• The Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) project explores feedback in cosmological galaxy formation simulations. Previous FIRE simulations used an identical source code (FIRE-1) for consistency. Motivated by the development of more accurate numerics - including hydrodynamic solvers, gravitational softening, and supernova coupling algorithms - and exploration of new physics (e.g. magnetic fields), we introduce FIRE-2, an updated numerical implementation of FIRE physics for the GIZMO code. We run a suite of simulations and compare against FIRE-1: overall, FIRE-2 improvements do not qualitatively change galaxy-scale properties. We pursue an extensive study of numerics versus physics. Details of the star-formation algorithm, cooling physics, and chemistry have weak effects, provided that we include metal-line cooling and star formation occurs at higher-than-mean densities. We present new resolution criteria for high-resolution galaxy simulations. Most galaxy-scale properties are robust to numerics we test, provided: (1) Toomre masses are resolved; (2) feedback coupling ensures conservation, and (3) individual supernovae are time-resolved. Stellar masses and profiles are most robust to resolution, followed by metal abundances and morphologies, followed by properties of winds and circum-galactic media (CGM). Central (~kpc) mass concentrations in massive (L*) galaxies are sensitive to numerics (via trapping/recycling of winds in hot halos). Multiple feedback mechanisms play key roles: supernovae regulate stellar masses/winds; stellar mass-loss fuels late star formation; radiative feedback suppresses accretion onto dwarfs and instantaneous star formation in disks. We provide all initial conditions and numerical algorithms used.
  • Young massive star clusters spanning $\sim 10^4 - 10^8 M_\odot$ in mass have been observed to have similar surface brightness profiles. Recent hydrodynamical simulations of star cluster formation have also produced star clusters with this structure. We argue analytically that this type of mass distribution arises naturally in the relaxation from a hierarchically-clustered distribution of stars into a monolithic star cluster through hierarchical merging. We show that arbitrary initial profiles will tend to converge to a universal profile under hierarchical merging, owing to phase-space mixing obeying certain conservation constraints. We perform $N$-body simulations of a pairwise merger of model star clusters and find that mergers readily produce the shallow surface brightness profiles observed in young massive clusters. Finally, we simulate the relaxation of a hierarchically-clustered mass distribution constructed from an idealized fragmentation model. Assuming only power-law spatial and kinematic scaling relations, these numerical experiments are able to reproduce the surface density profiles of observed young massive star clusters. Thus we provide physical motivation for the structure of young massive clusters within the paradigm of hierarchical star formation. This has important implications for the structure of nascent globular clusters.
  • We use a semi-analytic model for globular cluster (GC) formation built on dark matter merger trees to explore the relative role of formation physics and hierarchical assembly in determining the properties of GC populations. Many previous works have argued that the observed linear relation between total GC mass and halo mass points to a fundamental GC -- dark matter connection or indicates that GCs formed at very high redshift before feedback processes introduced nonlinearity in the baryon-to-dark matter mass relation. We demonstrate that at $M_{\rm vir}(z=0) \gtrsim 10^{11.5} M_{\odot}$, a constant ratio between halo mass and total GC mass is in fact an almost inevitable consequence of hierarchical assembly: by the central limit theorem, it is expected at $z=0$ independent of the GC-to-halo mass relation at the time of GC formation. The GC-to-halo mass relation at $M_{\rm vir}(z=0) < 10^{11.5} M_{\odot}$ is more sensitive to the details of the GC formation process. In our fiducial model, GC formation occurs in galaxies when the gas surface density exceeds a critical value. This model naturally predicts bimodal GC color distributions similar to those observed in nearby galaxies and reproduces the observed relation between GC system metallicity and halo mass. It predicts that the cosmic GC formation rate peaked at $z$ $\sim$ 4, too late for GCs to contribute significantly to the UV luminosity density during reionization.
  • In the local Universe, there is a strong division in the star-forming properties of low-mass galaxies, with star formation largely ubiquitous amongst the field population while satellite systems are predominantly quenched. This dichotomy implies that environmental processes play the dominant role in suppressing star formation within this low-mass regime (${M}_{\star} \sim 10^{5.5-8}~{\rm M}_{\odot}$). As shown by observations of the Local Volume, however, there is a non-negligible population of passive systems in the field, which challenges our understanding of quenching at low masses. By applying the satellite quenching models of Fillingham et al. (2015) to subhalo populations in the Exploring the Local Volume In Simulations (ELVIS) suite, we investigate the role of environmental processes in quenching star formation within the nearby field. Using model parameters that reproduce the satellite quenched fraction in the Local Group, we predict a quenched fraction -- due solely to environmental effects -- of $\sim 0.52 \pm 0.26$ within $1< R/R_{\rm vir} < 2$ of the Milky Way and M31. This is in good agreement with current observations of the Local Volume and suggests that the majority of the passive field systems observed at these distances are quenched via environmental mechanisms. Beyond $2~R_{\rm vir}$, however, dwarf galaxy quenching becomes difficult to explain through an interaction with either the Milky Way or M31, such that more isolated, field dwarfs may be self-quenched as a result of star-formation feedback.
  • The oldest stars in the Milky Way (MW) bear imprints of the Galaxy's early assembly history. We use FIRE cosmological zoom-in simulations of three MW-mass disk galaxies to study the spatial distribution, chemistry, and kinematics of the oldest surviving stars ($z_{\rm form} \gtrsim 5$) in MW-like galaxies. We predict the oldest stars to be less centrally concentrated at $z=0$ than stars formed at later times as a result of two processes. First, the majority of the oldest stars are not formed $\textit{in situ}$ but are accreted during hierarchical assembly. These $\textit{ex situ}$ stars are deposited on dispersion-supported, halo-like orbits but dominate over old stars formed $\textit{in situ}$ in the solar neighborhood, and in some simulations, even in the galactic center. Secondly, old stars formed $\textit{in situ}$ are driven outwards by bursty star formation and energetic feedback processes that create a time-varying gravitational potential at $z\gtrsim 2$, similar to the process that creates dark matter cores and expands stellar orbits in bursty dwarf galaxies. The total fraction of stars that are ancient is more than an order of magnitude higher for sight lines $\textit{away}$ from the bulge and inner halo than for inward-looking sight lines. Although the task of identifying specific stars as ancient remains challenging, we anticipate that million-star spectral surveys and photometric surveys targeting metal-poor stars already include hundreds of stars formed before $z=5$. We predict most of these targets to have higher metallicity ($-3 < \rm [Fe/H] < -2$) than the most extreme metal-poor stars.
  • We present a suite of cosmological zoom-in simulations at z>5 from the Feedback In Realistic Environments project, spanning a halo mass range M_halo~10^8-10^12 M_sun at z=5. We predict the stellar mass-halo mass relation, stellar mass function, and luminosity function in several bands from z=5-12. The median stellar mass-halo mass relation does not evolve strongly at z=5-12. The faint-end slope of the luminosity function steepens with increasing redshift, as inherited from the halo mass function at these redshifts. Below z~6, the stellar mass function and ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function slightly flatten below M_star~10^4.5 M_sun (fainter than M_1500~-12), owing to the fact that star formation in low-mass halos is suppressed by the ionizing background by the end of reionization. Such flattening does not appear at higher redshifts. We provide redshift-dependent fitting functions for the SFR-M_halo, SFR-M_star, and broad-band magnitude-stellar mass relations. We derive the star formation rate density and stellar mass density at z=5-12 and show that the contribution from very faint galaxies becomes more important at z>8. Furthermore, we find that the decline in the z~6 UV luminosity function brighter than M_1500~-20 is largely due to dust attenuation. Approximately 37% (54%) of the UV luminosity from galaxies brighter than M_1500=-13 (-17) is obscured by dust at z~6. Our results broadly agree with current data and can be tested by future observations.
  • We study the impact of a warm dark matter (WDM) cosmology on dwarf galaxy formation through a suite of cosmological hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations of $M_{\rm halo} \approx10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$ dark matter halos as part of the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. A main focus of this paper is to evaluate the combined effects of dark matter physics and stellar feedback on the well-known small-scale issues found in cold dark matter (CDM) models. We find that the $z=0$ stellar mass of a galaxy is strongly correlated with the central density of its host dark matter halo at the time of formation, $z_{\rm f}$, in both CDM and WDM models. WDM halos follow the same $M_{\star}(z=0)-V_{\rm max}(z_{\rm f})$ relation as in CDM, but they form later, are less centrally dense, and therefore contain galaxies that are less massive than their CDM counterparts. As a result, the impact of baryonic effects on the central gravitational potential is typically diminished relative to CDM. However, the combination of delayed formation in WDM and energy input from stellar feedback results in dark matter profiles with lower overall densities. The WDM galaxies studied here have a wider diversity of star formation histories (SFHs) than the same systems simulated in CDM, and the two lowest $M_{\star}$ WDM galaxies form all of their stars at late times. The discovery of young ultra-faint dwarf galaxies with no ancient star formation -- which do not exist in our CDM simulations -- would therefore provide evidence in support of WDM.
  • The shape of a galaxy's spatially unresolved, globally integrated 21-cm emission line depends on its internal gas kinematics: galaxies with rotation-supported gas disks produce double-horned profiles with steep wings, while galaxies with dispersion-supported gas produce Gaussian-like profiles with sloped wings. Using mock observations of simulated galaxies from the FIRE project, we show that one can therefore constrain a galaxy's gas kinematics from its unresolved 21-cm line profile. In particular, we find that the kurtosis of the 21-cm line increases with decreasing $V/\sigma$, and that this trend is robust across a wide range of masses, signal-to-noise ratios, and inclinations. We then quantify the shapes of 21-cm line profiles from a morphologically unbiased sample of $\sim$2000 low-redshift, HI-detected galaxies with $M_{\rm star} = 10^{7-11} M_{\odot}$ and compare to the simulated galaxies. At $M_{\rm star} \gtrsim 10^{10} M_{\odot}$, both the observed and simulated galaxies produce double-horned profiles with low kurtosis and steep wings, consistent with rotation-supported disks. Both the observed and simulated line profiles become more Gaussian-like (higher kurtosis and less-steep wings) at lower masses, indicating increased dispersion support. However, the simulated galaxies transition from rotation to dispersion support more strongly: at $M_{\rm star} = 10^{8-10}M_{\odot}$, most of the simulations produce more Gaussian-like profiles than typical observed galaxies with similar mass, indicating that gas in the low-mass simulated galaxies is, on average, overly dispersion-supported. Most of the lower-mass simulated galaxies also have somewhat lower gas fractions than the median of the observed population. The simulations nevertheless reproduce the observed line-width baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, which is insensitive to rotation vs. dispersion support.
  • We present the reconstructed evolution of rest-frame ultra-violet (UV) luminosities of the most massive Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxy, Fornax, and its five globular clusters (GCs) across redshift, based on analysis of the stellar fossil record and stellar population synthesis modeling. We find that (1) Fornax's (proto-)GCs can generate $10-100$ times more UV flux than the field population, despite comprising $<\sim 5\%$ of the stellar mass at the relevant redshifts; (2) due to their respective surface brightnesses, it is more likely that faint, compact sources in the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFFs) are GCs hosted by faint galaxies, than faint galaxies themselves. This may significantly complicate the construction of a galaxy UV luminosity function at $z>3$. (3) GC formation can introduce order-of-magnitude errors in abundance matching. We also find that some compact HFF objects are consistent with the reconstructed properties of Fornax's GCs at the same redshifts (e.g., surface brightness, star formation rate), suggesting we may already have detected proto-GCs in the early Universe. Finally, we discuss the prospects for improving the connections between local GCs and proto-GCs detected in the early Universe.
  • We study the morphologies and sizes of galaxies at z>5 using high-resolution cosmological zoom-in simulations from the Feedback In Realistic Environments project. The galaxies show a variety of morphologies, from compact to clumpy to irregular. The simulated galaxies have more extended morphologies and larger sizes when measured using rest-frame optical B-band light than rest-frame UV light; sizes measured from stellar mass surface density are even larger. The UV morphologies are usually dominated by several small, bright young stellar clumps that are not always associated with significant stellar mass. The B-band light traces stellar mass better than the UV, but it can also be biased by the bright clumps. At all redshifts, galaxy size correlates with stellar mass/luminosity with large scatter. The half-light radii range from 0.01 to 0.2 arcsec (0.05-1 kpc physical) at fixed magnitude. At z>5, the size of galaxies at fixed stellar mass/luminosity evolves as (1+z)^{-m}, with m~1-2. For galaxies less massive than M_star~10^8 M_sun, the ratio of the half-mass radius to the halo virial radius is ~10% and does not evolve significantly at z=5-10; this ratio is typically 1-5% for more massive galaxies. A galaxy's "observed" size decreases dramatically at shallower surface brightness limits. This effect may account for the extremely small sizes of z>5 galaxies measured in the Hubble Frontier Fields. We provide predictions for the cumulative light distribution as a function of surface brightness for typical galaxies at z=6.
  • We investigate the merger histories of isolated dwarf galaxies based on a suite of 15 high-resolution cosmological zoom-in simulations, all with masses of $M_{\rm halo} \approx 10^{10}\,{\rm M}_{\odot}$ (and M$_\star\sim10^5-10^7\,{\rm M}_{\odot}$) at $z=0$, from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. The stellar populations of these dwarf galaxies at $z=0$ are formed essentially entirely "in situ": over 90$\%$ of the stellar mass is formed in the main progenitor in all but two cases, and all 15 of the galaxies have >70$\%$ of their stellar mass formed in situ. Virtually all galaxy mergers occur prior to $z\sim3$, meaning that accreted stellar populations are ancient. On average, our simulated dwarfs undergo 5 galaxy mergers in their lifetimes, with typical pre-merger galaxy mass ratios that are less than 1:10. This merger frequency is generally comparable to what has been found in dissipationless simulations when coupled with abundance matching. Two of the simulated dwarfs have a luminous satellite companion at $z=0$. These ultra-faint dwarfs lie at or below current detectability thresholds but are intriguing targets for next-generation facilities. The small contribution of accreted stars make it extremely difficult to discern the effects of mergers in the vast majority of dwarfs either photometrically or using resolved-star color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). The important implication for near-field cosmology is that star formation histories of comparably massive galaxies derived from resolved CMDs should trace the build-up of stellar mass in one main system across cosmic time as opposed to reflecting the contributions of many individual star formation histories of merged dwarfs.
  • We present a suite of 15 cosmological zoom-in simulations of isolated dark matter halos, all with masses of $M_{\rm halo} \approx 10^{10}\,{\rm M}_\odot$ at $z=0$, in order to understand the relationship between halo assembly, galaxy formation, and feedback's effects on the central density structure in dwarf galaxies. These simulations are part of the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project and are performed at extremely high resolution. The resultant galaxies have stellar masses that are consistent with rough abundance matching estimates, coinciding with the faintest galaxies that can be seen beyond the virial radius of the Milky Way ($M_\star/{\rm M}_\odot\approx 10^5-10^7$). This non-negligible spread in stellar mass at $z=0$ in halos within a narrow range of virial masses is strongly correlated with central halo density or maximum circular velocity $V_{\rm max}$. Much of this dependence of $M_\star$ on a second parameter (beyond $M_{\rm halo}$) is a direct consequence of the $M_{\rm halo}\sim10^{10}\,{\rm M}_\odot$ mass scale coinciding with the threshold for strong reionization suppression: the densest, earliest-forming halos remain above the UV-suppression scale throughout their histories while late-forming systems fall below the UV-suppression scale over longer periods and form fewer stars as a result. In fact, the latest-forming, lowest-concentration halo in our suite fails to form any stars. Halos that form galaxies with $M_\star\gtrsim2\times10^{6}\,{\rm M}_\odot$ have reduced central densities relative to dark-matter-only simulations, and the radial extent of the density modifications is well-approximated by the galaxy half-mass radius $r_{1/2}$. This apparent stellar mass threshold of $M_\star \approx 2\times 10^{6} \approx 2\times 10^{-4} \,M_{\rm halo}$ is broadly consistent with previous work and provides a testable prediction of FIRE feedback models in LCDM.
  • I present a simple phenomenological model for the observed linear scaling of the stellar mass in old globular clusters (GCs) with $z=0$ halo mass in which the stellar mass in GCs scales linearly with progenitor halo mass at $z=6$ above a minimum halo mass for GC formation. This model reproduces the observed $M_{\rm GCs}-M_{\rm halo}$ relation at $z=0$ and results in a prediction for the minimum halo mass at $z=6$ required for hosting one GC: $M_{\rm min}(z=6)=1.07 \times 10^9\,M_{\odot}$. Translated to $z=0$, the mean threshold mass is $M_{\rm halo}(z=0) \approx 2\times 10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$. I explore the observability of GCs in the reionization era and their contribution to cosmic reionization, both of which depend sensitively on the (unknown) ratio of GC birth mass to present-day stellar mass, $\xi$. Based on current detections of $z \gtrsim 6$ objects with $M_{1500} < -17$, values of $\xi > 10$ are strongly disfavored; this, in turn, has potentially important implications for GC formation scenarios. Even for low values of $\xi$, some observed high-$z$ galaxies may actually be GCs, complicating estimates of reionization-era galaxy ultraviolet luminosity functions and constraints on dark matter models. GCs are likely important reionization sources if $5 \lesssim \xi \lesssim 10$. I also explore predictions for the fraction of accreted versus in situ GCs in the local Universe and for descendants of systems at the halo mass threshold of GC formation (dwarf galaxies). An appealing feature of the model presented here is the ability to make predictions for GC properties based solely on dark matter halo merger trees.
  • We study the z=0 gas kinematics, morphology, and angular momentum content of isolated galaxies in a suite of cosmological zoom-in simulations from the FIRE project spanning $M_{\star}=10^{6-11}M_{\odot}$. Gas becomes increasingly rotationally supported with increasing galaxy mass. In the lowest-mass galaxies ($M_{\star}<10^{8}M_{\odot}$), gas fails to form a morphological disk and is primarily dispersion and pressure supported. At intermediate masses ($M_{\star}=10^{8-10}M_{\odot}$), galaxies display a wide range of gas kinematics and morphologies, from thin, rotating disks, to irregular spheroids with negligible net rotation. All the high-mass ($M_{\star}=10^{10-11}M_{\odot}$) galaxies form rotationally supported gas disks. Many of the halos whose galaxies fail to form disks harbor high angular momentum gas in their circumgalactic medium. The ratio of the specific angular momentum of gas in the central galaxy to that of the dark-matter halo increases significantly with galaxy mass, from $j_{\rm gas}/j_{\rm DM}\sim0.1$ at $M_{\star}=10^{6-7}M_{\odot}$ to $j_{\rm gas}/j_{\rm DM}\sim2$ at $M_{\star}=10^{10-11}M_{\odot}$. The reduced rotational support in the lowest-mass galaxies owes to (a) stellar feedback and the UV background suppressing the accretion of high-angular momentum gas at late times, and (b) stellar feedback driving large non-circular gas motions. We broadly reproduce the observed scaling relations between galaxy mass, gas rotation velocity, size, and angular momentum, but may somewhat underpredict the incidence of disky, high-angular momentum galaxies at the lowest observed masses ($M_{\star}=(10^{6}-2\times10^{7})M_{\odot}$). In our simulations, stars are uniformly less rotationally supported than gas. The common assumption that stars follow the same rotation curve as gas thus substantially overestimates galaxies' stellar angular momentum, particularly at low masses.
  • Dwarf galaxies are known to have remarkably low star formation efficiency due to strong feedback. Adopting the dwarf galaxies of the Milky Way as a laboratory, we explore a flexible semi-analytic galaxy formation model to understand how the feedback processes shape the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. Using Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo, we exhaustively search a large parameter space of the model and rigorously show that the general wisdom of strong outflows as the primary feedback mechanism cannot simultaneously explain the stellar mass function and the mass--metallicity relation of the Milky Way satellites. An extended model that assumes that a fraction of baryons is prevented from collapsing into low-mass halos in the first place can be accurately constrained to simultaneously reproduce those observations. The inference suggests that two different physical mechanisms are needed to explain the two different data sets. In particular, moderate outflows with weak halo mass dependence are needed to explain the mass--metallicity relation, and prevention of baryons falling into shallow gravitational potentials of low-mass halos (e.g. "pre-heating") is needed to explain the low stellar mass fraction for a given subhalo mass.
  • Among the most important goals in cosmology is detecting and quantifying small ($M_{\rm halo}\simeq10^{6-9}~\mathrm{M}_\odot$) dark matter (DM) subhalos. Current probes around the Milky Way (MW) are most sensitive to such substructure within $\sim20$ kpc of the halo center, where the galaxy contributes significantly to the potential. We explore the effects of baryons on subhalo populations in $\Lambda$CDM using cosmological zoom-in baryonic simulations of MW-mass halos from the Latte simulation suite, part of the Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. Specifically, we compare simulations of the same two halos run using (1) DM-only (DMO), (2) full baryonic physics, and (3) DM with an embedded disk potential grown to match the FIRE simulation. Relative to baryonic simulations, DMO simulations contain $\sim2\times$ as many subhalos within 100 kpc of the halo center; this excess is $\gtrsim5\times$ within 25 kpc. At $z=0$, the baryonic simulations are completely devoid of subhalos down to $3\times10^6~\mathrm{M}_\odot$ within $15$ kpc of the MW-mass galaxy, and fewer than 20 surviving subhalos have orbital pericenters <20 kpc. Despite the complexities of baryonic physics, the simple addition of an embedded central disk potential to DMO simulations reproduces this subhalo depletion, including trends with radius, remarkably well. Thus, the additional tidal field from the central galaxy is the primary cause of subhalo depletion. Subhalos on radial orbits that pass close to the central galaxy are preferentially destroyed, causing the surviving subhalo population to have tangentially biased orbits compared to DMO predictions. Our method of embedding a disk potential in DMO simulations provides a fast and accurate alternative to full baryonic simulations, thus enabling suites of cosmological simulations that can provide accurate and statistical predictions of substructure populations.
  • The Theia Collaboration: Celine Boehm, Alberto Krone-Martins, Antonio Amorim, Guillem Anglada-Escude, Alexis Brandeker, Frederic Courbin, Torsten Ensslin, Antonio Falcao, Katherine Freese, Berry Holl, Lucas Labadie, Alain Leger, Fabien Malbet, Gary Mamon, Barbara McArthur, Alcione Mora, Michael Shao, Alessandro Sozzetti, Douglas Spolyar, Eva Villaver, Conrado Albertus, Stefano Bertone, Herve Bouy, Michael Boylan-Kolchin, Anthony Brown, Warren Brown, Vitor Cardoso, Laurent Chemin, Riccardo Claudi, Alexandre C. M. Correia, Mariateresa Crosta, Antoine Crouzier, Francis-Yan Cyr-Racine, Mario Damasso, Antonio da Silva, Melvyn Davies, Payel Das, Pratika Dayal, Miguel de Val-Borro, Antonaldo Diaferio, Adrienne Erickcek, Malcolm Fairbairn, Morgane Fortin, Malcolm Fridlund, Paulo Garcia, Oleg Gnedin, Ariel Goobar, Paulo Gordo, Renaud Goullioud, Nigel Hambly, Nathan Hara, David Hobbs, Erik Hog, Andrew Holland, Rodrigo Ibata, Carme Jordi, Sergei Klioner, Sergei Kopeikin, Thomas Lacroix, Jacques Laskar, Christophe Le Poncin-Lafitte, Xavier Luri, Subhabrata Majumdar, Valeri Makarov, Richard Massey, Bertrand Mennesson, Daniel Michalik, Andre Moitinho de Almeida, Ana Mourao, Leonidas Moustakas, Neil Murray, Matthew Muterspaugh, Micaela Oertel, Luisa Ostorero, Angeles Perez-Garcia, Imants Platais, Jordi Portell i de Mora, Andreas Quirrenbach, Lisa Randall, Justin Read, Eniko Regos, Barnes Rory, Krzysztof Rybicki, Pat Scott, Jean Schneider, Jakub Scholtz, Arnaud Siebert, Ismael Tereno, John Tomsick, Wesley Traub, Monica Valluri, Matt Walker, Nicholas Walton, Laura Watkins, Glenn White, Dafydd Wyn Evans, Lukasz Wyrzykowski, Rosemary Wyse
    July 2, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    In the context of the ESA M5 (medium mission) call we proposed a new satellite mission, Theia, based on relative astrometry and extreme precision to study the motion of very faint objects in the Universe. Theia is primarily designed to study the local dark matter properties, the existence of Earth-like exoplanets in our nearest star systems and the physics of compact objects. Furthermore, about 15 $\%$ of the mission time was dedicated to an open observatory for the wider community to propose complementary science cases. With its unique metrology system and "point and stare" strategy, Theia's precision would have reached the sub micro-arcsecond level. This is about 1000 times better than ESA/Gaia's accuracy for the brightest objects and represents a factor 10-30 improvement for the faintest stars (depending on the exact observational program). In the version submitted to ESA, we proposed an optical (350-1000nm) on-axis TMA telescope. Due to ESA Technology readiness level, the camera's focal plane would have been made of CCD detectors but we anticipated an upgrade with CMOS detectors. Photometric measurements would have been performed during slew time and stabilisation phases needed for reaching the required astrometric precision.
  • We compare a suite of four simulated dwarf galaxies formed in 10$^{10} M_{\odot}$ haloes of collisionless Cold Dark Matter (CDM) with galaxies simulated in the same haloes with an identical galaxy formation model but a non-zero cross-section for dark matter self-interactions. These cosmological zoom-in simulations are part of the Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) project and utilize the FIRE-2 model for hydrodynamics and galaxy formation physics. We find the stellar masses of the galaxies formed in Self-Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) with $\sigma/m= 1\, cm^2/g$ are very similar to those in CDM (spanning $M_{\star} \approx 10^{5.7 - 7.0} M_{\odot}$) and all runs lie on a similar stellar mass -- size relation. The logarithmic dark matter density slope ($\alpha=d\log \rho / d\log r$) in the central $250-500$ pc remains steeper than $\alpha= -0.8$ for the CDM-Hydro simulations with stellar mass $M_{\star} \sim 10^{6.6} M_{\odot}$ and core-like in the most massive galaxy. In contrast, every SIDM hydrodynamic simulation yields a flatter profile, with $\alpha >-0.4$. Moreover, the central density profiles predicted in SIDM runs without baryons are similar to the SIDM runs that include FIRE-2 baryonic physics. Thus, SIDM appears to be much more robust to the inclusion of (potentially uncertain) baryonic physics than CDM on this mass scale, suggesting SIDM will be easier to falsify than CDM using low-mass galaxies. Our FIRE simulations predict that galaxies less massive than $M_{\star} < 3 \times 10^6 M_{\odot}$ provide potentially ideal targets for discriminating models, with SIDM producing substantial cores in such tiny galaxies and CDM producing cusps.
  • We use a suite of high-resolution cosmological dwarf galaxy simulations to test the accuracy of commonly-used mass estimators from Walker et al.(2009) and Wolf et al.(2010), both of which depend on the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion and the 2D half-light radius of the galaxy, $Re$. The simulations are part of the the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project and include twelve systems with stellar masses spanning $10^{5} - 10^{7} M_{\odot}$ that have structural and kinematic properties similar to those of observed dispersion-supported dwarfs. Both estimators are found to be quite accurate: $M_{Wolf}/M_{true} = 0.98^{+0.19}_{-0.12}$ and $M_{Walker}/M_{true} =1.07^{+0.21}_{-0.15}$, with errors reflecting the 68% range over all simulations. The excellent performance of these estimators is remarkable given that they each assume spherical symmetry, a supposition that is broken in our simulated galaxies. Though our dwarfs have negligible rotation support, their 3D stellar distributions are flattened, with short-to-long axis ratios $ c/a \simeq 0.4-0.7$. The accuracy of the estimators shows no trend with asphericity. Our simulated galaxies have sphericalized stellar profiles in 3D that follow a nearly universal form, one that transitions from a core at small radius to a steep fall-off $\propto r^{-4.2}$ at large $r$, they are well fit by S\'ersic profiles in projection. We find that the most important empirical quantity affecting mass estimator accuracy is $Re$ . Determining $Re$ by an analytic fit to the surface density profile produces a better estimated mass than if the half-light radius is determined via direct summation.
  • We present a proper motion measurement for the halo globular cluster Pyxis, using HST/ACS data as the first epoch, and GeMS/GSAOI Adaptive Optics data as the second, separated by a baseline of about 5 years. This is both the first measurement of the proper motion of Pyxis and the first calibration and use of Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics data to measure an absolute proper motion for a faint, distant halo object. Consequently, we present our analysis of the Adaptive Optics data in detail. We obtain a proper motion of mu_alpha cos(delta)=1.09+/-0.31 mas/yr and mu_delta=0.68+/-0.29 mas/yr. From the proper motion and the line-of-sight velocity we find the orbit of Pyxis is rather eccentric with its apocenter at more than 100 kpc and its pericenter at about 30 kpc. We also investigate two literature-proposed associations for Pyxis with the recently discovered ATLAS stream and the Magellanic system. Combining our measurements with dynamical modeling and cosmological numerical simulations we find it unlikely Pyxis is associated with either system. We examine other Milky Way satellites for possible association using the orbit, eccentricity, metallicity, and age as constraints and find no likely matches in satellites down to the mass of Leo II. We propose that Pyxis probably originated in an unknown galaxy, which today is fully disrupted. Assuming that Pyxis is bound and not on a first approach, we derive a 68% lower limit on the mass of the Milky Way of 0.95*10^12 M_sun.
  • We present the rest-1500\AA\ UV luminosity functions (LF) for star-forming galaxies during the cosmic \textit{high noon} -- the peak of cosmic star formation rate at $1.5<z<3$. We use deep NUV imaging data obtained as part of the \textit{Hubble} Ultra-Violet Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF) program, along with existing deep optical and NIR coverage on the HUDF. We select F225W, F275W and F336W dropout samples using the Lyman break technique, along with samples in the corresponding redshift ranges selected using photometric redshifts and measure the rest-frame UV LF at $z\sim1.7,2.2,3.0$ respectively, using the modified maximum likelihood estimator. We perform simulations to quantify the survey and sample incompleteness for the UVUDF samples to correct the effective volume calculations for the LF. We select galaxies down to $M_{UV}=-15.9,-16.3,-16.8$ and fit a faint-end slope of $\alpha=-1.20^{+0.10}_{-0.13}, -1.32^{+0.10}_{-0.14}, -1.39^{+0.08}_{-0.12}$ at $1.4<z<1.9$, $1.8<z<2.6$, and $2.4<z<3.6$, respectively. We compare the star formation properties of $z\sim2$ galaxies from these UV observations with results from H\alpha\ and UV$+$IR observations. We find a lack of high SFR sources in the UV LF compared to the H\alpha\ and UV$+$IR, likely due to dusty SFGs not being properly accounted for by the generic $IRX-\beta$ relation used to correct for dust. We compute a volume-averaged UV-to-H\alpha\ ratio by \textit{abundance matching} the rest-frame UV LF and H\alpha\ LF. We find an increasing UV-to-H\alpha\ ratio towards low mass galaxies ($M_\star \lesssim 5\times10^9$ M$_\odot$). We conclude that this could be due to a larger contribution from starbursting galaxies compared to the high-mass end.
  • Motivated by the stellar fossil record of Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies, we show that the star-forming ancestors of the faintest ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs; ${\rm M}_{\rm V}$ $\sim -2$ or ${\rm M}_{\star}$ $\sim 10^{2}$ at $z=0$) had ultra-violet (UV) luminosities of ${\rm M}_{\rm UV}$ $\sim -3$ to $-6$ during reionization ($z\sim6-10$). The existence of such faint galaxies has substantial implications for early epochs of galaxy formation and reionization. If the faint-end slopes of the UV luminosity functions (UVLFs) during reionization are steep ($\alpha\lesssim-2$) to ${\rm M}_{\rm UV}$ $\sim -3$, then: (i) the ancestors of UFDs produced $>50$% of UV flux from galaxies; (ii) galaxies can maintain reionization with escape fractions that are $>$2 times lower than currently-adopted values; (iii) direct HST and JWST observations may detect only $\sim10-50$% of the UV light from galaxies; (iv) the cosmic star formation history increases by $\gtrsim4-6$ at $z\gtrsim6$. Significant flux from UFDs, and resultant tensions with LG dwarf galaxy counts, are reduced if the high-redshift UVLF turns over. Independent of the UVLF shape, the existence of a large population of UFDs requires a non-zero luminosity function to ${\rm M}_{\rm UV}$ $\sim -3$ during reionization.
  • We confirm that the object DDO216-A1 is a substantial globular cluster at the center of Local Group galaxy DDO216 (the Pegasus dwarf irregular), using Hubble Space Telescope ACS imaging. By fitting isochrones, we find the cluster metallicity to be [M/H] = -1.6 +/-0.2, for reddening E(B-V) = 0.16 +/-0.02; the best-fit age is 12.3 +/-0.8 Gyr. There are ~30 RR Lyrae variables in the cluster; the magnitude of the fundamental mode pulsators gives a distance modulus of 24.77 +/-0.08 - identical to the host galaxy. The ratio of overtone to fundamental mode variables and their mean periods make DDO216-A1 an Oosterhoff Type I cluster. We find an I-band central surface brightness 20.85 +/-0.17 F814W mag per square arcsecond, a half-light radius of 3.1 arcsec (13.4 pc), and an absolute magnitude M814 = -7.90 +/-0.16 (approximately 10^5 solar masses). King models fit to the cluster give the core radius and concentration index, r_c = 2.1" +/-0.9" and c = 1.24 +/-0.39. The cluster is an "extended" cluster somewhat typical of some dwarf galaxies and the outer halo of the Milky Way. The cluster is projected <30 pc south of the center of DDO216, unusually central compared to most dwarf galaxy globular clusters. Analytical models of dynamical friction and tidal destruction suggest that it probably formed at a larger distance, up to ~1 kpc, and migrated inward. DDO216 has an unexceptional cluster specific frequency, S_N = 10. DDO216 is the lowest-luminosity Local Group galaxy to host a 10^5 solar mass globular cluster, and the only transition-type (dSph/dIrr) in the Local Group with a globular.
  • We use Local Group galaxy counts together with the ELVIS N-body simulations to explore the relationship between the scatter and slope in the stellar mass vs. halo mass relation at low masses, $M_\star \simeq 10^5 - 10^8 M_\odot$. Assuming models with log-normal scatter about a median relation of the form $M_\star \propto M_\mathrm{halo}^\alpha$, the preferred log-slope steepens from $\alpha \simeq 1.8$ in the limit of zero scatter to $\alpha \simeq 2.6$ in the case of $2$ dex of scatter in $M_\star$ at fixed halo mass. We provide fitting functions for the best-fit relations as a function of scatter, including cases where the relation becomes increasingly stochastic with decreasing mass. We show that if the scatter at fixed halo mass is large enough ($\gtrsim 1$ dex) and if the median relation is steep enough ($\alpha \gtrsim 2$), then the "too-big-to-fail" problem seen in the Local Group can be self-consistently eliminated in about $\sim 5-10\%$ of realizations. This scenario requires that the most massive subhalos host unobservable ultra-faint dwarfs fairly often; we discuss potentially observable signatures of these systems. Finally, we compare our derived constraints to recent high-resolution simulations of dwarf galaxy formation in the literature. Though simulation-to-simulation scatter in $M_\star$ at fixed $M_\mathrm{halo}$ is large among separate authors ($\sim 2$ dex), individual codes produce relations with much less scatter and usually give relations that would over-produce local galaxy counts.
  • We perform a systematic Bayesian analysis of rotation vs. dispersion support ($v_{\rm rot} / \sigma$) in $40$ dwarf galaxies throughout the Local Volume (LV) over a stellar mass range $10^{3.5} M_{\rm \odot} < M_{\star} < 10^8 M_{\rm \odot}$. We find that the stars in $\sim 80\%$ of the LV dwarf galaxies studied -- both satellites and isolated systems -- are dispersion-supported. In particular, we show that $6/10$ *isolated* dwarfs in our sample have $v_{\rm rot} / \sigma < 1.0$. All have $v_{\rm rot} / \sigma \lesssim 2.0$. These results challenge the traditional view that the stars in gas-rich dwarf irregulars (dIrrs) are distributed in cold, rotationally-supported stellar disks, while gas-poor dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) are kinematically distinct in having dispersion-supported stars. We see no clear trend between $v_{\rm rot} / \sigma$ and distance to the closest $\rm L_{\star}$ galaxy, nor between $v_{\rm rot} / \sigma$ and $M_{\star}$ within our mass range. We apply the same Bayesian analysis to four FIRE hydrodynamic zoom-in simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies ($10^9 M_{\odot} < M_{\rm vir} < 10^{10} M_{\rm \odot}$) and show that the simulated *isolated* dIrr galaxies have stellar ellipticities and stellar $v_{\rm rot} / \sigma$ ratios that are consistent with the observed population of dIrrs *and* dSphs without the need to subject these dwarfs to any external perturbations or tidal forces. We posit that most dwarf galaxies form as puffy, dispersion-dominated systems, rather than cold, angular momentum-supported disks. If this is the case, then transforming a dIrr into a dSph may require little more than removing its gas.