• Inference of latent feature models in the Bayesian nonparametric setting is generally difficult, especially in high dimensional settings, because it usually requires proposing features from some prior distribution. In special cases, where the integration is tractable, we could sample new feature assignments according to a predictive likelihood. However, this still may not be efficient in high dimensions. We present a novel method to accelerate the mixing of latent variable model inference by proposing feature locations from the data, as opposed to the prior. First, we introduce our accelerated feature proposal mechanism that we will show is a valid Bayesian inference algorithm and next we propose an approximate inference strategy to perform accelerated inference in parallel. This sampling method is efficient for proper mixing of the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler, computationally attractive, and is theoretically guaranteed to converge to the posterior distribution as its limiting distribution.
  • Training Gaussian process-based models typically involves an $ O(N^3)$ computational bottleneck due to inverting the covariance matrix. Popular methods for overcoming this matrix inversion problem cannot adequately model all types of latent functions, and are often not parallelizable. However, judicious choice of model structure can ameliorate this problem. A mixture-of-experts model that uses a mixture of $K$ Gaussian processes offers modeling flexibility and opportunities for scalable inference. Our embarrassingly parallel algorithm combines low-dimensional matrix inversions with importance sampling to yield a flexible, scalable mixture-of-experts model that offers comparable performance to Gaussian process regression at a much lower computational cost.
  • Effective and accurate model selection is an important problem in modern data analysis. One of the major challenges is the computational burden required to handle large data sets that cannot be stored or processed on one machine. Another challenge one may encounter is the presence of outliers and contaminations that damage the inference quality. The parallel "divide and conquer" model selection strategy divides the observations of the full data set into roughly equal subsets and perform inference and model selection independently on each subset. After local subset inference, this method aggregates the posterior model probabilities or other model/variable selection criteria to obtain a final model by using the notion of geometric median. This approach leads to improved concentration in finding the "correct" model and model parameters and also is provably robust to outliers and data contamination.