• Željko Ivezić, Steven M. Kahn, J. Anthony Tyson, Bob Abel, Emily Acosta, Robyn Allsman, David Alonso, Yusra AlSayyad, Scott F. Anderson, John Andrew, James Roger P. Angel, George Z. Angeli, Reza Ansari, Pierre Antilogus, Constanza Araujo, Robert Armstrong, Kirk T. Arndt, Pierre Astier, Éric Aubourg, Nicole Auza, Tim S. Axelrod, Deborah J. Bard, Jeff D. Barr, Aurelian Barrau, James G. Bartlett, Amanda E. Bauer, Brian J. Bauman, Sylvain Baumont, Andrew C. Becker, Jacek Becla, Cristina Beldica, Steve Bellavia, Federica B. Bianco, Rahul Biswas, Guillaume Blanc, Jonathan Blazek, Roger D. Blandford, Josh S. Bloom, Joanne Bogart, Tim W. Bond, Anders W. Borgland, Kirk Borne, James F. Bosch, Dominique Boutigny, Craig A. Brackett, Andrew Bradshaw, William Nielsen Brandt, Michael E. Brown, James S. Bullock, Patricia Burchat, David L. Burke, Gianpietro Cagnoli, Daniel Calabrese, Shawn Callahan, Alice L. Callen, Srinivasan Chandrasekharan, Glenaver Charles-Emerson, Steve Chesley, Elliott C. Cheu, Hsin-Fang Chiang, James Chiang, Carol Chirino, Derek Chow, David R. Ciardi, Charles F. Claver, Johann Cohen-Tanugi, Joseph J. Cockrum, Rebecca Coles, Andrew J. Connolly, Kem H. Cook, Asantha Cooray, Kevin R. Covey, Chris Cribbs, Wei Cui, Roc Cutri, Philip N. Daly, Scott F. Daniel, Felipe Daruich, Guillaume Daubard, Greg Daues, William Dawson, Francisco Delgado, Alfred Dellapenna, Robert de Peyster, Miguel de Val-Borro, Seth W. Digel, Peter Doherty, Richard Dubois, Gregory P. Dubois-Felsmann, Josef Durech, Frossie Economou, Michael Eracleous, Henry Ferguson, Enrique Figueroa, Merlin Fisher-Levine, Warren Focke, Michael D. Foss, James Frank, Michael D. Freemon, Emmanuel Gangler, Eric Gawiser, John C. Geary, Perry Gee, Marla Geha, Charles J. B. Gessner, Robert R. Gibson, D. Kirk Gilmore, Thomas Glanzman, William Glick, Tatiana Goldina, Daniel A. Goldstein, Iain Goodenow, Melissa L. Graham, William J. Gressler, Philippe Gris, Leanne P. Guy, Augustin Guyonnet, Gunther Haller, Ron Harris, Patrick A. Hascall, Justine Haupt, Fabio Hernandez, Sven Herrmann, Edward Hileman, Joshua Hoblitt, John A. Hodgson, Craig Hogan, Dajun Huang, Michael E. Huffer, Patrick Ingraham, Walter R. Innes, Suzanne H. Jacoby, Bhuvnesh Jain, Fabrice Jammes, James Jee, Tim Jenness, Garrett Jernigan, Darko Jevremović, Kenneth Johns, Anthony S. Johnson, Margaret W.G. Johnson, R. Lynne Jones, Claire Juramy-Gilles, Mario Jurić, Jason S. Kalirai, Nitya J. Kallivayalil, Bryce Kalmbach, Jeffrey P. Kantor, Pierre Karst, Mansi M. Kasliwal, Heather Kelly, Richard Kessler, Veronica Kinnison, David Kirkby, Lloyd Knox, Ivan V. Kotov, Victor L. Krabbendam, K. Simon Krughoff, Petr Kubánek, John Kuczewski, Shri Kulkarni, John Ku, Nadine R. Kurita, Craig S. Lage, Ron Lambert, Travis Lange, J. Brian Langton, Laurent Le Guillou, Deborah Levine, Ming Liang, Kian-Tat Lim, Chris J. Lintott, Kevin E. Long, Margaux Lopez, Paul J. Lotz, Robert H. Lupton, Nate B. Lust, Lauren A. MacArthur, Ashish Mahabal, Rachel Mandelbaum, Darren S. Marsh, Philip J. Marshall, Stuart Marshall, Morgan May, Robert McKercher, Michelle McQueen, Joshua Meyers, Myriam Migliore, Michelle Miller, David J. Mills, Connor Miraval, Joachim Moeyens, David G. Monet, Marc Moniez, Serge Monkewitz, Christopher Montgomery, Fritz Mueller, Gary P. Muller, Freddy Muñoz Arancibia, Douglas R. Neill, Scott P. Newbry, Jean-Yves Nief, Andrei Nomerotski, Martin Nordby, Paul O'Connor, John Oliver, Scot S. Olivier, Knut Olsen, William O'Mullane, Sandra Ortiz, Shawn Osier, Russell E. Owen, Reynald Pain, Paul E. Palecek, John K. Parejko, James B. Parsons, Nathan M. Pease, J. Matt Peterson, John R. Peterson, Donald L. Petravick, M.E. Libby Petrick, Cathy E. Petry, Francesco Pierfederici, Stephen Pietrowicz, Rob Pike, Philip A. Pinto, Raymond Plante, Stephen Plate, Paul A. Price, Michael Prouza, Veljko Radeka, Jayadev Rajagopal, Andrew P. Rasmussen, Nicolas Regnault, Kevin A. Reil, David J. Reiss, Michael A. Reuter, Stephen T. Ridgway, Vincent J. Riot, Steve Ritz, Sean Robinson, William Roby, Aaron Roodman, Wayne Rosing, Cecille Roucelle, Matthew R. Rumore, Stefano Russo, Abhijit Saha, Benoit Sassolas, Terry L. Schalk, Pim Schellart, Rafe H. Schindler, Samuel Schmidt, Donald P. Schneider, Michael D. Schneider, William Schoening, German Schumacher, Megan E. Schwamb, Jacques Sebag, Brian Selvy, Glenn H. Sembroski, Lynn G. Seppala, Andrew Serio, Eduardo Serrano, Richard A. Shaw, Ian Shipsey, Jonathan Sick, Nicole Silvestri, Colin T. Slater, J. Allyn Smith, R. Chris Smith, Shahram Sobhani, Christine Soldahl, Lisa Storrie-Lombardi, Edward Stover, Michael A. Strauss, Rachel A. Street, Christopher W. Stubbs, Ian S. Sullivan, Donald Sweeney, John D. Swinbank, Alexander Szalay, Peter Takacs, Stephen A. Tether, Jon J. Thaler, John Gregg Thayer, Sandrine Thomas, Vaikunth Thukral, Jeffrey Tice, David E. Trilling, Max Turri, Richard Van Berg, Daniel Vanden Berk, Kurt Vetter, Francoise Virieux, Tomislav Vucina, William Wahl, Lucianne Walkowicz, Brian Walsh, Christopher W. Walter, Daniel L. Wang, Shin-Yawn Wang, Michael Warner, Oliver Wiecha, Beth Willman, Scott E. Winters, David Wittman, Sidney C. Wolff, W. Michael Wood-Vasey, Xiuqin Wu, Bo Xin, Peter Yoachim, Hu Zhan
    May 23, 2018 astro-ph
    (Abridged) We describe here the most ambitious survey currently planned in the optical, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). A vast array of science will be enabled by a single wide-deep-fast sky survey, and LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: probing dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. LSST will be a wide-field ground-based system sited at Cerro Pach\'{o}n in northern Chile. The telescope will have an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg$^2$ field of view, and a 3.2 Gigapixel camera. The standard observing sequence will consist of pairs of 15-second exposures in a given field, with two such visits in each pointing in a given night. With these repeats, the LSST system is capable of imaging about 10,000 square degrees of sky in a single filter in three nights. The typical 5$\sigma$ point-source depth in a single visit in $r$ will be $\sim 24.5$ (AB). The project is in the construction phase and will begin regular survey operations by 2022. The survey area will be contained within 30,000 deg$^2$ with $\delta<+34.5^\circ$, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, $ugrizy$, covering the wavelength range 320--1050 nm. About 90\% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will uniformly observe a 18,000 deg$^2$ region about 800 times (summed over all six bands) during the anticipated 10 years of operations, and yield a coadded map to $r\sim27.5$. The remaining 10\% of the observing time will be allocated to projects such as a Very Deep and Fast time domain survey. The goal is to make LSST data products, including a relational database of about 32 trillion observations of 40 billion objects, available to the public and scientists around the world.
  • We infer gravitational lensing shear and convergence fields from galaxy ellipticity catalogs under a spatial process prior for the lensing potential. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm with simulated Gaussian-distributed cosmological lensing shear maps and a reconstruction of the mass distribution of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 781 using galaxy ellipticities measured with the Deep Lens Survey. Given interim posterior samples of lensing shear or convergence fields on the sky, we describe an algorithm to infer cosmological parameters via lens field marginalization. In the most general formulation of our algorithm we make no assumptions about weak shear or Gaussian distributed shape noise or shears. Because we require solutions and matrix determinants of a linear system of dimension that scales with the number of galaxies, we expect our algorithm to require parallel high-performance computing resources for application to ongoing wide field lensing surveys.
  • We present a Bayesian algorithm to combine optical imaging of unresolved objects from distinct epochs and observation platforms for orbit determination and tracking. By propagating the non-Gaussian uncertainties we are able to optimally combine imaging of arbitrary signal-to-noise ratios, allowing the integration of data from low-cost sensors. Our Bayesian approach to image characterization also allows large compression of imaging data without loss of statistical information. With a computationally efficient algorithm to combine multiple observation epochs and multiple telescopes, we show statistically optimal orbit inferences.
  • We have developed a maximum likelihood source detection method capable of detecting ultra-faint streaks with surface brightnesses approximately an order of magnitude fainter than the pixel level noise. Our maximum likelihood detection method is a model based approach that requires no a priori knowledge about the streak location, orientation, length, or surface brightness. This method enables discovery of typically undiscovered objects, and enables the utilization of low-cost sensors (i.e., higher-noise data). The method also easily facilitates multi-epoch co-addition. We will present the results from the application of this method to simulations, as well as real low earth orbit observations.
  • We present a tomographic cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), which, providing a limiting magnitude r_{lim}~27 (5 sigma), is designed as a pre-cursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. We use a luminosity-dependent nonlinear model to account for the astrophysical systematics originating from intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing >10 sq. deg cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9-year results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) gives Omega_m=0.293_{-0.014}^{+0.012}, sigma_8=0.833_{-0.018}^{+0.011}, H_0=68.6_{-1.2}^{+1.4} km/s/Mpc, and Omega_b=0.0475+-0.0012 for LCDM, reducing the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ~50%. When we do not assume flatness for LCDM, we obtain the curvature constraint Omega_k=-0.010_{-0.015}^{+0.013} from the DLS+WMAP9 combination, which however is not well constrained when WMAP9 is used alone. The dark energy equation of state parameter w is tightly constrained when Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) data are added, yielding w=-1.02_{-0.09}^{+0.10} with the DLS+WMAP9+BAO joint probe. The addition of supernova constraints further tightens the parameter to w=-1.03+-0.03. Our joint constraints are fully consistent with the final Planck results and also the predictions of a LCDM universe.
  • Using overlapping fields with space-based Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based Subaru Telescope imaging we identify a population of blended galaxies that are blended to such a large degree that they are detected as single objects in the ground-based monochromatic imaging, which we label as 'ambiguous blends'. For deep imaging data, such as the depth targeted with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the ambiguous blend population is both large ($\sim 14$%) and has a distribution of ellipticities that is different from that of unblended objects in a way that will likely be important for the weak lensing measurements. Most notably, for a limiting magnitude of $i \sim 27$ we find that ambiguous blending results in a ~14% increase in shear noise (or ~12% decrease in the effective projected number density of lensed galaxies; neff) due to 1) larger intrinsic ellipticity dispersion, 2) a scaling with the galaxy number density $N_{gal}$ that is shallower than 1/$\sqrt{N_{gal}}$. For the LSST Gold Sample ($i < 25.3$) there is a ~7% increase in shear noise (or ~7% decrease in $n_{eff}$). More importantly than these increases in the shear noise, we find that the ellipticity distribution of ambiguous blends has an RMS 13% larger than that of non-blended galaxies. Given the need of future weak lensing surveys to constrain the ellipticity distribution of galaxies to better than a percent in order to mitigate cosmic shear multiplicative biases, the different ellipticity distribution of ambiguous blends could be a dominant systematic if unaccounted for.
  • We present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically-varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially-varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by $\sim 1$ per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the S\'{e}rsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods' results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.
  • Point estimators for the shearing of galaxy images induced by gravitational lensing involve a complex inverse problem in the presence of noise, pixelization, and model uncertainties. We present a probabilistic forward modeling approach to gravitational lensing inference that has the potential to mitigate the biased inferences in most common point estimators and is practical for upcoming lensing surveys. The first part of our statistical framework requires specification of a likelihood function for the pixel data in an imaging survey given parameterized models for the galaxies in the images. We derive the lensing shear posterior by marginalizing over all intrinsic galaxy properties that contribute to the pixel data (i.e., not limited to galaxy ellipticities) and learn the distributions for the intrinsic galaxy properties via hierarchical inference with a suitably flexible conditional probabilitiy distribution specification. We use importance sampling to separate the modeling of small imaging areas from the global shear inference, thereby rendering our algorithm computationally tractable for large surveys. With simple numerical examples we demonstrate the improvements in accuracy from our importance sampling approach, as well as the significance of the conditional distribution specification for the intrinsic galaxy properties when the data are generated from an unknown number of distinct galaxy populations with different morphological characteristics.
  • We present a maximum-likelihood weak lensing analysis of the mass distribution in optically selected spectroscopic Galaxy Groups (G$^3$Cv5) in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, using background Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric galaxies. The scaling of halo mass, $M_h$, with various group observables is investigated. Our main results are: 1) the measured relations of halo mass with group luminosity, virial volume and central galaxy stellar mass, $M_\star$, agree very well with predictions from mock group catalogues constructed from a GALFORM semi-analytical galaxy formation model implemented in the Millennium $\Lambda$CDM N-body simulation; 2) the measured relations of halo mass with velocity dispersion and projected half-abundance radius show weak tension with mock predictions, hinting at problems in the mock galaxy dynamics and their small scale distribution; 3) the median $M_h|M_\star$ measured from weak lensing depends more sensitively on the lognormal dispersion in $M_\star$ at fixed $M_h$ than it does on the median $M_\star|M_h$. Our measurements suggest an intrinsic dispersion of $\sigma_{\log(M_\star)}\sim 0.15$; 4) Comparing our mass estimates with those in the catalogue, we find that the G$^3$Cv5 mass can give biased results when used to select subsets of the group sample. Of the various new halo mass estimators that we calibrate using our weak lensing measurements, group luminosity is the best single-proxy estimator of group mass.
  • I present an estimator for the angular cross-correlation of two tracers of the cosmological large-scale structure that utilizes redshift information to isolate separate physical contributions. The estimator is derived by solving the Limber equation for a re-weighting of the foreground tracer that nulls either clustering or lensing contributions to the cross-correlation function. Applied to future photometric surveys, the estimator can enhance the measurement of gravitational lensing magnification effects to provide a competitive independent constraint on the dark energy equation of state.
  • Extracting parameter constraints from cosmological observations requires accurate determination of the covariance matrix for use in the likelihood function. We show here that uncertainties in the elements of the covariance matrix propagate directly to increased uncertainties in cosmological parameters. When the covariance matrix is determined by simulations, the resulting variance of the each parameter increases by a factor of order $1+N_b/N_s$ where $N_b$ is the number of bands in the measurement and $N_s$ is the number of simulations.
  • We constrain the distributions of projected radial alignment angles of satellite galaxy shapes within the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey group catalogue. We identify the galaxy groups using spectroscopic redshifts and measure galaxy projected ellipticities from Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging. With a sample of 3,850 groups with 13,655 satellite galaxies with high quality shape measurements, we find a less than 2-sigma signal of radial alignments in the mean projected ellipticity components and the projected position angle when using galaxy shape estimates optimized for weak lensing measurements. Our radial alignment measurement increases to greater than 3-sigma significance relative to the expectation for no alignments if we use 2-D S\'ersic model fits to define galaxy orientations. Our weak measurement of radial alignments is in conflict with predictions from dark matter N-body simulations, which we interpret as evidence for large mis-alignments of baryons and dark matter in group and cluster satellites. Within our uncertainties, that are dominated by our small sample size, we find only weak and marginally significant trends of the radial alignment angle distributions on projected distance from the group centre, host halo mass, and redshift that could be consistent with a tidal torquing mechanism for radial alignments. Using our lensing optimized shape estimators, we estimate that intrinsic alignments of galaxy group members may contribute a systematic error to the mean differential projected surface mass density of groups inferred from weak lensing observations by -1 +/- 20% at scales around 300 kpc/h from the group centre assuming a photometric redshift r.m.s. error of 10%, and given our group sample with median redshift of 0.17 and median virial masses ~10^{13} h^{-1}M_{sun}.
  • We describe a statistical model to estimate the covariance matrix of matter tracer two-point correlation functions with cosmological simulations. Assuming a fixed number of cosmological simulation runs, we describe how to build a `statistical emulator' of the two-point function covariance over a specified range of input cosmological parameters. Because the simulation runs with different cosmological models help to constrain the form of the covariance, we predict that the cosmology-dependent covariance may be estimated with a comparable number of simulations as would be needed to estimate the covariance for fixed cosmology. Our framework is a necessary first step in planning a simulations campaign for analyzing the next generation of cosmological surveys.
  • We present a cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), a deep BVRz multi-band imaging survey of five 4 sq. degree fields with two National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) 4-meter telescopes at Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo. For both telescopes, the change of the point-spread-function (PSF) shape across the focal plane is complicated, and the exposure-to-exposure variation of this position-dependent PSF change is significant. We overcome this challenge by modeling the PSF separately for individual exposures and CCDs with principal component analysis (PCA). We find that stacking these PSFs reproduces the final PSF pattern on the mosaic image with high fidelity, and the method successfully separates PSF-induced systematics from gravitational lensing effects. We calibrate our shears and estimate the errors, utilizing an image simulator, which generates sheared ground-based galaxy images from deep Hubble Space Telescope archival data with a realistic atmospheric turbulence model. For cosmological parameter constraints, we marginalize over shear calibration error, photometric redshift uncertainty, and the Hubble constant. We use cosmology-dependent covariances for the Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis and find that the role of this varying covariance is critical in our parameter estimation. Our current non-tomographic analysis alone constrains the Omega_M-sigma_8 likelihood contour tightly, providing a joint constraint of Omega_M=0.262+-0.051 and sigma_8=0.868+-0.071. We expect that a future DLS weak-lensing tomographic study will further tighten these constraints because explicit treatment of the redshift dependence of cosmic shear more efficiently breaks the Omega_M-sigma_8 degeneracy. Combining the current results with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7-year (WMAP7) likelihood data, we obtain Omega_M=0.278+-0.018 and sigma_8=0.815+-0.020.
  • We present measurements of the triaxial dark matter halo shapes and alignment correlation functions in the Millennium and Millennium-2 dark matter N-body simulations. These two simulations allow us to measure the distributions of halo shapes down to 10% of the virial radius over a halo mass range of 6E9 - 2E14 M_sun/h. We largely confirm previous results on the distributions of halo axis ratios as a function of halo mass, but we find that the median angle between halo major axes at different halo radii can vary by a factor of 2 between the Millennium-1 and 2 simulations because of the different mass resolution. Thus, error in the shape determinations from limited resolution is potentially degenerate with the misalignment of halo inner and outer shapes used to constrain Brightest Cluster Galaxy alignments in previous works. We also present simplifying parameterizations for the 3-D halo-mass alignment correlation functions that are necessary ingredients for triaxial halo models of large-scale structure and models of galaxy intrinsic alignments as contaminants for cosmic shear surveys. We measure strong alignments between halos of all masses and the surrounding dark matter overdensities out to several tens of Mpc/h, in agreement with observed shear-galaxy and cluster shape correlations. We use these measurements to forecast the contribution to the weak lensing signal around galaxy clusters from correlated mass along the line-of-sight. For prolate clusters with major axes aligned with the line-of-sight the fraction of the weak lensing signal from mass external to the cluster can be twice that predicted if the excess halo alignment correlation is assumed to be zero.
  • We present measurements of a population of matched radio sources at 1.4 and 5 GHz down to a flux limit of 1.5 mJy in 7 sq. degs. of the NOAO Deep Field South. We find a significant fraction of sources with inverted spectral indices that all have 1.4 GHz fluxes less than 10 mJy, and are therefore too faint to have been detected and included in previous radio source count models that are matched at multiple frequencies. Combined with the matched source population at 1.4 and 5 GHz in 1 sq. deg. in the ATESP survey, we update models for the 5 GHz differential number counts and distributions of spectral indices in 5 GHz flux bins that can be used to estimate the unresolved point source contribution to the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. We find a shallower logarithmic slope in the 5 GHz differential counts than in previously published models for fluxes < 100 mJy as well as larger fractions of inverted spectral indices at these fluxes. Because the Planck flux limit for resolved sources is larger than 100 mJy in all channels, our modified number counts yield at most a 10% change in the predicted Poisson contribution to the Planck temperature power spectrum. For a flux cut of 5 mJy with the South Pole Telescope and a flux cut of 20 mJy with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope we predict a ~30% and ~10% increase, respectively, in the radio source Poisson power in the lowest frequency channels of each experiment relative to that predicted by previous models.
  • We describe a Bayesian sampling model for linking and constraining orbit models from angular observations of "streaks" in optical telescope images. Our algorithm is particularly suited to situations where the observation times are small fractions of the orbital periods of the observed objects or when there is significant confusion of objects in the observation field. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo to sample from the joint posterior distribution of the parameters of multiple orbit models (up to the number of observed tracks) and parameters describing which tracks are linked with which orbit models. Using this algorithm, we forecast the constraints on geosynchronous (GEO) debris orbits achievable with the planned Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Because of the short 15 second exposure times, preliminary orbit determinations of GEO objects from LSST will have large and degenerate errors on the orbital elements. Combined with the expected crowded fields of GEO debris it will be challenging to reliably link orbital tracks in LSST observations given the currently planned observing cadence.
  • We present an algorithm for quickly generating multiple realizations of N-body simulations to be used, for example, for cosmological parameter estimation from surveys of large-scale structure. Our algorithm uses a new method to resample the large-scale (Gaussian-distributed) Fourier modes in a periodic N-body simulation box in a manner that properly accounts for the nonlinear mode-coupling between large and small scales. We find that our method for adding new large-scale mode realizations recovers the nonlinear power spectrum to sub-percent accuracy on scales larger than about half the Nyquist frequency of the simulation box. Using 20 N-body simulations, we obtain a power spectrum covariance matrix estimate that matches the estimator in Takahashi et al. (2009) (from 5000 simulations) with < 20% errors in all matrix elements. Comparing the rates of convergence, we determine that our algorithm requires ~ 8 times fewer simulations to achieve a given error tolerance in estimates of the power spectrum covariance matrix. The degree of success of our algorithm indicates that we understand the main physical processes that give rise to the correlations in the matter power spectrum. Namely, the large-scale Fourier modes modulate both the degree of structure growth through the variation in the effective local matter density and also the spatial frequency of small-scale perturbations through large-scale displacements. We expect our algorithm to be useful for noise modeling when constraining cosmological parameters from weak lensing (cosmic shear) and galaxy surveys, rescaling summary statistics of N-body simulations for new cosmological parameter values, and any applications where the influence of Fourier modes larger than the simulation size must be accounted for.
  • Simulation design is the choice of locations in parameter space at which simulations are to be run and is the first step in building an emulator capable of quickly providing estimates of simulation results for arbitrary locations in the parameter space. We introduce an alteration to the "OALHS" design used by Heitmann et al. (2006) that reduces the number of simulation runs required to achieve a fixed accuracy in our case study by a factor of two. We also compare interpolation procedures for emulators and find that interpolation via Gaussian Process models and via the much-easier-to-implement polynomial interpolation have comparable accuracy. A very simple emulation-building procedure consisting of a design sampled from the parameter prior distribution, combined with interpolation via polynomials also performs well. Although our primary motivation is efficient emulators of non-linear cosmological N-body simulations, in an appendix we describe an emulator for the CMB temperature power spectrum publicly available as computer code.
  • Aims: We outline the Bayesian approach to inferring f_NL, the level of non-Gaussianity of local type. Phrasing f_NL inference in a Bayesian framework takes advantage of existing techniques to account for instrumental effects and foreground contamination in CMB data and takes into account uncertainties in the cosmological parameters in an unambiguous way. Methods: We derive closed form expressions for the joint posterior of f_NL and the reconstructed underlying curvature perturbation, Phi, and deduce the conditional probability densities for f_NL and Phi. Completing the inference problem amounts to finding the marginal density for f_NL. For realistic data sets the necessary integrations are intractable. We propose an exact Hamiltonian sampling algorithm to generate correlated samples from the f_NL posterior. For sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratios, we can exploit the assumption of weak non-Gaussianity to find a direct Monte Carlo technique to generate independent samples from the posterior distribution for f_NL. We illustrate our approach using a simplified toy model of CMB data for the simple case of a 1-D sky. Results: When applied to our toy problem, we find that, in the limit of high signal-to-noise, the sampling efficiency of the approximate algorithm outperforms that of Hamiltonian sampling by two orders of magnitude. When f_NL is not significantly constrained by the data, the more efficient, approximate algorithm biases the posterior density towards f_NL = 0.
  • Correlations between intrinsic ellipticities of galaxies are a potentially important systematic error when constraining dark energy properties from weak gravitational lensing (cosmic shear) surveys. In the absence of perfectly known galaxy redshifts some modeling of the galaxy intrinsic alignments is likely to be required to extract the lensing signal to sufficient accuracy. We present a new model based on the placement of galaxies into dark matter halos. The central galaxy ellipticity follows the large scale potential and, in the simplest case, the satellite galaxies point at the halo center. The two-halo term is then dominated by the linear alignment model and the one-halo term provides a motivated extension of intrinsic alignment models to small scales. We provide fitting formulae for the spatial projected source power spectra for both intrinsic-intrinsic (II) and shear-intrinsic (GI) correlations. We illustrate the potential impact of ignoring intrinsic alignments on cosmological parameter constraints from non-tomographic surveys, finding that sigma_8 could be underestimated by up to the size of the current 1-sigma error bar from cosmic shear if very small scales are included in the analysis. Finally, we highlight areas of interest for numerical simulations of dark matter clustering and galaxy formation that can further constrain the intrinsic alignment signal.
  • We describe an approximate statistical model for the sample variance distribution of the non-linear matter power spectrum that can be calibrated from limited numbers of simulations. Our model retains the common assumption of a multivariate Normal distribution for the power spectrum band powers, but takes full account of the (parameter dependent) power spectrum covariance. The model is calibrated using an extension of the framework in Habib et al. (2007) to train Gaussian processes for the power spectrum mean and covariance given a set of simulation runs over a hypercube in parameter space. We demonstrate the performance of this machinery by estimating the parameters of a power-law model for the power spectrum. Within this framework, our calibrated sample variance distribution is robust to errors in the estimated covariance and shows rapid convergence of the posterior parameter constraints with the number of training simulations.