• $\eta$ Car is a massive, eccentric binary with a rich observational history. We obtained the first high-cadence, high-precision light curves with the BRITE-Constellation nanosatellites over 6 months in 2016 and 6 months in 2017. The light curve is contaminated by several sources including the Homunculus nebula and neighboring stars, including the eclipsing binary CPD$-$59$^\circ$2628. However, we found two coherent oscillations in the light curve. These may represent pulsations that are not yet understood but we postulate that they are related to tidally excited oscillations of $\eta$ Car's primary star, and would be similar to those detected in lower-mass eccentric binaries. In particular, one frequency was previously detected by van Genderen et al. and Sterken et al. through the time period of 1974 to 1995 through timing measurements of photometric maxima. Thus, this frequency seems to have been detected for nearly four decades, indicating that it has been stable in frequency over this time span. These pulsations could help provide the first direct constraints on the fundamental parameters of the primary star if confirmed and refined with future observations.
  • We have monitored the massive binary star $\eta$ Carinae with the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5~m telescope and CHIRON spectrograph from the previous apastron passage of the system through the recent 2014.6 periastron passage. Our monitoring has resulted in a large, homogeneous data set with an unprecedented time-sampling, spectral resolving power, and signal-to-noise. This allowed us to investigate temporal variability previously unexplored in the system and discover a kinematic structure in the P Cygni absorption troughs of neutral helium wind lines. The features observed occurred prior to the periastron passage and are seen as we look through the trailing arm of the wind-wind collision shock cone. We show that the bulk of the variability is repeatable across the last five periastron passages, and that the absorption occurs in the inner 230 AU of the system. In addition, we found an additional, high-velocity absorption component super-imposed on the P Cygni absorption troughs that has been previously un-observed in these lines, but which bears resemblance to the observations of the He~I $\lambda$10830 \AA\ feature across previous cycles. Through a comparison of the current smoothed particle hydrodynamical simulations, we show that the observed variations are likely caused by instabilities in the wind-wind collision region in our line-of-sight, coupled with stochastic variability related to clumping in the winds.
  • The X-ray emission of $\eta$ Carinae shows multiple features at various spatial and temporal scales. The central constant emission (CCE) component is centred on the binary and arises from spatial scales much smaller than the bipolar Homunculus nebula, but likely larger than the central wind--wind collision region between the stars as it does not vary over the $\sim$2-3 month X-ray minimum when it can be observed. Using large-scale 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, we model both the colliding-wind region between the stars, and the region where the secondary wind collides with primary wind ejected from the previous periastron passage. The simulations extend out to one hundred semimajor axes and make two limiting assumptions (strong coupling and no coupling) about the influence of the primary radiation field on the secondary wind. We perform 3D radiative transfer calculations on the SPH output to synthesize the X-ray emission, with the aim of reproducing the CCE spectrum. For the preferred primary mass-loss rate $\dot{M}_A\approx8.5\times10^{-4}$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, the model spectra well reproduce the observation as the strong- and no-coupling spectra bound the CCE observation for longitude of periastron $\omega\approx252^\circ$, and bound/converge on the observation for $\omega\approx90^\circ$. This suggests that $\eta$ Carinae has moderate coupling between the primary radiation and secondary wind, that both the region between the stars and the comoving collision on the backside of the secondary generate the CCE, and that the CCE cannot place constraints on the binary's line of sight. We also discuss comparisons with common X-ray fitting parameters.
  • The evolved, massive highly eccentric binary system, eta Carinae, underwent a periastron passage in the summer of 2014. We obtained two coordinated X-ray observations with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR during the elevated X-ray flux state and just before the X-ray minimum flux state around this passage. These NuSTAR observations clearly detected X-ray emission associated with eta Car extending up to ~50 keV for the first time. The NuSTAR spectrum above 10 keV can be fit with the bremsstrahlung tail from a kT ~6 keV plasma. This temperature is Delta kT ~2 keV higher than those measured from the iron K emission line complex, if the shocked gas is in collisional ionization equilibrium. This result may suggest that the companion star's pre-shock wind velocity is underestimated. The NuSTAR observation near the X-ray minimum state showed a gradual decline in the X-ray emission by 40% at energies above 5 keV in a day, the largest rate of change of the X-ray flux yet observed in individual eta Car observations. The column density to the hardest emission component, NH ~1e24 cm-2, marked one of the highest values ever observed for eta Car, strongly suggesting increased obscuration of the wind-wind colliding X-ray emission by the thick primary stellar wind prior to superior conjunction. Neither observation detected the power-law component in the extremely hard band that INTEGRAL and Suzaku observed prior to 2011. If the non-detection by NuSTAR is caused by absorption, the power-law source must be small and located very near the WWC apex. Alternatively, it may be that the power-law source is not related to either eta Car or the GeV gamma-ray source.
  • Colliding Wolf-Rayet (WR) winds produce thermal X-ray emission widely observed by X-ray telescopes. In wide WR+O binaries, such as WR 140, the X-ray flux is tied to the orbital phase, and is a direct probe of the winds' properties. In the Galactic center, $\sim$30 WRs orbit the super massive black hole (SMBH) within $\sim$10", leading to a smorgasbord of wind-wind collisions. To model the X-ray emission of WR 140 and the Galactic center, we perform 3D hydrodynamic simulations to trace the complex gaseous flows, and then carry out 3D radiative transfer calculations to compute the variable X-ray spectra. The model WR 140 RXTE light curve matches the data well for all phases except the X-ray minimum associated with periastron, while the model spectra agree with the RXTE hardness ratio and the shape of the Suzaku observations throughout the orbit. The Galactic center model of the Chandra flux and spectral shape match well in the region r$<$3", but the model flux falls off too rapidly beyond this radius.
  • The multiple star system of delta Orionis is one of the closest examples of a system containing a luminous O-type, bright giant star (component Aa1). It is often used as a spectral-type standard and has the highest observed X-ray flux of any hot-star binary. The main component Aa1 is orbited by two lower mass stars, faint Aa2 in a 5.7 day eclipsing binary, and Ab, an astrometric companion with an estimated period of 346 years. Generally the flux from all three stars is recorded in ground-based spectroscopy, and the spectral decomposition of the components has proved difficult. Here we present HST/STIS ultraviolet spectroscopy of delta Ori A that provides us with spatially separated spectra of Aa and Ab for the first time. We measured radial velocities for Aa1 and Ab in two observations made near the velocity extrema of Aa1. We show tentative evidence for the detection of the Aa2 component in cross-correlation functions of the observed and model spectra. We discuss the appearance of the UV spectra of Aa1 and Ab with reference to model spectra. Both stars have similar effective temperatures, but Ab is fainter and is a rapid rotator. The results will help in the interpretation of ground-based spectroscopy and in understanding the physical and evolutionary parameters of these massive stars.
  • We present results from a study of the eclipsing, colliding-wind binary V444 Cyg that uses a combination of X-ray and optical spectropolarimetric methods to describe the 3-D nature of the shock and wind structure within the system. We have created the most complete X-ray light curve of V444 Cyg to date using 40 ksec of new data from Swift, and 200 ksec of new and archived XMM-Newton observations. In addition, we have characterized the intrinsic, polarimetric phase-dependent behavior of the strongest optical emission lines using data obtained with the University of Wisconsin's Half-Wave Spectropolarimeter. We have detected evidence of the Coriolis distortion of the wind-wind collision in the X-ray regime, which manifests itself through asymmetric behavior around the eclipses in the system's X-ray light curves. The large opening angle of the X-ray emitting region, as well as its location (i.e. the WN wind does not collide with the O star, but rather its wind) are evidence of radiative braking/inhibition occurring within the system. Additionally, the polarimetric results show evidence of the cavity the wind-wind collision region carves out of the Wolf-Rayet star's wind.
  • The Suzaku X-ray observatory monitored the supermassive binary system Eta Carinae 10 times during the whole 5.5 year orbital cycle between 2005-2011. This series of observations presents the first long-term monitoring of this enigmatic system in the extremely hard X-ray band between 15-40 keV. During most of the orbit, the 15-25 keV emission varied similarly to the 2-10 keV emission, indicating an origin in the hard energy tail of the kT ~4 keV wind-wind collision (WWC) plasma. However, the 15-25 keV emission declined only by a factor of 3 around periastron when the 2-10 keV emission dropped by two orders of magnitude due probably to an eclipse of the WWC plasma. The observed minimum in the 15-25 keV emission occurred after the 2-10 keV flux had already recovered by a factor of ~3. This may mean that the WWC activity was strong, but hidden behind the thick primary stellar wind during the eclipse. The 25-40 keV flux was rather constant through the orbital cycle, at the level measured with INTEGRAL in 2004. This result may suggest a connection of this flux component to the gamma-ray source detected in this field. The Helium-like Fe Kalpha line complex at ~6.7 keV became strongly distorted toward periastron as seen in the previous cycle. The 5-9 keV spectra can be reproduced well with a two-component spectral model, which includes plasma in collision equilibrium (CE) and a plasma in non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) with tau ~1e11 cm-3 s-1. The NEI plasma increases in importance toward periastron.
  • Colliding wind binaries (CWBs) are unique laboratories for X-ray astrophysics. The massive stars in these systems possess powerful stellar winds with speeds up to $\sim$3000 km s$^{-1}$, and their collision leads to hot plasma (up to $\sim10^8$K) that emit thermal X-rays (up to $\sim$10 keV). Many X-ray telescopes have observed CWBs, including Suzaku, and our work aims to model these X-ray observations. We use 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to model the wind-wind interaction, and then perform 3D radiative transfer to compute the emergent X-ray flux, which is folded through X-ray telescopes' response functions to compare directly with observations. In these proceedings, we present our models of Suzaku observations of the multi-year-period, highly eccentric systems $\eta$ Carinae and WR 140. The models reproduce the observations well away from periastron passage, but only $\eta$ Carinae's X-ray spectrum is reproduced at periastron; the WR 140 model produces too much flux during this more complicated phase.
  • X-ray emission from the supermassive binary system Eta Carinae declines sharply around periastron. This X-ray minimum has two distinct phases - the lowest flux phase in the first ~3 weeks and a brighter phase thereafter. In 2009, the Chandra X-ray Observatory monitored the first phase five times and found the lowest observed flux at ~1.9e-12 ergs cm-2 s-1 (3-8 keV). The spectral shape changed such that the hard band above ~4 keV dropped quickly at the beginning and the soft band flux gradually decreased to its lowest observed value in ~2 weeks. The hard band spectrum had begun to recover by that time. This spectral variation suggests that the shocked gas producing the hottest X-ray gas near the apex of the wind-wind collision (WWC) is blocked behind the dense inner wind of the primary star, which later occults slightly cooler gas downstream. Shocked gas previously produced by the system at earlier orbital phases is suggested to produce the faint residual X-ray emission seen when the emission near the apex is completely blocked by the primary wind. The brighter phase is probably caused by the re-appearance of the WWC plasma, whose emissivity significantly declined during the occultation. We interpret this to mean that the X-ray minimum is produced by a hybrid mechanism of an occultation and a decline in emissivity of the WWC shock.
  • Recent work suggests that the mass-loss rate of the primary star (Eta A) in the massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae dropped by a factor of 2-3 between 1999 and 2010. We present results from large- (r=1545au) and small- (r=155au) domain, 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's colliding winds for 3 Eta A mass-loss rates (2.4, 4.8, and 8.5 x 10^-4 M_sun/yr), investigating the effects on the dynamics of the binary wind-wind collision (WWC). These simulations include orbital motion, optically thin radiative cooling, and radiative forces. We find that Eta A's mass-loss rate greatly affects the time-dependent hydrodynamics at all spatial scales investigated. The simulations also show that the post-shock wind of the companion star (Eta B) switches from the adiabatic to the radiative-cooling regime during periastron passage. The SPH simulations together with 1D radiative transfer models of Eta A's spectra reveal that a factor of 2 or more drop in Eta A's mass-loss rate should lead to substantial changes in numerous multiwavelength observables. Recent observations are not fully consistent with the model predictions, indicating that any drop in Eta A's mass-loss rate was likely by a factor < 2 and occurred after 2004. We speculate that most of the recent observed changes in Eta Car are due to a small increase in the WWC opening angle that produces significant effects because our line-of-sight to the system lies close to the dense walls of the WWC zone. A modest decrease in Eta A's mass-loss rate may be responsible, but changes in the wind/stellar parameters of Eta B cannot yet be fully ruled out. We suggest observations during Eta Car's next periastron in 2014 to further test for decreases in Eta A's mass-loss rate. If Eta A's mass-loss rate is declining and continues to do so, the 2014 X-ray minimum should be even shorter than that of 2009.
  • Using XMM data, we study for the first time the X-ray emission of HM1 and IC2944/2948. Low-mass, pre-main-sequence objects with an age of a few Myr are detected, as well as a few background or foreground objects. Most massive stars in both clusters display the usual high-energy properties of that type of objects, though with log(Lx/Lbol) apparently lower in HM1 than in IC2944/2948. Compared with studies of other clusters, it seems that a low signal-to-noise ratio at soft energies, due to the high extinction, may be the main cause of this difference. In HM1, the two Wolf-Rayet stars show contrasting behaviors: WR89 is extremely bright, but much softer than WR87. It remains to be seen whether wind-wind collisions or magnetically confined winds can explain these emissions. In IC2944/2948, the X-ray sources concentrate around HD101205; a group of massive stars to the north of this object is isolated, suggesting that there exist two subclusters in the field-of-view.
  • We report new HST/STIS observations that map the high-ionization forbidden line emission in the inner arcsecond of Eta Car, the first that fully image the extended wind-wind interaction region of the massive colliding wind binary. These observations were obtained after the 2009.0 periastron at orbital phases 0.084, 0.163, and 0.323 of the 5.54-year spectroscopic cycle. We analyze the variations in brightness and morphology of the emission, and find that blue-shifted emission (-400 to -200 km s-1) is symmetric and elongated along the northeast-southwest axis, while the red-shifted emission (+100 to +200 km s-1) is asymmetric and extends to the north- northwest. Comparison to synthetic images generated from a 3-D dynamical model strengthens the 3-D orbital orientation found by Madura et al. (2011), with an inclination i \approx 138\degree, argument of periapsis {\omega} \approx 270\degree, and an orbital axis that is aligned at the same PA on the sky as the symmetry axis of the Homunculus, 312\degree. We discuss the potential that these and future mappings have for constraining the stellar parameters of the companion star and the long-term variability of the system.
  • The colliding wind binary (CWB) systems \eta\ Carinae and WR140 provide unique laboratories for X-ray astrophysics. Their wind-wind collisions produce hard X-rays that have been monitored extensively by several X-ray telescopes, including RXTE. To interpret these X-ray light curves and spectra, we apply 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the wind-wind collision using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), with the recent improvements of radiative cooling and the acceleration of the stellar winds according to a \beta\ law. For both systems, the 2-10 keV RXTE light curves are well-reproduced in absolute units for most phases, but the light curve dips associated with the periastron passages are not well matched. In WR140, the dip is too weak, and in \eta\ Carinae, the large difference in wind speeds of the two stars leads to a hot, post-periastron bubble that produces excess emission toward the end of the X-ray minimum.
  • The colliding wind binary (CWB) systems \eta\ Carinae and WR140 provide unique laboratories for X-ray astrophysics. Their wind-wind collisions produce hard X-rays that have been monitored extensively by several X-ray telescopes, including RXTE. To interpret these RXTE X-ray light curves, we model the wind-wind collision using 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations. Adiabatic simulations that account for the absorption of X-rays from an assumed point source at the apex of the wind-collision shock cone by the distorted winds can closely match the observed 2-10keV RXTE light curves of both \eta\ Car and WR140. This point-source model can also explain the early recovery of \eta\ Car's X-ray light curve from the 2009.0 minimum by a factor of 2-4 reduction in the mass loss rate of \eta\ Car. Our more recent models relax the point-source approximation and account for the spatially extended emission along the wind-wind interaction shock front. For WR140, the computed X-ray light curve again matches the RXTE observations quite well. But for \eta\ Car, a hot, post-periastron bubble leads to an emission level that does not match the extended X-ray minimum observed by RXTE. Initial results from incorporating radiative cooling and radiatively-driven wind acceleration via a new anti-gravity approach into the SPH code are also discussed.
  • The Chandra Carina Complex contains 200 known O- and B type stars. The Chandra survey detected 68 of the 70 O stars and 61 of 127 known B0-B3 stars. We have assembled a publicly available optical/X-ray database to identify OB stars that depart from the canonical Lx/Lbol relation, or whose average X-ray temperatures exceed 1 keV. Among the single O stars with high kT we identify two candidate magnetically confined wind shock sources: Tr16-22, O8.5 V, and LS 1865, O8.5 V((f)). The O4 III(fc) star HD 93250 exhibits strong, hard, variable X-rays, suggesting it may be a massive binary with a period of >30 days. The visual O2 If* binary HD 93129A shows soft 0.6 keV and hard 1.9 keV emission components, suggesting embedded wind shocks close to the O2 If* Aa primary, and colliding wind shocks between Aa and Ab. Of the 11 known O-type spectroscopic binaries, the long orbital-period systems HD 93343, HD 93403 and QZ Car have higher shock temperatures than short-period systems such as HD 93205 and FO 15. Although the X-rays from most B stars may be produced in the coronae of unseen, low-mass pre-main-sequence companions, a dozen B stars with high Lx cannot be explained by a distribution of unseen companions. One of these, SS73 24 in the Treasure Chest cluster, is a new candidate Herbig Be star.
  • The Great Nebula in Carina provides an exceptional view into the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant HII regions and starburst galaxies. We have mapped the Carina star-forming complex in X-rays, using archival Chandra data and a mosaic of 20 new 60ks pointings using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, as a testbed for understanding recent and ongoing star formation and to probe Carina's regions of bright diffuse X-ray emission. This study has yielded a catalog of properties of >14,000 X-ray point sources; >9800 of them have multiwavelength counterparts. Using Chandra's unsurpassed X-ray spatial resolution, we have separated these point sources from the extensive, spatially-complex diffuse emission that pervades the region; X-ray properties of this diffuse emission suggest that it traces feedback from Carina's massive stars. In this introductory paper, we motivate the survey design, describe the Chandra observations, and present some simple results, providing a foundation for the 15 papers that follow in this Special Issue and that present detailed catalogs, methods, and science results.
  • We observed the massive binary stellar system of Eta Carinae in the 0.3-10 keV energy range with the X-ray Telescope onboard the Swift satellite during the period 15 December 2008 - 11 March 2009, i.e. 1 month before to 2 months after the X-ray drop from maximum to minimum, thought to be associated with the periastron encounter of the primary star by the hot companion. Beginning a few months before eclipse, the interaction between the winds of the two stars intensifies and the X-ray flux reaches maximum. The flux drops dramatically thereafter, subsiding in about 20 days to a level that is at least a factor 10 lower than the 'high state', i.e. the X-ray emission state of the system during the largest fraction of its 5.52 yr orbit (~e-11 erg/s/cm2). Unlike in previous cycles, when the low state lasted about 2.5 months, observations with RXTE showed that the X-ray flux started its recovery to normal level about 1.5 months after the minimum. We suggest that this early recovery may be due to the fact that the companion wind reaches terminal velocity before encountering the shock.
  • The Carina Nebula is one of the youngest, most active sites of massive star formation in our Galaxy. In this nebula, we have discovered a bright X-ray source that has persisted for ~30 years. The soft X-ray spectrum, consistent with kT ~128 eV blackbody radiation with mild extinction, and no counterpart in the near- and mid-infrared wavelengths indicate that it is a ~1e6-year-old neutron star housed in the Carina Nebula. Current star formation theory does not suggest that the progenitor of the neutron star and massive stars in the Carina Nebula, in particular Eta Carinae, are coeval. This result suggests that the Carina Nebula experienced at least two major episodes of massive star formation. The neutron star may be responsible for remnants of high energy activity seen in multiple wavelengths.
  • The eastern tip region of the Carina Nebula was observed with the Suzaku XIS for 77 ks to conduct a high-precision spectral study of extended X-ray emission. XMM-Newton EPIC data of this region were also utilized to detect point sources. The XIS detected strong extended X-ray emission from the entire field-of-view with a 0.2--5 keV flux of $0.7\sim4\times10^{-14}$ erg s$^{-1}$ arcmin$^{-2}$. The emission has a blob-like structure that coincides with an ionized gas filament observed in mid-infrared images. Contributions of astrophysical backgrounds and the detected point sources were insignificant. Thus the emission is diffuse in nature. The X-ray spectrum of the diffuse emission was represented by a two-temperature plasma model with temperatures of 0.3 and 0.6 keV and an absorption column density of 2$\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-1}$. The X-ray emission showed normal nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratios and a high iron-to-oxygen abundance ratio. The spectrally deduced parameters, such as temperatures and column densities, are common to the diffuse X-ray emission near $\eta$ Car. Thus, the diffuse X-ray emission in these two fields may have the same origin. The spectral fitting results are discussed to constrain the origin in the context of stellar winds and supernovae.
  • Using a sub-pixel event repositioning technique, we spatially resolved X-ray emission from the infrared double system IRS 5 in the R Corona Australis molecular cloud with ~0.8" separation. As far as we know, this result - obtained from 8 Chandra archival observations between 2000 and 2005 - is the first X-ray study of individual sources in a Class I protostar binary system with a projected separation of less than 200 AU. We extracted light curves and spectra of the individual sources using a two-dimensional image fitting method. IRS 5a at the south, the source which was brighter in the near-infrared, showed three X-ray flares lasting >20 ksec, reminiscent of X-ray flares from pre-main sequence stars, while the northern source (IRS 5b) was quiescent in X-rays in all the observations except for a 2005 August 9 observation with a factor of ~2 flux enhancement. In quiescence, these sources showed almost identical X-ray spectra, with NH ~4e22 cm-2, kT ~2 keV, and log Lx ~30.2-3 ergs s-1. IRS 5a showed plasma at temperatures up to kT ~5-6 keV during flares, while the column density of IRS 5b increased by a factor of 2 during an observation on 2005 August 9. We discuss the evolutionary stages and variation of the X-ray activity of these sources.
  • We study colliding winds in the superluminous binary eta Carinae by performing three-dimensional, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations. For simplicity, we assume both winds to be isothermal. We also assume that wind particles coast without any net external forces. We find that the lower density, faster wind from the secondary carves out a spiral cavity in the higher density, slower wind from the primary. Because of the phase-dependent orbital motion, the cavity is very thin on the periastron side, whereas it occupies a large volume on the apastron side. The model X-ray light curve using the simulated density structure fits very well with the observed light curve for a viewing angle of i=54 degrees and phi=36 degrees, where i is the inclination angle and phi is the azimuth from apastron.
  • We report the results of an X-ray observing campaign on the massive, evolved star Eta Carinae, concentrating on the 2003 X-ray minimum as seen by the XMM-Newton observatory. These are the first spatially-resolved X-ray monitoring observations of the stellar X-ray spectrum during the minimum. The hard X-ray emission, believed to be associated with the collision of Eta Carinae's wind with the wind from a massive companion star, varied strongly in flux on timescales of days, but not significantly on timescales of hours. The lowest X-ray flux in the 2-10 keV band seen by XMM-Newton was only 0.7% of the maximum seen by RXTE just before the X-ray minimum. The slope of the X-ray continuum above 5 keV did not vary in any observation, which suggests that the electron temperature of the hottest plasma associated with the stellar source did not vary significantly at any phase. Through the minimum, the absorption to the stellar source increased by a factor of 5-10 to NH ~3-4E23 cm-2. The thermal Fe XXV emission line showed significant excesses on both the red and blue sides of the line outside the minimum and exhibited an extreme red excess during the minimum. The Fe fluorescence line at 6.4 keV increased in equivalent width from 100 eV outside the minimum to 200 eV during the minimum. From these observed features, we discuss two possible causes of the X-ray minimum; the eclipse of the X-ray plasma and an intrinsic fading of the X-ray emissivity. The drop in the colliding wind X-ray emission also revealed the presence of an additional X-ray component which exhibited no variation on timescales of weeks to years. This component may be produced by the collision of high speed outflows at v \~1000-2000 km s-1 from Eta Carinae with ambient gas within a few thousand AU from the star.
  • With the XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories, we detected two extremely embedded X-ray sources in the R Corona Australis (R CrA) star forming core, near IRS 7. These sources, designated as XB and XA, have X-ray absorption columns of ~3e23 cm-2 equivalent to AV ~180 mag. They are associated with the VLA centimeter radio sources 10E and 10W, respectively. XA is the counterpart of the near-infrared source IRS 7, whereas XB has no K-band counterpart above 19.4 mag. This indicates that XB is younger than typical Class I protostars, probably a Class 0 protostar or in an intermediate phase between Class 0 and Class I. The X-ray luminosity of XB varied between 29<log LX <31.2 ergs s-1 on timescales of 3-30 months. XB also showed a monotonic increase in X-ray brightness by a factor of two in 30 ksec during an XMM-Newton observation. The XMM-Newton spectra indicate emission from a hot plasma with kT ~3-4 keV and also show fluorescent emission from cold iron. Though the X-ray spectrum from XB is similar to flare spectra from Class I protostars in luminosity and temperature, the light curve does not resemble the lightcurves of magnetically generated X-ray flares because the variability timescale of XB is too long and because variations in X-ray count rate were not accompanied by variations in spectral hardness. The short-term variation of XB may be caused by the partial blocking of the X-ray plasma, while the month-long flux enhancement may be driven by mass accretion.
  • The observational picture of the enigmatic O-type spectrum variable HD191612 has been sharpened substantially. A symmetrical, low-amplitude light curve with a period near 540 d has recently been reported from Hipparcos photometry. This period satisfies all of the spectroscopy since at least 1982, including extensive new observations during 2003 and 2004, and it has predicted the next transition during September--October 2004. Measurements of the H alpha equivalent width reveal a sharp emission peak in the phase diagram, in contrast to the apparently sinusoidal light curve. The He II absorption-line strength is essentially constant, while He I varies strongly, possibly filled in by emission in the O6 state, thus producing the apparent spectral-type variations. The O8 state appears to be the "normal" one. Two intermediate O7 observations have been obtained, which fall at the expected phases, but these are the only modern observations of the transitions so far. The period is too long for rotation or pulsation; although there is no direct evidence as yet for a companion, a model in which tidally induced oscillations drive an enhanced wind near periastron of an eccentric orbit appears promising. Further observations during the now predictable transitions may provide a critical test. Ultraviolet and X-ray observations during both states will likely also prove illuminating.