• Quasar redshifts require the best possible precision and accuracy for a number of applications, such as setting the velocity scale for outflows as well as measuring small-scale quasar-quasar clustering. The most reliable redshift standard in luminous quasars is arguably the narrow [OIII] $\lambda\lambda$4959,5007 emission line doublet in the rest-frame optical. We use previously published [OIII] redshifts obtained using near-infrared spectra in a sample of 45 high-redshift (z > 2.2) quasars to evaluate redshift measurement techniques based on rest-frame ultraviolet spectra. At redshifts above z = 2.2 the MgII $\lambda$2798 emission line is not available in observed-frame optical spectra, and the most prominent unblended and unabsorbed spectral feature available is usually CIV $\lambda$1549. Peak and centroid measurements of the CIV profile are often blueshifted relative to the rest-frame of the quasar, which can significantly bias redshift determinations. We show that redshift determinations for these high-redshift quasars are significantly correlated with the emission-line properties of CIV (i.e., the equivalent width, or EW, and the full width at half maximum, or FWHM) as well as the luminosity, which we take from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We demonstrate that empirical corrections based on multiple regression analyses yield significant improvements in both the precision and accuracy of the redshifts of the most distant quasars and are required to establish consistency with redshifts determined in more local quasars.
  • We present quasar bolometric corrections using the [O III] $\lambda5007$ narrow emission line luminosity based on the detailed spectral energy distributions of 53 bright quasars at low to moderate redshift ($0.0345<z<1.0002$). We adopted two functional forms to calculate $L_{\textrm{iso}}$, the bolometric luminosity determined under the assumption of isotropy: $L_{\textrm{iso}}=A\,L_{[O\,III]}$ for comparison with the literature and log$(L_{iso})=B+C\,$log$(L_{[O\,III]})$, which better characterizes the data. We also explored whether "Eigenvector 1", which describes the range of quasar spectral properties and quantifies their diversity, introduces scatter into the $L_{[O\,III]}-L_{iso}$ relationship. We found that the [O III] bolometric correction can be significantly improved by adding a term including the equivalent width ratio $R_{Fe\,II}\equiv EW_{Fe\,II}/EW_{H\beta}$, which is an Eigenvector 1 indicator. Inclusion of $R_{Fe\,II}$ in predicting $L_{iso}$ is significant at nearly the $3\sigma$ level and reduces the scatter and systematic offset of the luminosity residuals. Typically, [O III] bolometric corrections are adopted for Type 2 sources where the quasar continuum is not observed and in these cases, $R_{Fe\,II}$ cannot be measured. We searched for an alternative measure of Eigenvector 1 that could be measured in the optical spectra of Type 2 sources but were unable to identify one. Thus, the main contribution of this work is to present an improved [O III] bolometric correction based on measured bolometric luminosities and highlight the Eigenvector 1 dependence of the correction in Type 1 sources.
  • The spectrum of a quasar contains important information about its properties. Thus, it can be expected that two quasars with similar spectra will have similar properties, but just how similar has not before been quantified. Here we compare the ultraviolet spectra of a sample of 5553 quasars from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, focusing on the $1350$ \AA \ $\leq \lambda \leq 2900$ \AA \ rest-frame region which contains prominent emission lines from \SiIV, O IV], \CIV, \CIII, and \MgII\ species. We use principal component analysis to determine the dominant components of spectral variation, as well as to quantitatively measure spectral similarity. As suggested by both the Baldwin effect and modified Baldwin effect, quasars with similar spectra have similar properties: bolometric luminosity, Eddington fraction, and black hole mass. The latter two quantities are calculated from the luminosity in conjunction with spectral features, and the variation between quasars with virtually identical spectra (which we call doppelg\"angers) is driven by the variance in the luminosity plus measurement uncertainties. In the doppelgangers the luminosity differences show 1$\sigma$ uncertainties of 57\% (or 0.63 magnitudes) and $\sim$70\% 1$\sigma$ uncertainties for mass and Eddington fraction. Much of the difference in luminosities may be attributable to time lags between the spectral lines and the continuum. Furthermore, we find that suggestions that the mostly highly accreting quasars should be better standard candles than other quasars are not bourne out for doppelgangers. Finally, we discuss the implications for using quasars as cosmological probes and the nature of the first two spectral principal components.
  • We investigate the orientation dependence of the spectral energy distributions in a sample of radio-loud quasars. Selected specifically to study orientation issues, the sample contains 52 sources with redshifts in the range 0.16<z<1.4 and measurements of radio core dominance, a radio orientation indicator. Measured properties include monochromatic luminosities at a range of wavelengths between the infrared and X-rays, integrated infrared luminosity, spectral slopes, and the covering fraction of the obscuring circumnuclear dust. We estimate dust covering fraction assuming that the accretion disk emits anisotropically and discuss the shortcomings and technical difficulties of this calculation. Luminosities are found to depend on orientation, with face-on sources factors of a 2-3 brighter than more edge-on sources, depending on wavelength. The degree of anisotropy varies very little with wavelength such that the overall shape of the spectral energy distribution does not vary significantly with orientation. In the infrared, we do not observe a decrease in anisotropy with increasing wavelength. The spectral slopes and estimates of covering fraction are not significantly orientation dependent. We construct composite spectral energy distributions as a function of radio core dominance and find that these illustrate the results determined from the measured properties.
  • Black hole masses are estimated for radio-loud quasars using several self-consistent scaling relationships based on emission-line widths and continuum luminosities. The emission lines used, H-beta, Mg II, and C IV, have different dependencies on orientation as estimated by radio core dominance. We compare differences in the log of black hole masses estimated from different emission lines and show that they depend on radio core dominance in the sense that core-dominated, jet-on objects have systematically smaller H-beta and Mg II determined masses compared to those from C IV, while lobe-dominated edge-on objects have systematically larger H-beta and Mg II determined masses compared to those from C IV. The effect is consistent with the H-beta line width, and to a lesser extent that of Mg II, being dependent upon orientation in the sense of a axisymmetric velocity field plus a projection effect. The size of the effect is nearly an order of magnitude in black hole mass going from one extreme orientation to the other. We find that radio spectral index is a good proxy for radio core dominance and repeating this analysis with radio spectral index yields similar results. Accounting for orientation could in principle significantly reduce the scatter in black hole mass scaling relationships, and we quantify and offer a correction for this effect cast in terms of radio core dominance and radio spectral index.
  • We have produced the next generation of quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), essentially updating the work of Elvis et al. (1994) by using high-quality data obtained with several space and ground-based telescopes, including NASA's Great Observatories. We present an atlas of SEDs of 85 optically bright, non-blazar quasars over the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to X-rays. The heterogeneous sample includes 27 radio-quiet and 58 radio-loud quasars. Most objects have quasi-simultaneous ultraviolet-optical spectroscopic data, supplemented with some far-ultraviolet spectra, and more than half also have Spitzer mid-infrared IRS spectra. The X-ray spectral parameters are collected from the literature where available. The radio, far-infrared, and near-infrared photometric data are also obtained from either the literature or new observations. We construct composite spectral energy distributions for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and compare these to those of Elvis et al., finding that ours have similar overall shapes, but our improved spectral resolution reveals more detailed features, especially in the mid and near-infrared.
  • We describe deep (40 orbits) HST/STIS observations of the BALQSO PG 0946+301 and make them available to the community. These observations are the major part of a multi-wavelength campaign on this object aimed at determining the ionization equilibrium and abundances (IEA) in broad absorption line (BAL) QSOs. We present simple template fits to the entire data set, which yield firm identifications for more than two dozen BALs from 18 ions and give lower limits for the ionic column densities. We find that the outflow's metalicity is consistent with being solar, while the abundance ratio of phosphorus to other metals is at least ten times solar. These findings are based on diagnostics that are not sensitive to saturation and partial covering effects in the BALs, which considerably weakened previous claims for enhanced metalicity. Ample evidence for these effects is seen in the spectrum. We also discuss several options for extracting tighter IEA constraints in future analyses, and present the significant temporal changes which are detected between these spectra and those taken by the HST/FOS in 1992.
  • We present the first near-IR spectroscopy of the z=1.5 radio-loud BALQSO FIRST J155633.8+351758. Both the Balmer decrement and the slope of the rest-frame UV-optical continuum independently suggest a modest amount of extinction along the line of sight to the BLR (E(B-V)~0.5 for SMC-type screen extinction at the QSO redshift). The implied gas column density along the line of sight is much less than is implied by the weak X-ray flux of the object, suggesting that either the BLR and BAL region have a low dust-to-gas ratio, or that the rest-frame optical light encounters significantly lower mean column density lines of sight than the X-ray emission. From the rest-frame UV-optical spectrum, we are able to constrain the stellar mass content of the system. Comparing the maximal stellar mass with the black hole mass estimated from the bolometric luminosity of the QSO, we find that the ratio of the black hole to stellar mass may be comparable to the Magorrian value, which would imply that the Magorrian relation is already in place at z=1.5. However, multiple factors favor a much larger black hole to stellar mass ratio. This would imply that if the Magorrian relation characterizes the late history of QSOs, and the situation observed for F1556+3517 is typical of the early evolutionary history of QSOs, central black hole masses develop more rapidly than bulge masses. [ABRIDGED]
  • We report the optical identification of an $R=18.3$ mag, $z=2.432$ quasar at the position of a 6 cm radio source and a faint \rosat PSPC X-ray source. The quasar lies within the error circles of unidentified extreme-UV (EUV) detections by the \euve and \rosat WFC all-sky surveys at $\sim 400$ \AA\ and $\sim 150$ \AA, respectively. A 21 cm H I emission measurement in the direction of the quasar with a $21'$-diameter beam yields a total H I column density of $N_{H}=3.3\times 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$, two orders of magnitude higher than the maximum allowed for transparency through the Galaxy in the EUV. The source of the EUV flux is therefore probably nearby ($\ltorder 100$ pc), and unrelated to the quasar.