• Project Blue is designed to deliver a small coronagraphic space telescope mission to low-Earth orbit capable of detecting an Earth-like planet in the habitable zones of the Sun-like stars Alpha Centauri A and B within the next 4 years within a Mission of Opportunity budget envelope. The concept heavily leverages emerging commercial capabilities -- including the telescope optics, spacecraft bus and launch vehicle -- and emphasizes a public-private partnership approach.
  • We have demonstrated a remote magnetometer based on sodium atoms in the Earth's mesosphere, at a 106-kilometer distance from our instrument. A 1.33-watt laser illuminated the atoms, and the magnetic field was inferred from back-scattered light collected by a telescope with a 1.55-meter-diameter aperture. The measurement sensitivity was 162 nT/$\sqrt{Hz}$. The value of magnetic field inferred from our measurement is consistent with an estimate based on the Earth's known field shape to within a fraction of a percent. Projected improvements in optics could lead to sensitivity of 20 nT/$\sqrt{Hz}$, and the use of advanced lasers or a large telescope could approach 1-nT/$\sqrt{Hz}$ sensitivity. All experimental and theoretical sensitivity values are based on a 60$^\circ$ angle between the laser beam axis and the magnetic field vector; at the optimal 90$^\circ$ angle sensitivity would be improved by about a factor of two.
  • We describe results from the first astronomical adaptive optics system to use multiple laser guide stars, located at the 6.5-m MMT telescope in Arizona. Its initial operational mode, ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO), provides uniform stellar wavefront correction within the 2 arc minute diameter laser beacon constellation, reducing the stellar image widths by as much as 53%, from 0.70 to 0.33 arc seconds at lambda = 2.14 microns. GLAO is achieved by applying a correction to the telescope's adaptive secondary mirror that is an average of wavefront measurements from five laser beacons supplemented with image motion from a faint stellar source. Optimization of the adaptive optics system in subsequent commissioning runs will further improve correction performance where it is predicted to deliver 0.1 to 0.2 arc second resolution in the near-infrared during a majority of seeing conditions.
  • We address the important practical issue of understanding, predicting and eventually controlling catastrophic endogenous changes in a collective. Such large internal changes arise as macroscopic manifestations of the microscopic dynamics, and their presence can be regarded as one of the defining features of an evolving complex system. We consider the specific case of a multi-agent system related to the El Farol bar model, and show explicitly how the information concerning such large macroscopic changes becomes encoded in the microscopic dynamics. Our findings suggest that these large endogenous changes can be avoided either by pre-design of the collective machinery itself, or in the post-design stage via continual monitoring and occasional `vaccinations'.
  • We explore various extensions of Challet and Zhang's Minority Game in an attempt to gain insight into the dynamics underlying financial markets. First we consider a heterogeneous population where individual traders employ differing `time horizons' when making predictions based on historical data. The resulting average winnings per trader is a highly non-linear function of the population's composition. Second, we introduce a threshold confidence level among traders below which they will not trade. This can give rise to large fluctuations in the `volume' of market participants and the resulting market `price'.
  • We present analytic and numerical results for two models, namely the minority model and the bar-attendance model, which offer simple paradigms for a competitive marketplace. Both models feature heterogeneous agents with bounded rationality who act using inductive reasoning. We find that the effects of crowding are crucial to the understanding of the macroscopic fluctuations, or `volatility', in the resulting dynamics of these systems.