• In typical astrophysical environments, the abundance of heavy elements ranges from 0.001 to 2 times the solar concentration. Lower abundances have been seen in select stars in the Milky Way's halo and in two quasar absorption systems at redshift z=3. These are widely interpreted as relics from the early universe, when all gas possessed a primordial chemistry. Before now there have been no direct abundance measurements from the first Gyr after the Big Bang, when the earliest stars began synthesizing elements. Here we report observations of hydrogen and heavy element absorption in a quasar spectrum at z=7.04, when the universe was just 772 Myr old (5.6% its present age). We detect a large column of neutral hydrogen but no corresponding heavy elements, limiting the chemical abundance to less than 1/10,000 the solar level if the gas is in a gravitationally bound protogalaxy, or less than 1/1,000 solar if it is diffuse and unbound. If the absorption is truly intergalactic, it would imply that the universe was neither ionized by starlight nor chemically enriched in this neighborhood at z~7. If it is gravitationally bound, the inferred abundance is too low to promote efficient cooling, and the system would be a viable site to form the predicted but as-yet unobserved massive population III stars in the early universe.
  • We present a detailed study of HI and metals for 110 MgII absorption systems discovered at 1.98 <= z <= 5.33 in the infrared spectra of high redshift QSOs. Using new measurements of rest-frame UV lines from optical spectra of the same targets, we compare the high redshift sample with carefully constructed low redshift control samples from the literature to study evolutionary trends from z=0 --> 5.33 (>12 Gyr). We observe a significant strengthening in the characteristic N(HI) for fixed MgII equivalent width as one moves toward higher redshift. Indeed at our sample's mean zbar=3.402, all MgII systems are either damped Ly-alpha absorbers or sub-DLAs, with 40.7% of systems exceeding the DLA threshold (compared to 16.7% at zbar=0.927). We set lower limits on the metallicity of the MgII systems where we can measure HI; these results are consistent with the full DLA population. The classical MgII systems (W(2796)=0.3-1.0 Ang), which preferentially associate with sub-DLAs, are quite metal rich at ~0.1 Solar. We applied quantitative classification metrics to our absorbers to compare with low redshift populations, finding that weak systems are similar to classic MgII absorbers at low redshift. The strong systems either have very large MgII and FeII velocity spreads implying non-virialized dynamics, or are more quiescent DLAs. There is tentative evidence that the kinetically complex systems evolve in similar fashion to the global star formation rate. We speculate that if weaker MgII systems represent accreting gas as suggested by recent studies of galaxy-absorber inclinations, then their high metal abundance suggests re-accretion of recently ejected material rather than first-time infall from the metal-poor IGM, even at early times.
  • We present initial results from the first systematic survey for MgII quasar absorption lines at z > 2.5. Using infrared spectra of 46 high-redshift quasars, we discovered 111 MgII systems over a path covering 1.9 < z < 6.3. Five systems have z > 5, with a maximum of z = 5.33 - the most distant MgII system now known. The comoving MgII line density for weaker systems (Wr < 1.0A) is statistically consistent with no evolution from z = 0.4 to z = 5.5, while that for stronger systems increases three-fold until z \sim 3 before declining again towards higher redshifts. The equivalent width distribution, which fits an exponential, reflects this evolution by flattening as z approaches 3 before steepening again. The rise and fall of the strong absorbers suggests a connection to the star formation rate density, as though they trace galactic outflows or other byproducts of star formation. The weaker systems' lack of evolution does not fit within this interpretation, but may be reproduced by extrapolating low redshift scaling relations between host galaxy luminosity and absorbing halo radius to earlier epochs. For the weak systems, luminosity-scaled models match the evolution better than similar models based on MgII occupation of evolving CDM halo masses, which greatly underpredict dN/dz at early times unless the absorption efficiency of small haloes is significantly larger in the early universe. Taken together, these observations suggest that the general structure of MgII-bearing haloes was put into place early in the process of galaxy assembly. Except for a transient appearance of stronger systems near the peak epoch of cosmic star formation, the basic properties of MgII absorbers have evolved fairly little even as the (presumably) associated galaxy population grew substantially in stellar mass and half light radius.
  • In radio astronomy, the correlator measures intensity in visibility space. In addition, the EoR power spectrum measured by an experiment such as the MWA is constructed in visibility space. Thus, correcting for the ionosphere in the uv-plane instead of real space could potentially save computation. In this paper, we study this technique. The mathematical formula for obtaining the unperturbed data from the ionospherically reflected data is non-local in the uv-plane. Moreover, an analytic solution for the unperturbed intensity may only be obtained for a limited number of expansions of the ionospheric perturbations. We numerically study one of these expansions (with perturbations as sinusoidal modes). Obtaining an analytic solution for this expansion required a Taylor expansion, and we investigate the optimal order of this expansion. We also propose a number of potential computation saving techniques, and evaluate their pros and cons.