find that the SFRs of galaxies undergoing a major interaction (mass ratios <1:4 and separations < 40 kpc) are only 1.80 +/- 0.30 times higher than the SFRs of non-interacting galaxies when averaged over all interactions and all stages of the interaction, in good agreement with other observational works. We demonstrate that these results imply that <10% of star formation at 0.4 < z < 0.8 is triggered directly by major mergers and interactions; these events are not important factors in the build-up of stellar mass since z=1.
  • Galaxies migrate from the blue cloud to the red sequence when their star formation is quenched. Here, we report on galaxies quenched by environmental effects and not by mergers or strong AGN as often invoked: They form stars at a reduced rate which is optically even less conspicuous, and manifest a transition population of blue spirals evolving into S0 galaxies. These 'optically passive' or 'red spirals' are found in large numbers in the STAGES project (and by Galaxy Zoo) in the infall region of clusters and groups.
  • We use a K-selected (22.5 < K_AB < 24.0) sample of dwarf galaxies (8.4 < log(M*/Msun) < 10) at 0.89<z<1.15 in the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) to measure their contribution to the global star-formation rate density (SFRD), as inferred from their [OII] flux. By comparing with [OII]-based studies of higher stellar mass galaxies, we robustly measure a turnover in the [OII] luminosity density at a stellar mass of M~10^10 Msun. By comparison with the [OII]-based SFRD measured from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we confirm that, while the SFRD of the lowest-mass galaxies changes very little with time, the SFRD of more massive galaxies evolves strongly, such that they dominate the SFRD at z = 1.
  • We investigate the properties of optically passive spirals and dusty red galaxies in the A901/2 cluster complex at redshift ~0.17 using restframe near-UV-optical SEDs, 24 micron IR data and HST morphologies from the STAGES dataset. The cluster sample is based on COMBO-17 redshifts with an rms precision of sigma_cz~2000 km/sec. We find that 'dusty red galaxies' and 'optically passive spirals' in A901/2 are largely the same phenomenon, and that they form stars at a substantial rate, which is only 4x lower than that in blue spirals at fixed mass. This star formation is more obscured than in blue galaxies and its optical signatures are weak. They appear predominantly in the stellar mass range of log M*/Msol=[10,11] where they constitute over half of the star-forming galaxies in the cluster; they are thus a vital ingredient for understanding the overall picture of star formation quenching in clusters. We find that the mean specific SFR of star-forming galaxies in the cluster is clearly lower than in the field, in contrast to the specific SFR properties of blue galaxies alone, which appear similar in cluster and field. Such a rich red spiral population is best explained if quenching is a slow process and morphological transformation is delayed even more. At log M*/Msol<10, such galaxies are rare, suggesting that their quenching is fast and accompanied by morphological change. We note, that edge-on spirals play a minor role; despite being dust-reddened they form only a small fraction of spirals independent of environment.
  • We present an overview of the Space Telescope A901/2 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES). STAGES is a multiwavelength project designed to probe physical drivers of galaxy evolution across a wide range of environments and luminosity. A complex multi-cluster system at z~0.165 has been the subject of an 80-orbit F606W HST/ACS mosaic covering the full 0.5x0.5 (~5x5 Mpc^2) span of the supercluster. Extensive multiwavelength observations with XMM-Newton, GALEX, Spitzer, 2dF, GMRT, and the 17-band COMBO-17 photometric redshift survey complement the HST imaging. Our survey goals include simultaneously linking galaxy morphology with other observables such as age, star-formation rate, nuclear activity, and stellar mass. In addition, with the multiwavelength dataset and new high resolution mass maps from gravitational lensing, we are able to disentangle the large-scale structure of the system. By examining all aspects of environment we will be able to evaluate the relative importance of the dark matter halos, the local galaxy density, and the hot X-ray gas in driving galaxy transformation. This paper describes the HST imaging, data reduction, and creation of a master catalogue. We perform Sersic fitting on the HST images and conduct associated simulations to quantify completeness. In addition, we present the COMBO-17 photometric redshift catalogue and estimates of stellar masses and star-formation rates for this field. We define galaxy and cluster sample selection criteria which will be the basis for forthcoming science analyses, and present a compilation of notable objects in the field. Finally, we describe the further multiwavelength observations and announce public access to the data and catalogues.
  • We present a high resolution dark matter reconstruction of the z=0.165 Abell 901/902 supercluster from a weak lensing analysis of the HST STAGES survey. We detect the four main structures of the supercluster at high significance, resolving substructure within and between the clusters. We find that the distribution of dark matter is well traced by the cluster galaxies, with the brightest cluster galaxies marking out the strongest peaks in the dark matter distribution. We also find a significant extension of the dark matter distribution of Abell 901a in the direction of an infalling X-ray group Abell 901alpha. We present mass, mass-to-light and mass-to-stellar mass ratio measurements of the structures and substructures that we detect. We find no evidence for variation of the mass-to-light and mass-to-stellar mass ratio between the different clusters. We compare our space-based lensing analysis with an earlier ground-based lensing analysis of the supercluster to demonstrate the importance of space-based imaging for future weak lensing dark matter 'observations'.
  • A common feature of hierarchical galaxy formation models is the process of "inverse" morphological transformation: a bulge dominated galaxy accretes a gas disk, dramatically reducing the system's bulge-to-disk mass ratio. During their formation, present day galaxies may execute many such cycles across the Hubble diagram. A good candidate for such a "hermaphrodite" galaxy is NGC 3108: a dust-lane early-type galaxy which has a large amount of HI gas distributed in a large scale disk. We present narrow band H_alpha and R-band imaging, and compare the results with the HI distribution. The emission is in two components: a nuclear bar and an extended disk component which coincides with the HI distribution. This suggests that a stellar disk is currently being formed out of the HI gas. The spatial distributions of the H_alpha and HI emission and the HII regions are consistent with a barred spiral structure, extending some 20 kpc in radius. We measure an extinction- corrected SFR of 0.42 Msun/yr. The luminosity function of the HII regions is similar to other spiral galaxies, with a power law index of -2.1, suggesting that the star formation mechanism is similar to other spiral galaxies. We measured the current disk mass and find that it is too massive to have been formed by the current SFR over the last few Gyr. It is likely that the SFR in NGC 3108 was higher in the past. With the current SFR, the disk in NGC 3108 will grow to be ~6.2x10^9 Msun in stellar mass within the next 5.5 Gyr. While this is substantial, the disk will be insignificant compared with the large bulge mass: the final stellar mass disk-to-bulge ratio will be ~0.02. NGC 3108 will fail to transform into anything resembling a spiral without a boost in the SFR and additional supply of gas.
  • In McCarthy et al. (2007, astro-ph/0701335) we present an analysis of entropy generation during cluster mergers, using SPH simulations. This conference proceeding contribution summarizes some of the most important findings of that paper, without all the technical details. Our main result is that during cluster mergers, entropy is generated in two major shock episodes, that heat the gas from the inside-out, in a way that distributes most of the energy within the more massive clump. This is different from the "onion-skin" model adopted in many simple analytic models of cluster formation.
  • In this paper we present the three dimensional dynamics of the galaxy SDSS J101345.39+011613.66, selected for its unusually strong Balmer absorption lines (Wo(H-delta)=7.5A). Using the GMOS-South IFU in Nod & Shuffle mode we have mapped the continuum and optical absorption lines of this z=0.1055 field galaxy. This galaxy has a disturbed morphology, with a halo of diffuse material distributed asymmetrically toward the north. Using the [OII] emission line (Wo([OII])=4.1A) we find that the gas and hot OB stars are offset from the older stars in the system. The gas also has a spatially extended and elongated morphology with a velocity gradient of 100+/-20km/s across 6kpc in projection. Using the strong H-gamma and H-delta absorption lines we find that the A- stars are widely distributed across the system and are not centrally concentrated arguing that the A-star population has formed in molecular clouds outside the nucleus. By cross correlating the spectra from the datacube with an A-star template we find evidence that the A-star population has a 40km/s shear in the same direction as the gas. The disturbed morphology, strong colour gradients and strong H-delta and H-gamma absorption lines in SDSS J101345.39 argue that this is a recent tidal interaction/merger between a passive elliptical and star-forming galaxy. Although based on a single object, these results show that we can spatially resolve and constrain the dynamics of this short lived (yet important) phase of galaxy formation in which the evolutionary process take galaxies from star-forming to their quiescent end products.
  • We derive the fraction of blue galaxies in a sample of clusters at z < 0.11 and the general field at the same redshift. The value of the blue fraction is observed to depend on the luminosity limit adopted, cluster-centric radius and, more generally, local galaxy density, but it does not depend on cluster properties. Changes in the blue fraction are due to variations in the relative proportions of red and blue galaxies but the star formation rate for these two galaxy groups remains unchanged. Our results are most consistent with a model where the star formation rate declines rapidly and the blue galaxies tend to be dwarfs and do not favour mechanisms where the Butcher-Oemler effect is caused by processes specific to the cluster environment.
  • We analyse the observed correlation between galaxy environment and H-alpha emission line strength, using volume-limited samples and group catalogues of 24968 galaxies drawn from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (Mb<-19.5) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Mr<-20.6). We characterise the environment by 1) Sigma_5, the surface number density of galaxies determined by the projected distance to the 5th nearest neighbour; and 2) rho1.1 and rho5.5, three-dimensional density estimates obtained by convolving the galaxy distribution with Gaussian kernels of dispersion 1.1 Mpc and 5.5 Mpc, respectively. We find that star-forming and quiescent galaxies form two distinct populations, as characterised by their H-alpha equivalent width, EW(Ha). The relative numbers of star-forming and quiescent galaxies varies strongly and continuously with local density. However, the distribution of EW(Ha) amongst the star-forming population is independent of environment. The fraction of star-forming galaxies shows strong sensitivity to the density on large scales, rho5.5, which is likely independent of the trend with local density, rho1.1. We use two differently-selected group catalogues to demonstrate that the correlation with galaxy density is approximately independent of group velocity dispersion, for sigma=200-1000 km/s. Even in the lowest density environments, no more than ~70 per cent of galaxies show significant H-alpha emission. Based on these results, we conclude that the present-day correlation between star formation rate and environment is a result of short-timescale mechanisms that take place preferentially at high redshift, such as starbursts induced by galaxy-galaxy interactions.
  • (Abridged) We present in this paper a detailed analysis of the effect of environment on the star-formation activity of galaxies within the EDR of the SDSS. We have used the Halpha emission line to derive the star-formation rate (SFR) for each galaxy within a volume-limited sample of 8598 galaxies with 0.05 < z < 0.095 and M(r)<= -20.45. We find that the SFR of galaxies is strongly correlated with the local (projected) galaxy density and thus we present here the density-SFR relation that is analogous to the density-morphology relation. The effect of density on the SFR of galaxies is seen in three ways. First, the overall distribution of SFRs is shifted to lower values in dense environments compared with the field population. Second, the effect is most noticeable for the strongly star-forming galaxies in the 75th percentile of the SFR distribution. Third, there is a ``break'' (or characteristic density) in the density-SFR relation at a local galaxy density of 1h-2 Mpc-2. To understand this break further, we have studied the SFR of galaxies as a function of clustercentric radius from 17 clusters and groups objectively selected from the SDSS EDR data. The distribution of SFRs of cluster galaxies begins to change, compared with the field population, at a clustercentric radius of 3-4 virial radii, which is consistent with the characteristic break in density that we observe in the density-SFR relation. Our tests suggest that the density-morphology relation alone is unlikely to explain the density-SFR relation we observe. Taken all together, these works demonstrate that the decrease in SFR of galaxies in dense environments is a universal phenomenon over a wide range in density (from 0.08 to 10h-2 Mpc-2) and redshift (out to z = 0.5).
  • We have measured the equivalent width of the H-alpha emission line for 11006 galaxies brighter than M_b=-19 (LCDM) at 0.05<z<0.1 in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dF), in the fields of seventeen known galaxy clusters. The limited redshift range ensures that our results are insensitive to aperture bias, and to residuals from night sky emission lines. We use these measurements to trace mustar, the star formation rate normalized to Lstar, as a function of distance from the cluster centre, and local projected galaxy density. We find that the distribution of mustar steadily skews toward larger values with increasing distance from the cluster centre, converging to the field distribution at distances greater than ~3 times the virial radius. A correlation between star formation rate and local projected density is also found, which is independent of cluster velocity dispersion and disappears at projected densities below ~1 galaxy (brighter than M_b=-19) per Mpc^2. This characteristic scale corresponds approximately to the mean density at the cluster virial radius. The same correlation holds for galaxies more than two virial radii from the cluster centre. We conclude that environmental influences on galaxy properties are not restricted to cluster cores, but are effective in all groups where the density exceeds this critical value. The present day abundance of such systems, and the strong evolution of this abundance, makes it likely that hierarchical growth of structure plays a significant role in decreasing the global average star formation rate. Finally, the low star formation rates well beyond the virialised cluster rule out severe physical processes, such as ram pressure stripping of disk gas, as being completely responsible for the variations in galaxy properties with environment.
  • (Abridged) We present results of an H-alpha survey in the rich cluster A1689 at z=0.18, using the LDSS++ spectrograph on the AAT. We obtained spectra covering redshifted H-alpha for 522 galaxies brighter than I=22.5, covering a field of 8.7'X8.7'. We detect H-alpha emission in 46 of these galaxies; accounting for selection effects due to sampling and cluster membership, we determine that 24% of cluster members brighter than M_R=-16.5+5log(h) are detected with H-alpha flux greater than 4h^{-2}X 10^{38} ergs/s. This corresponds to a limiting star formation rate of 0.008 h^{-2} Msun/yr, assuming 1 magnitude of dust extinction. From a Hubble Space Telescope mosaic covering 7.5' X 10.0', we determine morphologies for 199 galaxies brighter than I=21, and find that 20% of the cluster members are of type Sa or later. More than 90% of cluster spirals show H-alpha emission, compared with less than 10% of E and S0 galaxies. The cluster H-alpha luminosity function has a low normalisation relative to the z~0.2 field, by ~50%, after accounting for the different fraction of spiral galaxies in the two environments. When compared with local field galaxies, this suggests that star formation activity is suppressed in early-type cluster galaxies, relative to their field counterparts. Our sample includes 29 galaxies previously observed with ISOCAM at 6 and 15 microns. We detect all 15-micron sources at H-alpha, so there is no evidence for any star formation completely hidden at H-alpha. Comparing the 15-micron and H-alpha fluxes, we find evidence that some mid-infrared-detected galaxies could be obscured by as much as 3 magnitudes of extinction at H-alpha, although this depends on the largely unknown contribution from any AGN-heated dust to the mid-infrared flux.
  • (Abridged) We present a morphological analysis of 17 X-ray selected clusters at z~0.25, imaged uniformly with HST WFPC2. Eight of these clusters have low X-ray luminosities (<10^{44} erg/s), while the remaining nine clusters have L_x>10^{45} ergs/s. The clusters cover a relatively small range in redshift and the data are homogeneous in terms of depth, resolution and rest wavelength observed. We use GIM2D to fit the two dimensional surface brightness profiles of galaxies down to M(702)<=-18.2 (Ho=50; roughly 0.01 L*) with parametric models, and quantify their morphologies using the fractional bulge luminosity (B/T). Within a single WFPC2 image we find that the Low-Lx clusters are dominated by galaxies with low B/T (~0), while the High-Lx clusters are dominated by galaxies with intermediate B/T (~0.4). We test whether this difference could arise from a universal morphology-density relation due to differences in the typical galaxy densities in the two samples. We find that small differences in the B/T distributions of the two samples persist with marginal statistical significance even when we restrict the comparison to galaxies in environments with similar projected local galaxy densities. From the correlations with the bulge and disk luminosity functions, we argue that the global environment affects the population of bulges, over and above trends seen with local density. We conclude that the destruction of disks through ram pressure stripping or harassment is not solely responsible for the morphology-density relation, and that bulge formation is less efficient in low mass clusters.
  • Recent measurements of the K-band luminosity function now provide us with strong, reliable constraints on the fraction of baryons which have cooled. Globally, this fraction is only about 5%, and there is no strong evidence that it is significantly higher in clusters. Without an effective sub-grid feedback prescription, the cooled gas fraction in any numerical simulation exceeds these observational constraints, and increases with increasing resolution. This compromises any discussion of galaxy and cluster properties based on results of simulations which include cooling but do not implement an effective feedback mechanism.