• Stellar mass has been shown to correlate with halo mass, with non-negligible scatter. The stellar mass-size and luminosity-size relationships of galaxies also show significant scatter in galaxy size at fixed stellar mass. It is possible that, at fixed stellar mass and galaxy colour, the halo mass is correlated with galaxy size. Galaxy-galaxy lensing allows us to measure the mean masses of dark matter haloes for stacked samples of galaxies. We extend the analysis of the galaxies in the CFHTLenS catalogue by fitting single S\'{e}rsic surface brightness profiles to the lens galaxies in order to recover half-light radius values, allowing us to determine halo masses for lenses according to their size. Comparing our halo masses and sizes to baselines for that stellar mass yields a differential measurement of the halo mass-galaxy size relationship at fixed stellar mass, defined as $M_{h}(M_{*}) \propto r_{\mathrm{eff}}^{\eta}(M_{*})$. We find that on average, our lens galaxies have an $\eta = 0.42\pm0.12$, i.e. larger galaxies live in more massive dark matter haloes. The $\eta$ is strongest for high mass luminous red galaxies (LRGs). Investigation of this relationship in hydrodynamical simulations suggests that, at a fixed $M_{*}$, satellite galaxies have a larger $\eta$ and greater scatter in the $M_{\mathrm{h}}$ and $r_{\mathrm{eff}}$ relationship compared to central galaxies.
  • We describe a new Large Program in progress on the Gemini North and South telescopes: Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments (GOGREEN). This is an imaging and deep spectroscopic survey of 21 galaxy systems at $1<z<1.5$, selected to span a factor $>10$ in halo mass. The scientific objectives include measuring the role of environment in the evolution of low-mass galaxies, and measuring the dynamics and stellar contents of their host haloes. The targets are selected from the SpARCS, SPT, COSMOS and SXDS surveys, to be the evolutionary counterparts of today's clusters and groups. The new red-sensitive Hamamatsu detectors on GMOS, coupled with the nod-and-shuffle sky subtraction, allow simultaneous wavelength coverage over $\lambda\sim 0.6$--$1.05\mu$m, and this enables a homogeneous and statistically complete redshift survey of galaxies of all types. The spectroscopic sample targets galaxies with AB magnitudes $z^{\prime}<24.25$ and [3.6]$\mu$m$<22.5$, and is therefore statistically complete for stellar masses $M_\ast\gtrsim10^{10.3}M_\odot$, for all galaxy types and over the entire redshift range. Deep, multiwavelength imaging has been acquired over larger fields for most systems, spanning $u$ through $K$, in addition to deep IRAC imaging at 3.6$\mu$m. The spectroscopy is $\sim 50$ per cent complete as of semester 17A, and we anticipate a final sample of $\sim 500$ new cluster members. Combined with existing spectroscopy on the brighter galaxies from GCLASS, SPT and other sources, GOGREEN will be a large legacy cluster and field galaxy sample at this redshift that spectroscopically covers a wide range in stellar mass, halo mass, and clustercentric radius.
  • We present measurements of star formation rates (SFRs) for dwarf galaxies (M*~10^8.5 Msun ) at z~1 using near-infrared slitless spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by targetting and measuring the luminosity of the H{\alpha} emission line. Our sample is derived from the Redshift One LDSS3 Emission Line Survey (ROLES), which used [O II]{\lambda} 3727 as a tracer of star formation to target very low stellar masses down to very low SFRs (~0.1 Msun yr^-1) at this epoch. Dust corrections are estimated using SED-fits and we find, by comparison with other studies using Balmer decrement dust corrections, that we require a smaller ratio between the gas phase and stellar extinction than the nominal Calzetti relation, in agreement with recent findings by other studies. By stacking the WFC3 spectra at the redshifts obtained from ground-based [O II] detections, we are able to push the WFC3 spectra to much lower SFRs and obtain the most complete spectroscopic measurement of the low mass end of the SSFR--mass relation to date. We measure a flatter low mass power law slope (-0.47 +/- 0.04) than found by other (shallower) H{\alpha}-selected samples (\approx -1), although still somewhat steeper than that predicted by the EAGLE simulation (-0.14 +/- 0.05), hinting at possible missing physics not modelled by EAGLE or remaining incompleteness for our H{\alpha} data.
  • We present an analysis of galaxies in groups and clusters at $0.8<z<1.2$, from the GCLASS and GEEC2 spectroscopic surveys. We compute a "conversion fraction" $f_{\rm convert}$ that represents the fraction of galaxies that were prematurely quenched by their environment. For massive galaxies, $M_{\rm star}>10^{10.3}M_\odot$, we find $f_{\rm convert}\sim 0.4$ in the groups and $\sim 0.6$ in the clusters, similar to comparable measurements at $z=0$. This means the time between first accretion into a more massive halo and final star formation quenching is $t_p\sim 2$ Gyr. This is substantially longer than the estimated time required for a galaxy's star formation rate to become zero once it starts to decline, suggesting there is a long delay time during which little differential evolution occurs. In contrast with local observations we find evidence that this delay timescale may depend on stellar mass, with $t_p$ approaching $t_{\rm Hubble}$ for $M_{\rm star}\sim 10^{9.5}M_\odot$. The result suggests that the delay time must not only be much shorter than it is today, but may also depend on stellar mass in a way that is not consistent with a simple evolution in proportion to the dynamical time. Instead, we find the data are well-matched by a model in which the decline in star formation is due to "overconsumption", the exhaustion of a gas reservoir through star formation and expulsion via modest outflows in the absence of cosmological accretion. Dynamical gas removal processes, which are likely dominant in quenching newly accreted satellites today, may play only a secondary role at $z=1$.
  • We study the radial number density and stellar mass density distributions of satellite galaxies in a sample of 60 massive clusters at 0.04<z<0.26 selected from the Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster Survey (MENeaCS) and the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project (CCCP). In addition to ~10,000 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies, we use deep ugri-band imaging to estimate photometric redshifts and stellar masses, and then statistically subtract fore-, and background sources using data from the COSMOS survey. We measure the galaxy number density and stellar mass density distributions in logarithmically spaced bins over 2 orders of magnitude in radial distance from the BCGs. For projected distances in the range 0.1<R/R200<2.0, we find that the stellar mass distribution is well-described by an NFW profile with a concentration of c=2.03+/-0.20. However, at smaller radii we measure a significant excess in the stellar mass in satellite galaxies of about $10^{11}$ Msun per cluster, compared to these NFW profiles. We do obtain good fits to generalized NFW profiles with free inner slopes, and to Einasto profiles. To examine how clusters assemble their stellar mass component over cosmic time, we compare this local sample to the GCLASS cluster sample at z~1, which represents the approximate progenitor sample of the low-z clusters. This allows for a direct comparison, which suggests that the central parts (R<0.4 Mpc) of the stellar mass distributions of satellites in local galaxy clusters are already in place at z~1, and contain sufficient excess material for further BCG growth. Evolving towards z=0, clusters appear to assemble their stellar mass primarily onto the outskirts, making them grow in an inside-out fashion.
  • We present the data release of the Gemini-South GMOS spectroscopy in the fields of 11 galaxy groups at $0.8<z<1$, within the COSMOS field. This forms the basis of the Galaxy Environment Evolution Collaboration 2 (GEEC2) project to study galaxy evolution in haloes with $M\sim 10^{13}M_\odot$ across cosmic time. The final sample includes $162$ spectroscopically--confirmed members with $R<24.75$, and is $>50$ per cent complete for galaxies within the virial radius, and with stellar mass $M_{\rm star}>10^{10.3}M_\odot$. Including galaxies with photometric redshifts we have an effective sample size of $\sim 400$ galaxies within the virial radii of these groups. We present group velocity dispersions, dynamical and stellar masses. Combining with the GCLASS sample of more massive clusters at the same redshift we find the total stellar mass is strongly correlated with the dynamical mass, with $\log{M_{200}}=1.20\left(\log{M_{\rm star}}-12\right)+14.07$. This stellar fraction of $~\sim 1$ per cent is lower than predicted by some halo occupation distribution models, though the weak dependence on halo mass is in good agreement. Most groups have an easily identifiable most massive galaxy (MMG) near the centre of the galaxy distribution, and we present the spectroscopic properties and surface brightness fits to these galaxies. The total stellar mass distribution in the groups, excluding the MMG, compares well with an NFW profile with concentration $4$, for galaxies beyond $\sim 0.2R_{200}$. This is more concentrated than the number density distribution, demonstrating that there is some mass segregation.
  • The baryon cycle of galaxies is a dynamic process involving the intake, consumption and ejection of vast quantities of gas. In contrast, the conventional picture of satellite galaxies has them methodically turning a large gas reservoir into stars until this reservoir is forcibly removed due to external ram pressure. This picture needs revision. Our modern understanding of the baryon cycle suggests that in some regimes the simple interruption of the fresh gas supply may quench satellite galaxies long before stripping events occur, a process we call overconsumption. We compile measurements from the literature of observed satellite quenching times at a range of redshifts to determine if satellites are principally quenched through orbit-based gas stripping events -- either direct stripping of the disk (ram pressure stripping) or the extended gas halo (strangulation) -- or from internally-driven star formation outflows via overconsumption. The observed timescales show significant deviation from the evolution expected for gas stripping mechanisms and suggest that either ram pressure stripping is much more efficient at high redshift, or that secular outflows quench satellites before orbit-based stripping occurs. Given the strong redshift evolution of star formation rates, at high redshift (z > 1.5) even moderate outflow rates will lead to extremely short quenching times with the expectation that such satellites will be quenched almost immediately following the cessation of cosmological inflow, regardless of stripping events. Observations of high redshift satellites give an indirect but sensitive measure of the outflow rate with current measurements suggesting that outflows are no larger than 2.5 times the star formation rate for galaxies with a stellar mass of 10^{10.5} solar masses.
  • We present new analysis from the GEEC2 spectroscopic survey of galaxy groups at $0.8<z<1$. Our previous work revealed an intermediate population between the star-forming and quiescent sequences and a strong environmental dependence in the fraction of quiescent galaxies. Only $\sim5$ per cent of star-forming galaxies in both the group and field sample show a significant enhancement in star formation, which suggests that quenching is the primary process in the transition from the star-forming to the quiescent state. To model the environmental quenching scenario, we have tested the use of different exponential quenching timescales and delays between satellite accretion and the onset of quenching. We find that with no delay, the quenching timescale needs to be long in order to match the observed quiescent fraction, but then this model produces too many intermediate galaxies. Fixing a delay time of 3 Gyr, as suggested from the local universe, produces too few quiescent galaxies. The observed fractions are best matched with a model that includes a delay that is proportional to the dynamical time and a rapid quenching timescale ($\sim0.25$ Gyr), but this model also predicts intermediate galaxies H{\delta} strength higher than that observed. Using stellar synthesis models, we have tested other scenarios, such as the rejuvenation of star formation in early-type galaxies and a portion of quenched galaxies possessing residual star formation. If environment quenching plays a role in the GEEC2 sample, then our work suggests that only a fraction of intermediate galaxies may be undergoing this transition and that quenching occurs quite rapidly in satellite galaxies ($\lesssim0.25$ Gyr).
  • Several recent observational studies have concluded that the initial mass function (IMF) of stars varies systematically with galaxy properties such as velocity dispersion. In this paper, we investigate the effect of linking the circular velocity of galaxies, as determined from the Fundamental Plane and Tully-Fisher relations, to the slope of the IMF with parameterizations guided by several of these studies. For each empirical relation, we generate stellar masses of ~600,000 SDSS galaxies at z ~ 0.1, by fitting the optical photometry to large suites of synthetic stellar populations that sample the full range of galaxy parameters. We generate stellar mass functions and examine the stellar-to-halo mass relations using sub-halo abundance matching. At the massive end, the stellar mass functions become a power law, instead of the familiar exponential decline. As a result, it is a generic feature of these models that the central galaxy stellar-to-halo mass relation is significantly flatter at high masses (slope ~ -0.3 to -0.4) than in the case of a universal IMF (slope ~ -0.6). We find that regardless of whether the IMF varies systematically in all galaxies or just early types, there is still a well-defined peak in the central stellar-to-halo mass ratio at halo masses of ~ 10E12 solar masses. In general, the IMF variations explored here lead to significantly higher integrated stellar densities if the assumed dependence on circular velocity applies to all galaxies, including late-types; in fact the more extreme cases can be ruled out, as they imply an unphysical situation in which the stellar fraction exceeds the universal baryon fraction.
  • In order to understand the processes that quench star formation within rich clusters, we construct a library of subhalo orbits drawn from $\Lambda$CDM cosmological N-body simulations of four rich clusters. The orbits are combined with models of star formation followed by quenching in the cluster environment. These are compared with observed bulge and disc colours and stellar absorption linestrength indices of satellite galaxies. Models in which the bulge stellar populations depend only on the galaxy subhalo mass while the disc quenching depends on the cluster environment are acceptable fits to the data. An exponential disc quenching timescale of 3 - 3.5 Gyr is preferred. Models with short ($\lesssim 1$ Gyr) quenching timescales yield cluster-centric gradients in disc colours and Balmer line indices that are too steep compared to observations. We also examine models in which there is quenching in lower mass groups prior to cluster infall ("pre-processing"), finding that such models are a better fit to the data than models without pre-processing and require similar quenching times. The data slightly prefer models where quenching occurs only for galaxies falling within about 0.5 $r_{200}$. Finally, we have examined models with short quenching timescales of 1 Gyr, but a long delay time of 3 Gyr prior to quenching. All models with short quenching timescales, even such "delayed-then-rapid" quenching models, produce excessively red galaxies near the cluster core and are strongly disfavoured by the data. These results imply that the environments of rich clusters must impact star formation rates of infalling galaxies on relatively long timescales -- several times longer than a typical halo spends within the virial radius of a cluster. This scenario favours gentler quenching mechanisms such as slow "strangulation" over more rapid ram-pressure stripping.
  • The NGVS-IR project (Next Generation Virgo Survey - Infrared) is a contiguous near-infrared imaging survey of the Virgo cluster of galaxies. It complements the optical wide-field survey of Virgo (NGVS). The current state of NGVS-IR consists of Ks-band imaging of 4 deg^2 centered on M87, and J and Ks-band imaging of 16 deg^2 covering the region between M49 and M87. In this paper, we present the observations of the central 4 deg^2 centered on Virgo's core region. The data were acquired with WIRCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the total integration time was 41 hours distributed in 34 contiguous tiles. A survey-specific strategy was designed to account for extended galaxies while still measuring accurate sky brightness within the survey area. The average 5\sigma limiting magnitude is Ks=24.4 AB mag and the 50% completeness limit is Ks=23.75 AB mag for point source detections, when using only images with better than 0.7" seeing (median seeing 0.54"). Star clusters are marginally resolved in these image stacks, and Virgo galaxies with \mu_Ks=24.4 AB mag arcsec^-2 are detected. Combining the Ks data with optical and ultraviolet data, we build the uiK color-color diagram which allows a very clean color-based selection of globular clusters in Virgo. This diagnostic plot will provide reliable globular cluster candidates for spectroscopic follow-up campaigns needed to continue the exploration of Virgo's photometric and kinematic sub-structures, and will help the design of future searches for globular clusters in extragalactic systems. Equipped with this powerful new tool, future NGVS-IR investigations based on the uiK diagram will address the mapping and analysis of extended structures and compact stellar systems in and around Virgo galaxies.
  • We examine galaxy groups from the present epoch to z = 1 to explore the impact of group dynamics on galaxy evolution. We use group catalagues from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Group Environment and Evolution Collaboration (GEEC) and the high redshift GEEC2 sample to study how the observed member properties depend on galaxy stellar mass, group dynamical mass and dynamical state of the host group. We find a strong correlation between the fraction of non-star-forming (quiescent) galaxies and galaxy stellar mass, but do not detect a significant difference in the quiescent fraction with group dynamical mass, within our sample halo mass range of 10^13-10^14.5 M_sun, or with dynamical sate. However, at a redshift of approximately 0.4 we do see some evidence that the quiescent fraction in low mass galaxies (log(M_star/M_sun) < 10.5) is lower in groups with substructure. Additionally, our results show that the fraction of groups with non-Gaussian velocity distributions increases with redshift to roughly z = 0.4, while the amount of detected substructure remains constant to z = 1. Based on these results, we conclude that for massive galaxies (log(M_star/M_sun_ > 10.5), evolution is most strongly correlated to the stellar mass of a galaxy with little or no additional effect related to either the group dynamical mass or dynamical state. For low mass galaxies, we do see some evidence of a correlation between the quiescent fraction and the amount of detected substructure, highlighting the need to probe further down the stellar mass function to elucidate the role of the environment in galaxy evolution.
  • We present an investigation into the origins of a series of interlaced narrow filamentary stellar structures, loops and plumes in the vicinity of the Virgo Cluster, edge-on spiral galaxy, NGC 4216 that were previously identified by the Blackbird Telescope. Using the deeper, higher-resolution and precisely calibrated optical CFHT/MegaCam images obtained as part of the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), we confirm the previously identified features and identify a few additional structures. The NGVS data allowed us to make a physical study of these low-surface brightness features and investigate their origin. The likely progenitors of the structures were identified as either already catalogued VCC dwarfs or newly discovered satellites caught in the act of being destroyed. They have the same g-i color index and likely contain similar stellar populations. The alignment of three dwarfs along an apparently single stream is intriguing, and we cannot totally exclude that these are second-generation dwarf galaxies being born inside the filament from the debris of an original dwarf. The observed complex structures, including in particular a stream apparently emanating from a satellite of a satellite, point to a high rate of ongoing dwarf destruction/accretion in the region of the Virgo Cluster where NGC 4216 is located. We discuss the age of the interactions and whether they occurred in a group that is just falling into the cluster and shows signs of so-called "pre-processing" before it gets affected by the cluster environment, or in a group which already ventured towards the central regions of Virgo Cluster.
  • We present deep GMOS-S spectroscopy for 11 galaxy groups at 0.8<z<1.0, for galaxies with r_{AB}<24.75. Our sample is highly complete (>66%) for eight of the eleven groups. Using an optical-NIR colour-colour diagram, the galaxies in the sample were separated with a dust insensitive method into three categories: passive (red), star-forming (blue), and intermediate (green). The strongest environmental dependence is observed in the fraction of passive galaxies, which make up only ~20 per cent of the field in the mass range 10^{10.3}<M_{star}/M_\odot<10^{11.0} but are the dominant component of groups. If we assume that the properties of the field are similar to those of the `pre-accreted' population, the environment quenching efficiency (\epsilon_\rho) is defined as the fraction of field galaxies required to be quenched in order to match the observed red fraction inside groups. The efficiency obtained is ~0.4, similar to its value in intermediate-density environments locally. While green (intermediate) galaxies represent ~20 per cent of the star-forming population in both the group and field, at all stellar masses, the average sSFR of the group population is lower by a factor of ~3. The green population does not show strong H-delta absorption that is characteristic of starburst galaxies. Finally, the high fraction of passive galaxies in groups, when combined with satellite accretion models, require that most accreted galaxies have been affected by their environment. Thus, any delay between accretion and the onset of truncation of star formation (\tau) must be <2 Gyr, shorter than the 3-7 Gyr required to fit data at z=0. The relatively small fraction of intermediate galaxies requires that the actual quenching process occurs quickly, with an exponential decay timescale of \tau_q<1 Gyr.
  • We present the global group properties of two samples of galaxy groups containing 39 high quality X-ray selected systems and 38 optically (spectroscopically) selected systems in coincident spatial regions at 0.12<z<0.79. Only nine optical systems are associable with X-ray systems. We discuss the confusion inherent in the matching of both galaxies to extended X-ray emission and of X-ray emission to already identified optical systems. Extensive spectroscopy has been obtained and the resultant redshift catalog and group membership are provided here. X-ray, dynamical, and total stellar masses of the groups are also derived and presented. We explore the effects of applying three different kinds of radial cut to our systems: a constant cut of 1 Mpc and two r200 cuts, one based on the velocity dispersion of the system and the other on the X-ray emission. We find that an X-ray based r200 results in less scatter in scaling relations and less dynamical complexity as evidenced by results of the Anderson-Darling and Dressler-Schectman tests, indicating that this radius tends to isolate the virialized part of the system. The constant and velocity dispersion based cuts can overestimate membership and can work to inflate velocity dispersion and dynamical and stellar mass. We find Lx-sigma and Mstellar-Lx scaling relations for X-ray and optically selected systems are not dissimilar. The mean fraction of mass found in stars for our systems is approximately 0.014 with a logarithmic standard deviation of 0.398 dex. We also define and investigate a sample of groups which are X-ray underluminous given the total group stellar mass. For these systems the fraction of stellar mass contributed by the most massive galaxy is typically lower than that found for the total population of groups implying that there may be less IGM contributed from the most massive member in these systems. (Abridged)
  • The presence of substructure in galaxy groups and clusters is believed to be a sign of recent galaxy accretion and can be used not only to probe the assembly history of these structures, but also the evolution of their member galaxies. Using the Dressler-Shectman (DS) Test, we study substructure in a sample of intermediate redshift (z ~ 0.4) galaxy groups from the Group Environment and Evolution Collaboration (GEEC) group catalog. We find that 4 of the 15 rich GEEC groups, with an average velocity dispersion of ~525 km s-1, are identified as having significant substructure. The identified regions of localized substructure lie on the group outskirts and in some cases appear to be infalling. In a comparison of galaxy properties for the members of groups with and without substructure, we find that the groups with substructure have a significantly higher fraction of blue and star-forming galaxies and a parent colour distribution that resembles that of the field population rather than the overall group population. In addition, we observe correlations between the detection of substructure and other dynamical measures, such as velocity distributions and velocity dispersion profiles. Based on this analysis, we conclude that some galaxy groups contain significant substructure and that these groups have properties and galaxy populations that differ from groups with no detected substructure. These results indicate that the substructure galaxies, which lie preferentially on the group outskirts and could be infalling, do not exhibit signs of environmental effects, since little or no star-formation quenching is observed in these systems.
  • We explore the use of simple star-formation rate (SFR) indicators (such as may be used in high-redshift galaxy surveys) in the local Universe using [OII], Ha, and u-band luminosities from the deeper 275 deg^2 Stripe 82 subsample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) coupled with UV data from the Galaxy Evolution EXplorer satellite (GALEX). We examine the consistency of such methods using the star-formation rate density (SFRD) as a function of stellar mass in this local volume, and quantify the accuracy of corrections for dust and metallicity on the various indicators. Rest-frame u-band promises to be a particularly good SFR estimator for high redshift studies since it does not require a particularly large or sensitive extinction correction, yet yields results broadly consistent with more observationally expensive methods. We suggest that the [OII]-derived SFR, commonly used at higher redshifts (z~1), can be used to reliably estimate SFRs for ensembles of galaxies, but for high mass galaxies (log(M*/Msun)>10), a larger correction than is typically used is required to compensate for the effects of metallicity dependence and dust extinction. We provide a new empirical mass-dependent correction for the [OII]-SFR.
  • We present measurements of the specific star-formation rate (SSFR)-stellar mass relation for star-forming galaxies. Our deep spectroscopic samples are based on the Redshift One LDSS3 Emission line Survey, ROLES, and European Southern Observatory, ESO, public spectroscopy at z=1, and on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) at z=0.1. These datasets cover an equally deep mass range of 8.5<~log(M*/Msun)<~11 at both epochs. We find that the SSFR--mass relation evolves in a way which is remarkably independent of stellar mass, as we previously found for the star-formation rate density (SFRD)--mass relation. At higher masses, such as those probed by previous surveys, the evolution in SSFR--mass is almost independent of stellar mass. At higher masses (log(M*/Msun)>10) the shapes of the cumulative cosmic SFRDs are very similar at both z=0.1 and z=1.0, both showing 70% of the total SFRD above a mass of log(M*/Msun)>10. Mass functions are constructed for star-forming galaxies and found to evolve by only <35% between z=1 and z=0.1 over the whole mass range. The evolution is such that the mass function decreases with increasing cosmic time, confirming that galaxies are leaving the star-forming sequence/blue cloud. The observational results are extended to z~2 by adding two recent Lyman break galaxy samples, and data at these three epochs (z=0.1, 1, 2) are compared with the GALFORM semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. GALFORM predicts an overall SFR density (SFRD) as a function of stellar mass in reasonable agreement with the observations. The star formation timescales inferred from 1/SSFR also give reasonable overall agreement, with the agreement becoming worse at the lowest and highest masses. [abridged]
  • (abridged) We introduce our survey of galaxy groups at 0.85<z<1, as an extension of the Group Environment and Evolution Collaboration (GEEC). Here we present the first results, based on Gemini GMOS-S nod-and-shuffle spectroscopy of seven galaxy groups selected from spectroscopically confirmed, extended XMM detections in COSMOS. In total we have over 100 confirmed group members, and four of the groups have >15 members. The dynamical mass estimates are in good agreement with the masses estimated from the X-ray luminosity, with most of the groups having 13<log(Mdyn/Msun)<14. Our spectroscopic sample is statistically complete for all galaxies with Mstar>1E10.1 Msun, and for blue galaxies we sample masses as low as Mstar=1E8.8 Msun. Like lower-redshift groups, these systems are dominated by red galaxies, at all stellar masses Mstar>1E10.1 Msun. Few group galaxies inhabit the "blue cloud" that dominates the surrounding field; instead, we find a large and possibly distinct population of galaxies with intermediate colours. The "green valley" that exists at low redshift is instead well-populated in these groups, containing ~30 per cent of galaxies. These do not appear to be exceptionally dusty galaxies, and about half show prominent Balmer-absorption lines. Furthermore, their HST morphologies appear to be intermediate between those of red-sequence and blue-cloud galaxies of the same stellar mass. We postulate that these are a transient population, migrating from the blue cloud to the red sequence, with a star formation rate that declines with an exponential timescale 0.6 Gyr< tau < 2 Gyr. Their prominence among the group galaxy population, and the marked lack of blue, star-forming galaxies, provides evidence that the group environment either directly reduces star formation in member galaxies, or at least prevents its rejuvenation during the normal cycle of galaxy evolution.
  • We analyse the stellar and hot gas content of 18 nearby, low-mass galaxy clusters, detected in redshift space and selected to have a dynamical mass 3E14<M/Msun<6E14, as measured from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. We combine X-ray measurements from both Chandra and XMM with ground-based near-infrared observations from CTIO, AAT and CFHT to compare the mass in hot gas and stars to the dynamical mass and state of the clusters. Only 13 of the clusters are detected in X-ray emission, and for these systems we find that a range of 7-20 per cent of their baryonic mass, and <3 per cent of their dynamical mass, is detected in starlight, similar to what is observed in more massive clusters. In contrast, the five undetected clusters are underluminous in X-ray emission, by up to a factor 10, given their stellar mass. Although the velocity distribution of cluster members in these systems is indistinguishable from a Gaussian, all show subtle signs of being unrelaxed: either they lack a central, dominant galaxy, or the bright galaxy distribution is less concentrated and/or more elongated than the rest of the sample. Thus we conclude that low-mass clusters and groups selected from the velocity distribution of their galaxies exhibit a dichotomy in their hot gas properties. Either they are detected in X-ray, in which case they generally lie on the usual scaling relations, or they are completely undetected in X-ray emission. The non-detections may be partly related to the apparently young dynamical state of the clusters, but it remains a distinct possibility that some of these systems are exceptionally devoid of hot emitting gas as the result of its expulsion or rarefaction.
  • We examine the dust distribution around a sample of 70,000 low redshift galaxy groups and clusters derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. By correlating spectroscopically identified background quasars with the galaxy groups we obtain the relative colour excess due to dust reddening. We present a significant detection of dust out to a clustercentric distance of 30 Mpc/h in all four independent SDSS colours, consistent with the expectations of weak lensing masses of similar mass halos and excess galaxy counts. The wavelength dependence of this colour excess is consistent with the expectations of a Milky Way dust law with R_V=3.1. Further, we find that the halo mass dependence of the dust content is much smaller than would be expected by a simple scaling, implying that the dust-to-gas ratio of the most massive clusters (~10E14 Msun/h) is ~3% of the local ISM value, while in small groups (~10E12.7 Msun/h) it is ~55% of the local ISM value. We also find that the dust must have a covering fraction on the order of 10% to explain the observed color differences, which means the dust is not just confined to the most massive galaxies. Comparing the dust profile with the excess galaxy profile, we find that the implied dust-to-galaxy ratio falls significantly towards the group or cluster center. This has a significant halo mass dependence, such that the more massive groups and clusters show a stronger reduction. This suggests that either dust is destroyed by thermal sputtering of the dust grains by the hot, dense gas or the intrinsic dust production is reduced in these galaxies.
  • Motivated by suggestions of 'cosmic downsizing', in which the dominant contribution to the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD) proceeds from higher to lower mass galaxies with increasing cosmic time, we describe the design and implementation of the Redshift One LDSS3 Emission line Survey (ROLES). ROLES is a K-selected (22.5 < K_AB < 24.0) survey for dwarf galaxies [8.5<log(M*/Msun)< 9.5] at 0.89 < z < 1.15 drawn from two extremely deep fields (GOODS-S and MS1054-FIRES). Using the [OII]3727 emission line, we obtain redshifts and star-formation rates (SFRs) for star-forming galaxies down to a limit of ~0.3 Msun/yr. We present the [OII] luminosity function measured in ROLES and find a faint end slope of alpha_faint ~ -1.5, similar to that measured at z~0.1 in the SDSS. By combining ROLES with higher mass surveys, we measure the SFRD as a function of stellar mass using [OII] (with and without various empirical corrections), and using SED-fitting to obtain the SFR from the rest-frame UV luminosity for galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. Our best estimate of the corrected [OII]-SFRD and UV SFRD both independently show that the SFRD evolves equally for galaxies of all masses between z~1 and z~0.1. The exact evolution in normalisation depends on the indicator used, with the [OII]-based estimate showing a change of a factor of ~2.6 and the UV-based a factor of ~6. We discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy in normalisation between the indicators, but note that the magnitude of this uncertainty is comparable to the discrepancy between indicators seen in other z~1 works. Our result that the shape of the SFRD as a function of stellar mass (and hence the mass range of galaxies dominating the SFRD) does not evolve between z~1 and z~0.1 is robust to the choice of indicator. [abridged]
  • We probe the diffuse stellar mass in a sample of 1401 low redshift galaxy groups (10E13 - 10E14 Msun/h) by examining the rate of hostless Type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) within the groups. We correlate the sample of confirmed SNe Ia from the SDSS supernova survey with the positions of our galaxy groups, as well as with the resolved galaxies within them. We find that 19 of the 59 SNe Ia within the group sample have no detectable host galaxy, with another three ambiguous instances. This gives a robust upper limit that a maximum of 2.69% +1.58%/-1.34% of the group's total mass arises from diffuse stars in the intragroup medium. After correcting for a contribution from "prompt" SNe occurring within galaxies, and including a contribution from those which arise in dwarf galaxies below our photometric limit, we find that only 1.32% +0.78%/-0.70% of the group's total mass is likely in the form of diffuse stellar mass. Combining this result with the galaxy stellar mass functions of Yang et al., we find that 47% +16%/-15% of the stellar mass in our groups is in the form of diffuse light, so that stars make up a fraction 0.028 +0.011/-0.010 of the total group mass. Galaxy groups appear to be very efficient in disrupting stellar mass into a diffuse component; however, stars still make up a small fraction of the group mass, comparable to that seen in rich clusters. This remains a challenge to galaxy formation models.
  • We present photometric, spectroscopic and weak lensing analysis of the large-scale structure and dynamics of the most X-ray luminous galaxy cluster known, RX J1347-1145, at z=0.451. We spectroscopically confirmed 47 new members with LDSS3 on the Magellan telescope. Together with previously known members, we measure a new velocity dispersion of 1163(+/-97) km/s. The mass inferred from our velocity dispersion is M200 = 1.16^{+0.32}_{-0.27}x10^{15} solar mass, with r200=1.85Mpc, under the assumption of a singular isothermal sphere. We also present a weak lensing analysis using deep CFHT data on this cluster, and find a deprojected mass of 1.47^{+0.46}_{-0.43}x10^{15} solar mass within r200, in excellent agreement with our dynamical estimate. Thus, our new dynamical mass estimate is consistent with that from weak lensing and X-ray studies in the literature, resolving a previously claimed discrepancy. We photometrically detect and spectroscopically confirm another massive cluster with sigma=780(+/-100) km/s and M200=3.4^{+1.4}_{-1.1}x10^{14} solar mass ~7Mpc south-west of RX J1347-1145, which we refer to as RXJ1347-SW. Our spectroscopic survey reveals a possible excess of galaxies in velocity space in the region between RX J1347-1145 and RXJ1347-SW; comparing with simulations, this excess appears consistent with that expected from a large filamentary structure traced by galaxies connecting these two clusters.
  • We measure the diversity of galaxy groups and clusters with mass M>1E13/h Msun, in terms of the star formation history of their galaxy populations, for the purpose of constraining the mass scale at which environmentally-important processes play a role in galaxy evolution. We consider three different group catalogues, selected in different ways, with photometry and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For each system we measure the fraction of passively-evolving galaxies within R200 and brighter than either Mr=-18 (and with z<0.05) or Mr=-20 (and z<0.1). We use the (u-g) and (r-i) galaxy colours to distinguish between star-forming and passively-evolving galaxies. By considering the binomial distribution expected from the observed number of members in each cluster, we are able to either recover the intrinsic scatter in this fraction, or put robust 95% confidence upper-limits on its value. The intrinsic standard deviation in the fraction of passive galaxies is consistent with a small value of <0.1 in most mass bins for all three samples. There is no strong trend with mass; even groups with M=1E13/h Msun are consistent with such a small, intrinsic distribution. We compare these results with theoretical models of the accretion history to show that, if environment plays a role in transforming galaxies, such effects must occur first at mass scales far below that of rich clusters, at most M=1E13 Msun.