• Humans possess the capability to reason at an abstract level and to structure information into abstract categories, but the underlying neural processes have remained unknown. Experimental evidence has recently emerged for the organization of an important aspect of abstract reasoning: for assigning words to semantic roles in a sentence, such as agent (or subject) and patient (or object). Using minimal assumptions, we show how such a binding of words to semantic roles emerges in a generic spiking neural network through Hebbian plasticity. The resulting model is consistent with the experimental data and enables new computational functionalities such as structured information retrieval, copying data, and comparisons. It thus provides a basis for the implementation of more demanding cognitive computations by networks of spiking neurons.
  • This paper documents the winning entry at the CVPR2017 vehicle velocity estimation challenge. Velocity estimation is an emerging task in autonomous driving which has not yet been thoroughly explored. The goal is to estimate the relative velocity of a specific vehicle from a sequence of images. In this paper, we present a light-weight approach for directly regressing vehicle velocities from their trajectories using a multilayer perceptron. Another contribution is an explorative study of features for monocular vehicle velocity estimation. We find that light-weight trajectory based features outperform depth and motion cues extracted from deep ConvNets, especially for far-distance predictions where current disparity and optical flow estimators are challenged significantly. Our light-weight approach is real-time capable on a single CPU and outperforms all competing entries in the velocity estimation challenge. On the test set, we report an average error of 1.12 m/s which is comparable to a (ground-truth) system that combines LiDAR and radar techniques to achieve an error of around 0.71 m/s.