• We propose a generalization of the best arm identification problem in stochastic multi-armed bandits (MAB) to the setting where every pull of an arm is associated with delayed feedback. The delay in feedback increases the effective sample complexity of standard algorithms, but can be offset if we have access to partial feedback received before a pull is completed. We propose a general framework to model the relationship between partial and delayed feedback, and as a special case we introduce efficient algorithms for settings where the partial feedback are biased or unbiased estimators of the delayed feedback. Additionally, we propose a novel extension of the algorithms to the parallel MAB setting where an agent can control a batch of arms. Our experiments in real-world settings, involving policy search and hyperparameter optimization in computational sustainability domains for fast charging of batteries and wildlife corridor construction, demonstrate that exploiting the structure of partial feedback can lead to significant improvements over baselines in both sequential and parallel MAB.
  • The Physical Unclonable Function (PUF) is a promising hardware security primitive because of its inherent uniqueness and low cost. To extract the device-specific variation from delay-based strong PUFs, complex routing constraints are imposed to achieve symmetric path delays; and systematic variations can severely compromise the uniqueness of the PUF. In addition, the metastability of the arbiter circuit of an Arbiter PUF can also degrade the quality of the PUF due to the induced instability. In this paper we propose a novel strong UNBIAS PUF that can be implemented purely by Register Transfer Language (RTL), such as verilog, without imposing any physical design constraints or delay characterization effort to solve the aforementioned issues. Efficient inspection bit prediction models for unbiased response extraction are proposed and validated. Our experimental results of the strong UNBIAS PUF show 5.9% intra-Fractional Hamming Distance (FHD) and 45.1% inter-FHD on 7 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) boards without applying any physical layout constraints or additional XOR gates. The UNBIAS PUF is also scalable because no characterization cost is required for each challenge to compensate the implementation bias. The averaged intra-FHD measured at worst temperature and voltage variation conditions is 12%, which is still below the margin of practical Error Correction Code (ECC) with error reduction techniques for PUFs.
  • We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of bianisotropic Huygens' metasurfaces (BHMSs) for refraction of normally incident beams towards 71.8 degrees. As previously shown, all three BHMS degrees of freedom, namely, electric polarizability, magnetic polarizability and omega-type magnetoelectric coupling, are required to ensure no reflections occur for such wide-angle impedance mismatch. The unit cells are composed of three metallic layers, yielding a printed-circuit-board (PCB) structure. The fabricated BHMS is characterized in a quasi-optical setup, used to accurately assess specular reflections. Subsequently, the horn-illuminated BHMS' radiation pattern is measured in a far-field chamber, to evaluate the device's refraction characteristics. The measured results verify that the BHMS has negligible reflections, and the majority of the scattered power is coupled to the desirable Floquet-Bloch mode. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration of such a reflectionless wide-angle refracting metasurface.
  • Fourier ptychography is a new computational microscopy technique that provides gigapixel-scale intensity and phase images with both wide field-of-view and high resolution. By capturing a stack of low-resolution images under different illumination angles, a nonlinear inverse algorithm can be used to computationally reconstruct the high-resolution complex field. Here, we compare and classify multiple proposed inverse algorithms in terms of experimental robustness. We find that the main sources of error are noise, aberrations and mis-calibration (i.e. model mis-match). Using simulations and experiments, we demonstrate that the choice of cost function plays a critical role, with amplitude-based cost functions performing better than intensity-based ones. The reason for this is that Fourier ptychography datasets consist of images from both brightfield and darkfield illumination, representing a large range of measured intensities. Both noise (e.g. Poisson noise) and model mis-match errors are shown to scale with intensity. Hence, algorithms that use an appropriate cost function will be more tolerant to both noise and model mis-match. Given these insights, we propose a global Newton's method algorithm which is robust and computationally efficient. Finally, we discuss the impact of procedures for algorithmic correction of aberrations and mis-calibration.
  • We demonstrate a new computational illumination technique that achieves large space-bandwidth-time product, for quantitative phase imaging of unstained live samples in vitro. Microscope lenses can have either large field of view (FOV) or high resolution, not both. Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is a new computational imaging technique that circumvents this limit by fusing information from multiple images taken with different illumination angles. The result is a gigapixel-scale image having both wide FOV and high resolution, i.e. large space-bandwidth product (SBP). FPM has enormous potential for revolutionizing microscopy and has already found application in digital pathology. However, it suffers from long acquisition times (on the order of minutes), limiting throughput. Faster capture times would not only improve imaging speed, but also allow studies of live samples, where motion artifacts degrade results. In contrast to fixed (e.g. pathology) slides, live samples are continuously evolving at various spatial and temporal scales. Here, we present a new source coding scheme, along with real-time hardware control, to achieve 0.8 NA resolution across a 4x FOV with sub-second capture times. We propose an improved algorithm and new initialization scheme, which allow robust phase reconstruction over long time-lapse experiments. We present the first FPM results for both growing and confluent in vitro cell cultures, capturing videos of subcellular dynamical phenomena in popular cell lines undergoing division and migration. Our method opens up FPM to applications with live samples, for observing rare events in both space and time.
  • We report an experimental and a theoretical study of the radial elasticity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a function of external radius. We use atomic force microscopy and apply small indentation amplitudes in order to stay in the linear elasticity regime. The number of layers for a given tube radius is inferred from transmission electron microscopy, revealing constant ratios of external to internal radii. This enables a comparison with molecular dynamics results, which also shed some light onto the applicability of Hertz theory in this context. Using this theory, we find a radial Young modulus strongly decreasing with increasing radius and reaching an asymptotic value of 30 +/- 10 GPa.