• Using electrical detection of a strongly coupled spin-photon system comprised of a microwave cavity mode and two magnetic samples, we demonstrate the long distance manipulation of spin currents. This distant control is not limited by the spin diffusion length, instead depending on the interplay between the local and global properties of the coupled system, enabling systematic spin current control over large distance scales (several centimeters in this work). This flexibility opens the door to improved spin current generation and manipulation for cavity spintronic devices.
  • We experimentally examine the topological nature of a strongly coupled spin-photon system induced by damping. The presence of both spin and photonic losses results in a non-Hermitian system with a variety of exotic phenomena dictated by the topological structure of the eigenvalue spectra and the presence of an exceptional point (EP), where the coupled spin-photon eigenvectors coalesce. By controlling both the spin resonance frequency and the spin-photon coupling strength we observe a resonance crossing for cooperativities above one, suggesting that the boundary between weak and strong coupling should be based on the EP location rather than the cooperativity. Furthermore we observe dynamic mode switching when encircling the EP and identify the potential to engineer the topological structure of coupled spin-photon systems with additional modes. Our work therefore further highlights the role of damping within the strong coupling regime, and demonstrates the potential and great flexibility of spin-photon systems for studies of non-Hermitian physics.
  • Strong coupling in cavity-magnon systems has shown great potential for use in spintronics and information processing technologies due to the low damping rates and long coherence times. Although such systems are conceptually similar to those coupled by magnon-polaritons (MPs), the link between magnon-cavity coupling and MPs has not been explicitly defined. In this work we establish such a connection by studying the frequency-wavevector dispersion of a strongly coupled magnon-cavity system, using a height-adjustable microwave cavity, and by modelling the observed behaviour through the system's effective permeability. A polariton gap between the upper and lower coupled modes of the magnon-cavity system is defined, and is seen to be dependent on the system's effective filling factor. This gap is equal to the MP polariton gap in the limit where filling factor = 1, corresponding to the removal of the microwave cavity. Thus, our work clarifies the connection between magnon-cavity and MP coupling, improving our understanding of magnon-photon interactions in coupled systems.
  • The purpose of this article is to review the current status of a frontier in dynamic spintronics and contemporary magnetism, in which much progress has been made in the past decade, based on the creation of a variety of micro- and nano-structured devices that enable electrical detection of magnetization dynamics. The primary focus is on the physics of spin rectification effects, which are well suited for studying magnetization dynamics and spin transport in a variety of magnetic materials and spintronic devices. Intended to be intelligible to a broad audience, the paper begins with a pedagogical introduction, comparing the methods of electrical detection of charge and spin dynamics in semiconductors and magnetic materials respectively. After that it provides a comprehensive account of the theoretical study of both the angular dependence and line shape of electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), which is summarized in a handbook formate easy to be used for analyzing experimental data. We then review and examine the similarity and differences of various spin rectification effects found in ferromagnetic films, magnetic bilayers and magnetic tunnel junctions, including a discussion of how to properly distinguish spin rectification from the spin pumping/inverse spin Hall effect generated voltage. After this we review the broad applications of rectification effects for studying spin waves, nonlinear dynamics, domain wall dynamics, spin current, and microwave imaging. We also discuss spin rectification in ferromagnetic semiconductors. The paper concludes with both historical and future perspectives, by summarizing and comparing three generations of FMR spectroscopy which have been developed for studying magnetization dynamics.
  • We experimentally realize indirect coupling between two cavity modes via strong coupling with the ferromagnetic resonance in Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG). We find that some indirectly coupled modes of our system can have a higher microwave transmission than the individual uncoupled modes. Using a coupled harmonic oscillator model, the influence of the oscillation phase difference between the two cavity modes on the nature of the indirect coupling is revealed. These indirectly coupled microwave modes can be controlled using an external magnetic field or by tuning the cavity height. This work has potential for use in controllable optical devices and information processing technologies.
  • We experimentally studied a strongly coupled magnon-photon system via microwave transmission measurements. An anti-resonance, i.e. the suppression of the microwave transmission, is observed, indicating a relative phase change between the magnon response and the driving microwave field. We show that this anti-resonance feature can be used to interpret the phase evolution of the coupled magnon-microwave system and apply this technique to reveal the phase evolution of magnon dark modes. Our work provides a standard procedure for the phase analysis of strongly coupled systems, enabling the phase characterization of each subsystem, and can be generally applied to other strongly coupled systems.
  • We experimentally and theoretically investigate the microwave transmission line shape of the cavity-magnon-polariton (CMP) created by inserting a low damping magnetic insulator into a high quality 3D microwave cavity. While fixed field measurements are found to have the expected Lorentzian characteristic, at fixed frequencies the field swept line shape is in general asymmetric. Such fixed frequency measurements demonstrate that microwave transmission can be used to access magnetic characteristics of the CMP, such as the field line width $\Delta H$. By developing an effective oscillator model of the microwave transmission we show that these line shape features are general characteristics of harmonic coupling. At the same time, at the classical level the underlying physical mechanism of the CMP is electrodynamic phase correlation and a second model based on this principle also accurately reproduces the experimental line shape features. In order to understand the microscopic origin of the effective coupled oscillator model and to allow for future studies of CMP phenomena to extend into the quantum regime, we develop a third, microscopic description, based on a Green's function formalism. Using this method we calculate the transmission spectra and find good agreement with the experimental results.
  • We experimentally investigate magnon-polaritons, arising in ferrimagnetic resonance experiments in a microwave cavity with a tuneable quality factor. To his end, we simultaneously measure the electrically detected spin pumping signal and microwave reflection (the ferrimagnetic resonance signal) of a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) / platinum (Pt) bilayer in the microwave cavity. The coupling strength of the fundamental magnetic resonance mode and the cavity is determined from the microwave reflection data. All features of the magnetic resonance spectra predicted by first principle calculations and an input-output formalism agree with our experimental observations. By changing the decay rate of the cavity at constant magnon-photon coupling rate, we experimentally tune in and out of the strong coupling regime and successfully model the corresponding change of the spin pumping signal. Furthermore, we observe the coupling and spin pumping of several spin wave modes and provide a quantitative analysis of their coupling rates to the cavity.
  • We discuss a real-time generating functional for correlation functions in dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics which takes into account thermal fluctuations of the hydrodynamic variables. Starting from the known form of these correlation functions in the linearized regime, we integrate to find a generating functional which we can interpret within the CTP formalism, provided the space-time and internal global symmetries are realized in a specific manner in the (r,a) sectors. We then verify that this symmetry realization, when implemented in an effective action for hydrodynamic fields in the (r,a) basis, leads to a consistent derivative expansion for the constitutive relations at the nonlinear level, modulo constraints associated with the existence of an equilibrium state.
  • We give the maximal distance between a copula and itself when the argument is permuted for arbitrary dimension, generalizing a result for dimension two by Nelsen (2007), Klement and Mesiar (2006). Furthermore, we establish a subset of $[0,1]^d$ in which this bound might be attained. For each point in this subset we present a copula and a permutation, for which the distance in this point is maximal. In the process, we see that this subset depends on the dimension being even or odd.