• We study how the void environment affects galactic chemical evolution by comparing the oxygen and nitrogen abundances of dwarf galaxies in voids with dwarf galaxies in denser regions. Using spectroscopic observations from SDSS DR7, we estimate oxygen, nitrogen, and neon abundances of 889 void dwarf galaxies and 672 dwarf galaxies in denser regions. A substitute for the [OII] 3727 doublet is developed, permitting oxygen abundance estimates of SDSS dwarf galaxies at all redshifts with the Direct Te method. We find that void dwarf galaxies have about the same oxygen abundance and Ne/O ratio, slightly higher neon abundances, and slightly lower nitrogen abundance and N/O ratio than dwarf galaxies in denser environments. We conclude that the void environment has a slight influence on dwarf galaxy chemical evolution. Our mass-N/O relationship shows that the secondary production of nitrogen commences at a lower stellar mass in void dwarf galaxies than in dwarf galaxies in denser environments. Our dwarf galaxy sample demonstrates a strong anti-correlation between the sSFR and N/O ratio, providing evidence that oxygen is produced in higher mass stars than those which synthesize nitrogen. The lower N/O ratios and smaller stellar mass for secondary nitrogen production seen in void dwarf galaxies may indicate both delayed star formation and a dependence of cosmic downsizing on the large-scale environment. A shift toward slightly higher oxygen abundances in void dwarf galaxies could be evidence of larger ratios of dark matter halo mass to stellar mass in voids than in denser regions.
  • AGN exhibit rapid, high amplitude stochastic flux variations across the entire electromagnetic spectrum on timescales ranging from hours to years. The cause of this variability is poorly understood. We present a Green's Function-based method for using variability to (1) measure the time-scales on which flux perturbations evolve and (2) characterize the driving flux perturbations. We model the observed light curve of an AGN as a linear differential equation driven by stochastic impulses. We analyze the light curve of the Kepler AGN Zw 229-15 and find that the observed variability behavior can be modeled as a damped harmonic oscillator perturbed by a colored noise process. The model powerspectrum turns over on time-scale $385$~d. On shorter time-scales, the log-powerspectrum slope varies between $2$ and $4$, explaining the behavior noted by previous studies. We recover and identify both the $5.6$~d and $67$~d timescales reported by previous work using the Green's Function of the C-ARMA equation rather than by directly fitting the powerspectrum of the light curve. These are the timescales on which flux perturbations grow, and on which flux perturbations decay back to the steady-state flux level respectively. We make the software package KALI used to study light curves using our method available to the community.
  • We examine how the cosmic environment affects the chemical evolution of galaxies in the Universe by comparing the N/O ratio of dwarf galaxies in voids with dwarf galaxies in more dense regions. Ratios of the forbidden [O III] and [S II] transitions provide estimates of a region's electron temperature and number density. We estimate the abundances of oxygen and nitrogen using these temperature and density estimates and the emission line fluxes [O II] 3727, [O III] 4959, 5007, and [N II] 6548, 6584 with the direct Te method. Using spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we are able to estimate the N/O ratio in 42 void dwarf galaxies and 89 dwarf galaxies in more dense regions. The N/O ratio for void dwarfs (Mr > -17) is slightly lower (12%) than for dwarf galaxies in denser regions. We also estimate the nitrogen and oxygen abundances of 2050 void galaxies and 3883 galaxies in more dense regions with Mr > -20. These somewhat brighter galaxies (but still fainter than L*) also display similar minor shifts in the N/O ratio. The shifts in the average and median element abundance values in all absolute magnitude bins studied are in the same direction, suggesting that the large-scale environment may influence the chemical evolution of galaxies. We discuss possible causes of such a large-scale environmental dependence of the chemical evolution of galaxies, including retarded star formation and a higher dark matter halo mass to stellar mass ratio in void galaxies.
  • We study how the cosmic environment affects galaxy evolution in the Universe by comparing the metallicities of dwarf galaxies in voids with dwarf galaxies in more dense regions. Ratios of the fluxes of emission lines, particularly those of the forbidden [O III] and [S II] transitions, provide estimates of a region's electron temperature and number density. From these two quantities and the emission line fluxes [O II] 3727, [O III] 4363, and [O III] 4959,5007, we estimate the abundance of oxygen with the Direct Te method. We estimate the metallicity of 42 blue, star-forming void dwarf galaxies and 89 blue, star-forming dwarf galaxies in more dense regions using spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, as re-processed in the MPA-JHU value-added catalog. We find very little difference between the two sets of galaxies, indicating little influence from the large-scale environment on their chemical evolution. Of particular interest are a number of extremely metal-poor dwarf galaxies that are less prevalent in voids than in the denser regions.
  • We measure the star formation properties of two large samples of galaxies from the SDSS in large-scale cosmic voids on time scales of 10 Myr and 100 Myr, using H$\alpha$ emission line strengths and GALEX FUV fluxes, respectively. The first sample consists of 109,818 optically selected galaxies. We find that void galaxies in this sample have higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs; star formation rates per unit stellar mass) than similar stellar mass galaxies in denser regions. The second sample is a subset of the optically selected sample containing 8070 galaxies with reliable HI detections from ALFALFA. For the full HI detected sample, SSFRs do not vary systematically with large-scale environment. However, investigating only the HI detected dwarf galaxies reveals a trend towards higher SSFRs in voids. Furthermore, we estimate the star formation rate per unit HI mass (known as the star formation efficiency; SFE) of a galaxy, as a function of environment. For the overall HI detected population, we notice no environmental dependence. Limiting the sample to dwarf galaxies again reveals a trend towards higher SFEs in voids. These results suggest that void environments provide a nurturing environment for dwarf galaxy evolution allowing for higher specific star formation rates and efficiencies.
  • We measure the r-band galaxy luminosity function (LF) across environments over the redshift range 0<$z$<0.107 using the SDSS. We divide our sample into galaxies residing in large scale voids (void galaxies) and those residing in denser regions (wall galaxies). The best fitting Schechter parameters for void galaxies are: log$\Phi^*$= -3.40$\pm$0.03 log(Mpc$^{-3}$), $M^*$= -19.88$\pm$0.05, and $\alpha$=-1.20$\pm$0.02. For wall galaxies, the best fitting parameters are: log$\Phi^*$=-2.86$\pm$0.02 log(Mpc$^{-3}$), $M^*$=-20.80$\pm$0.03, and $\alpha$=-1.16$\pm$0.01. We find a shift in the characteristic magnitude, $M^*$, towards fainter magnitudes for void galaxies and find no significant difference between the faint-end slopes of the void and wall galaxy LFs. We investigate how low surface brightness selections effects can affect the galaxy LF. To attempt to examine a sample of galaxies that is relatively free of surface brightness selection effects, we compute the optical galaxy LF of galaxies detected by the blind HI survey, ALFALFA. We find that the global LF of the ALFALFA sample is not well fit by a Schechter function, because of the presence of a wide dip in the LF around $M_r$=-18 and an upturn at fainter magnitudes ($\alpha$~-1.47). We compare the HI selected r-band LF to various LFs of optically selected populations to determine where the HI selected optical LF obtains its shape. We find that sample selection plays a large role in determining the shape of the LF.
  • We gauge the impact of spacecraft-induced effects on the inferred variability properties of the light curve of the Seyfert 1 AGN Zw 229-15 observed by \Kepler. We compare the light curve of Zw 229-15 obtained from the Kepler MAST database with a re-processed light curve constructed from raw pixel data (Williams & Carini, 2015). We use the first-order structure function, $SF(\delta t)$, to fit both light curves to the damped power-law PSD of Kasliwal, Vogeley & Richards, 2015. On short timescales, we find a steeper log-PSD slope ($\gamma = 2.90$ to within $10$ percent) for the re-processed light curve as compared to the light curve found on MAST ($\gamma = 2.65$ to within $10$ percent)---both inconsistent with a damped random walk which requires $\gamma = 2$. The log-PSD slope inferred for the re-processed light curve is consistent with previous results (Carini & Ryle, 2012, Williams & Carini, 2015) that study the same re-processed light curve. The turnover timescale is almost identical for both light curves ($27.1$ and $27.5$~d for the reprocessed and MAST database light curves). Based on the obvious visual difference between the two versions of the light curve and on the PSD model fits, we conclude that there remain significant levels of spacecraft-induced effects in the standard pipeline reduction of the Kepler data. Re-processing the light curves will change the model inferenced from the data but is unlikely to change the overall scientific conclusion reached by Kasliwal et al. 2015---not all AGN light curves are consistent with the DRW.
  • We test the consistency of active galactic nuclei (AGN) optical flux variability with the $\textit{damped random walk}$ (DRW) model. Our sample consists of 20 multi-quarter $\textit{Kepler}$ AGN light curves including both Type 1 and 2 Seyferts, radio-loud and -quiet AGN, quasars, and blazars. $\textit{Kepler}$ observations of AGN light curves offer a unique insight into the variability properties of AGN light curves because of the very rapid ($11.6-28.6$ min) and highly uniform rest-frame sampling combined with a photometric precision of $1$ part in $10^{5}$ over a period of 3.5 yr. We categorize the light curves of all 20 objects based on visual similarities and find that the light curves fall into 5 broad categories. We measure the first order structure function of these light curves and model the observed light curve with a general broken power-law PSD characterized by a short-timescale power-law index $\gamma$ and turnover timescale $\tau$. We find that less than half the objects are consistent with a DRW and observe variability on short timescales ($\sim 2$ h). The turnover timescale $\tau$ ranges from $\sim 10-135$ d. Interesting structure function features include pronounced dips on rest-frame timescales ranging from $10-100$ d and varying slopes on different timescales. The range of observed short-timescale PSD slopes and the presence of dip and varying slope features suggests that the DRW model may not be appropriate for all AGN. We conclude that AGN variability is a complex phenomenon that requires a more sophisticated statistical treatment.
  • We measure the HI mass function (HIMF) and velocity width function (WF) across environments over a range of masses $7.2<\log(M_{HI}/M_{\odot})<10.8$, and profile widths $1.3\log(km/s)<\log(W)<2.9\log(km/s)$, using a catalog of ~7,300 HI-selected galaxies from the ALFALFA Survey, located in the region of sky where ALFALFA and SDSS (Data Release 7) North overlap. We divide our galaxy sample into those that reside in large-scale voids (void galaxies) and those that live in denser regions (wall galaxies). We find the void HIMF to be well fit by a Schechter function with normalization $\Phi^*=(1.37\pm0.1)\times10^{-2} h^3Mpc^{-3}$, characteristic mass $\log(M^*/M_{\odot})+2\log h_{70}=9.86\pm0.02$, and low-mass-end slope $\alpha=-1.29\pm0.02$. Similarly, for wall galaxies, we find best-fitting parameters $\Phi^*=(1.82\pm0.03)\times10^{-2} h^3Mpc^{-3}$, $\log(M^*/M_{\odot})+2\log h_{70}=10.00\pm0.01$, and $\alpha=-1.35\pm0.01$. We conclude that void galaxies typically have slightly lower HI masses than their non-void counterparts, which is in agreement with the dark matter halo mass function shift in voids assuming a simple relationship between DM mass and HI mass. We also find that the low-mass slope of the void HIMF is similar to that of the wall HIMF suggesting that there is either no excess of low-mass galaxies in voids or there is an abundance of intermediate HI mass galaxies. We fit a modified Schechter function to the ALFALFA void WF and determine its best-fitting parameters to be $\Phi^*=0.21\pm0.1 h^3Mpc^{-3}$, $\log(W^*)=2.13\pm0.3$, $\alpha=0.52\pm0.5$ and high-width slope $\beta=1.3\pm0.4$. For wall galaxies, the WF parameters are: $\Phi^*=0.022\pm0.009 h^3Mpc^{-3}$, $\log(W^*)=2.62\pm0.5$, $\alpha=-0.64\pm0.2$ and $\beta=3.58\pm1.5$. Because of large uncertainties on the void and wall width functions, we cannot conclude whether the WF is dependent on the environment.
  • We explore the mid-infrared (mid-IR) through ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 119,652 luminous broad-lined quasars with 0.064<z<5.46 using mid-IR data from Spitzer and WISE, near-infrared data from Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIDSS, optical data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and UV data from Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The mean SED requires a bolometric correction (relative to 2500A) of BC=2.75+-0.40 using the integrated light from 1um-2keV, and we further explore the range of bolometric corrections exhibited by individual objects. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the mean SED on various parameters, particularly the UV luminosity for quasars with 0.5<z<3 and the properties of the UV emission lines for quasars with z>1.6; the latter is a possible indicator of the strength of the accretion disk wind, which is expected to be SED dependent. Luminosity-dependent mean SEDs show that, relative to the high-luminosity SED, low-luminosity SEDs exhibit a harder (bluer) far-UV spectral slope, a redder optical continuum, and less hot dust. Mean SEDs constructed instead as a function of UV emission line properties reveal changes that are consistent with known Principal Component Analysis (PCA) trends. A potentially important contribution to the bolometric correction is the unseen extream-UV (EUV) continuum. Our work suggests that lower-luminosity quasars and/or quasars with disk-dominated broad emission lines may require an extra continuum component in the EUV that is not present (or much weaker) in high-luminosity quasars with strong accretion disk winds. As such, we consider four possible models and explore the resulting bolometric corrections. Understanding these various SED-dependent effects will be important for accurate determination of quasar accretion rates.
  • Using the sample presented in Pan:2011, we analyse the photometric properties of 88,794 void galaxies and compare them to galaxies in higher density environments with the same absolute magnitude distribution. In Pan et al. (2011), we found a total of 1054 dynamically distinct voids in the SDSS with radius larger than 10h^-1 Mpc. The voids are underdense, with delta rho/rho < -0.9 in their centers. Here we study the photometric properties of these void galaxies. We look at the u - r colours as an indication of star formation activity and the inverse concentration index as an indication of galaxy type. We find that void galaxies are statistically bluer than galaxies found in higher density environments with the same magnitude distribution. We examine the colours of the galaxies as a function of magnitude, and we fit each colour distribution with a double-Gaussian model for the red and blue subpopulations. As we move from bright to dwarf galaxies, the population of red galaxies steadily decreases and the fraction of blue galaxies increases in both voids and walls, however the fraction of blue galaxies in the voids is always higher and bluer than in the walls. We also split the void and wall galaxies into samples depending on galaxy type. We find that late type void galaxies are bluer than late type wall galaxies and the same holds for early galaxies. We also find that early type, dwarf void galaxies are blue in colour. We also study the properties of void galaxies as a function of their distance from the center of the void. We find very little variation in the properties, such as magnitude, colour and type, of void galaxies as a function of their location in the void. The only exception is that the dwarf void galaxies may live closer to the center. The centers of voids have very similar density contrast and hence all void galaxies live in very similar density environments (ABRIDGED)
  • We study the distribution of cosmic voids and void galaxies using Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7). Using the VoidFinder algorithm as described by Hoyle 2002, we identify 1054 statistically significant voids in the northern galactic hemisphere with radii > 10 h^{-1} Mpc. The filling factor of voids in the sample volume is 62%. The largest void is just over 30 h^{-1} Mpc in effective radius. The median effective radius is 17 h^{-1} Mpc. The voids are found to be significantly underdense, with density contrast \delta < -0.85 at the edges of the voids. The radial density profiles of these voids are similar to predictions of dynamically distinct underdensities in gravitational theory. We find 8,046 galaxies brighter than M_r = -20.09 within the voids, accounting for 7% of the galaxies. We compare the results of VoidFinder on SDSS DR7 to mock catalogs generated from a SPH halo model simulation as well as other \Lambda -CDM simulations and find similar void fractions and void sizes in the data and simulations. This catalog is made publicly available at http://www.physics.drexel.edu/~pan/voidcatalog.html for download.
  • Nowadays, science has been coming into a new paradigm, called data-intensive science. While current studies of the new phenomenon focused on building up infrastructure for this new paradigm, yet a few studies concern users of scientific data, particularly their usage practices in the newly emerging paradigm, even though the importance of understanding users' work flow and practices has been summoned. This study endeavors to improve our understanding of users' data usage behavior through a content analysis of publications in a frequently cited new paradigm-related project, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We found that (1) nearly half studies used one data source only. A few studies exploited three or more data sources; (2) the number of objects that were analyzed in SDSS publications is in all scales from one digit to millions; (3) different paper types may affect the data usage patterns; (4) Users are not only consumers of scientific data. They are producers too; (5) studies that can use multiple large scale data sources are relative rare. Issues of data provenance, trust, and usability may prevent researchers from doing this kind of research.
  • We measure the topology of the main galaxy distribution using the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, examining the dependence of galaxy clustering topology on galaxy properties. The observational results are used to test galaxy formation models. A volume-limited sample defined by $M_r<-20.19$ enables us to measure the genus curve with amplitude of $G=378$ at $6h^{-1}$Mpc smoothing scale, with 4.8\% uncertainty including all systematics and cosmic variance. The clustering topology over the smoothing length interval from 6 to $10 h^{-1}$Mpc reveals a mild scale-dependence for the shift ($\Delta\nu$) and void abundance ($A_V$) parameters of the genus curve. We find substantial bias in the topology of galaxy clustering with respect to the predicted topology of the matter distribution, which varies with luminosity, morphology, color, and the smoothing scale of the density field. The distribution of relatively brighter galaxies shows a greater prevalence of isolated clusters and more percolated voids. Even though early (late)-type galaxies show topology similar to that of red (blue) galaxies, the morphology dependence of topology is not identical to the color dependence. In particular, the void abundance parameter $A_V$ depends on morphology more strongly than on color. We test five galaxy assignment schemes applied to cosmological N-body simulations of a $\Lambda$CDM universe to generate mock galaxies: the Halo-Galaxy one-to-one Correspondence model, the Halo Occupation Distribution model, and three implementations of Semi-Analytic Models (SAMs). None of the models reproduces all aspects of the observed clustering topology; the deviations vary from one model to another but include statistically significant discrepancies in the abundance of isolated voids or isolated clusters and the amplitude and overall shift of the genus curve. (Abridged)
  • We introduce a new visual analytic approach to the study of scientific discoveries and knowledge diffusion. Our approach enhances contemporary co-citation network analysis by enabling analysts to identify co-citation clusters of cited references intuitively, synthesize thematic contexts in which these clusters are cited, and trace how research focus evolves over time. The new approach integrates and streamlines a few previously isolated techniques such as spectral clustering and feature selection algorithms. The integrative procedure is expected to empower and strengthen analytical and sense making capabilities of scientists, learners, and researchers to understand the dynamics of the evolution of scientific domains in a wide range of scientific fields, science studies, and science policy evaluation and planning. We demonstrate the potential of our approach through a visual analysis of the evolution of astronomical research associated with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) using bibliographic data between 1994 and 2008. In addition, we also demonstrate that the approach can be consistently applied to a set of heterogeneous data sources such as e-prints on arXiv, publications on ADS, and NSF awards related to the same topic of SDSS.
  • The spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) galaxy sample represents the final set of galaxies observed using the original SDSS target selection criteria. We analyse the clustering of galaxies within this sample, including both the Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) and Main samples, and also include the 2-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) data. Baryon Acoustic Oscillations are observed in power spectra measured for different slices in redshift; this allows us to constrain the distance--redshift relation at multiple epochs. We achieve a distance measure at redshift z=0.275, of r_s(z_d)/D_V(0.275)=0.1390+/-0.0037 (2.7% accuracy), where r_s(z_d) is the comoving sound horizon at the baryon drag epoch, D_V(z)=[(1+z)^2D_A^2cz/H(z)]^(1/3), D_A(z) is the angular diameter distance and H(z) is the Hubble parameter. We find an almost independent constraint on the ratio of distances D_V(0.35)/D_V(0.2)=1.736+/-0.065, which is consistent at the 1.1sigma level with the best fit Lambda-CDM model obtained when combining our z=0.275 distance constraint with the WMAP 5-year data. The offset is similar to that found in previous analyses of the SDSS DR5 sample, but the discrepancy is now of lower significance, a change caused by a revised error analysis and a change in the methodology adopted, as well as the addition of more data. Using WMAP5 constraints on Omega_bh^2 and Omega_ch^2, and combining our BAO distance measurements with those from the Union Supernova sample, places a tight constraint on Omega_m=0.286+/-0.018 and H_0 = 68.2+/-2.2km/s/Mpc that is robust to allowing curvature and non-Lambda dark energy. This result is independent of the behaviour of dark energy at redshifts greater than those probed by the BAO and supernova measurements. (abridged)
  • We discuss here the spatial clustering of Seyferts and LINERs and consequences for their central engines. We show that Seyferts are less clustered than LINERs, and that this difference is not driven by the morphology-density relation, but it is related to the difference in clustering as a function of level of activity in these systems and the amount of fuel available for accretion. LINERs, which are the most clustered among AGN, show the lowest luminosities and obscuration levels, and relatively low gas densities, suggesting that these objects harbor black holes that are relatively massive yet weakly active or inefficient in their accretion, probably due to the insufficiency of their fuel supply. Seyferts, which are weakly clustered, are very luminous, show generally high gas densities and large quantities of obscuring material, suggesting that in these systems the black holes are less massive but abundantly fueled and therefore accrete quickly and probably efficiently enough to clearly dominate the ionization.
  • We measure the cosmological matter density by observing the positions of baryon acoustic oscillations in the clustering of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We jointly analyse the main galaxies and LRGs in the SDSS DR5 sample, using over half a million galaxies in total. The oscillations are detected with 99.74% confidence (3.0sigma assuming Gaussianity) compared to a smooth power spectrum. When combined with the observed scale of the peaks within the CMB, we find a best-fit value of Omega_m=0.256+0.029-0.024 (68% confidence interval), for a flat Lambda cosmology when marginalising over the Hubble parameter and the baryon density. This value of the matter density is derived from the locations of the baryon oscillations in the galaxy power spectrum and in the CMB, and does not include any information from the overall shape of the power spectra. This is an extremely clean cosmological measurement as the physics of the baryon acoustic oscillation production is well understood, and the positions of the oscillations are expected to be independent of systematics such as galaxy bias.
  • We present a Fourier analysis of the clustering of galaxies in the combined Main galaxy and Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 5 (DR5) sample. The aim of our analysis is to consider how well we can measure the cosmological matter density using the signature of the horizon at matter-radiation equality embedded in the large-scale power spectrum. The new data constrains the power spectrum on scales 100--600h^-1Mpc with significantly higher precision than previous analyses of just the SDSS Main galaxies, due to our larger sample and the inclusion of the LRGs. This improvement means that we can now reveal a discrepancy between the shape of the measured power and linear CDM models on scales 0.01<k<0.15hMpc^-1, with linear model fits favouring a lower matter density (Omega_m=0.22+/-0.04) on scales 0.01<k<0.06hMpc^-1 and a higher matter density (Omega_m=0.32+/-0.01) when smaller scales are included, assuming a flat LCDM model with h=0.73 and n_s=0.96. This discrepancy could be explained by scale-dependent bias and, by analysing subsamples of galaxies, we find that the ratio of small-scale to large-scale power increases with galaxy luminosity, so all of the SDSS galaxies cannot trace the same power spectrum shape over 0.01<k<0.2hMpc^-1. However, the data are insufficient to clearly show a luminosity-dependent change in the largest scale at which a significant increase in clustering is observed, although they do not rule out such an effect. Significant scale-dependent galaxy bias on large-scales, which changes with the r-band luminosity of the galaxies, could potentially explain differences in our Omega_m estimates and differences previously observed between 2dFGRS and SDSS power spectra and the resulting parameter constraints.
  • We present the first multi-parameter analysis of the narrow line AGN clustering properties. Estimates of the two-point correlation function (CF) based on SDSS DR2 data reveal that Seyferts are clearly less clustered than normal galaxies, while the clustering amplitude (r_0) of LINERs is consistent with that of the parent galaxy population. The similarities in the host properties (color and concentration index) of Seyferts and LINERs suggest that the difference in their r_0 is not driven by the morphology-density relation. We find that the luminosity of [O I] emission shows the strongest influence on AGN clustering, with low L([O I]) sources having the highest r_0. This trend is much stronger than the previously detected dependence on L([O III]), which we confirm. There is a strong correspondence between the clustering patterns of objects of given spectral type and their physical properties. LINERs, which exhibit high r_0, show the lowest luminosities and obscuration levels, and relatively low gas densities (n_e), suggesting that these objects harbor black holes that are relatively massive yet weakly active or inefficient in their accretion, probably due to the insufficiency of their fuel supply. Seyferts, which have low r_0, are luminous and show large n_e, suggesting that their black holes are less massive but accrete quickly and efficiently enough to clearly dominate the ionization. The low r_0 of the H II galaxies can be understood as a consequence of both the morphology-density and star formation rate-density relations, however, their spectral properties suggest that their centers hide amidst large amounts of obscuring material black holes of generally low mass whose activity remains relatively feeble. Our own Milky Way may be a typical such case.[abridged]
  • Using a nearest neighbor analysis, we construct a sample of void galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and compare the photometric properties of these galaxies to the population of non-void (wall) galaxies. We trace the density field of galaxies using a volume-limited sample with z_{max}=0.089. Galaxies from the flux-limited SDSS with z\leq z_{max} and fewer than three volume-limited neighbors within 7h^{-1}Mpc are classified as void galaxies. This criterion implies a density contrast \delta \rho/ \rho < -0.6 around void galaxies. From 155,000 galaxies, we obtain a sub-sample of 13,742 galaxies with z\leq z_{max}, from which we identify 1,010 galaxies as void galaxies. To identify an additional 194 faint void galaxies from the SDSS in the nearby universe, r~ 72 h^{-1}Mpc, we employ volume-limited samples extracted from the Updated Zwicky Catalog and the Southern Sky Redshift Survey with z_{max}=0.025 to trace the galaxy distribution. Our void galaxies span a range of absolute magnitude from M_r=-13.5 to M_r=-22.5. Using SDSS photometry, we compare the colors, concentration indices, and Sersic indices of the void and wall samples. Void galaxies are significantly bluer than galaxies lying at higher density. The population of void galaxies with M_r ~ M* +1 and brighter is on average bluer and more concentrated (later type) than galaxies outside of voids. The latter behavior is only partly explained by the paucity of luminous red galaxies in voids. These results generally agree with the predictions of semi-analytic models for galaxy formation in cold dark matter models, which indicate that void galaxies should be relatively bluer, more disklike, and have higher specific star formation rates.
  • We study the spectroscopic properties of a sample of 10^3 void galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and compare these with the properties of galaxies in higher density regions (wall galaxies). This sample of void galaxies covers the range of absolute magnitude from M_r=-13.5 to M_r=-22.5 in regions with density contrast delta < -0.6. In this paper we compare the equivalent widths of Halpha, [OII], [NII], Hbeta, and [OIII] of void and wall galaxies of similar luminosities and find that void galaxies have larger values, indicating that they are still forming stars at a high rate. A comparison of the Balmer break, as measured by the parameter Dn(4000), reveals that void galaxies have younger stellar populations than wall galaxies. Using standard techniques, we estimate Halpha and [OII] star formation rates of the void and wall galaxies and along with estimates of the stellar masses, we compute specific star formation rates. In most cases, we find that void galaxies have similar SFRs to wall galaxies but they are fainter and smaller mass. This means that, consistent with the EWs, void galaxies have higher specific star formation rates than wall galaxies.
  • Wide-angle, moderately deep redshift surveys such as that conducted as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) allow study of the relationship between the structural elements of the large-scale distribution of galaxies -- including groups, cluster, superclusters, and voids -- and the dependence of galaxy formation and evolution on these enviroments. We present a progress report on mapping efforts with the SDSS and discuss recently constructed catalogs of clusters, voids, and void galaxies, and evidence for a 420Mpc/h supercluster or ``Great Wall.'' Analysis of multi-band photometry and moderate-resolution spectroscopy from the SDSS reveals environmental dependence of the star formation history of galaxies that extends over more than a factor of 100 in density, from clusters all the way to the deep interiors of voids. On average, galaxies in the rarified environments of voids exhibit bluer colors, higher specific star formation rates, lower dust content, and more disk-like morphology than objects in denser regions. This trend persists in comparisons of samples in low vs. high-density regions with similar luminosity and morphology, thus this dependence is not simply an extension of the morphology-density relation. Large-scale modulation of the halo mass function and the temperature of the intergalactic medium might explain this dependence of galaxy evolution on the large-scale environment.
  • We present estimates of cosmological parameters from the application of the Karhunen-Loeve transform to the analysis of the 3D power spectrum of density fluctuations using Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy redshifts. We use Omega_m*h and f_b = Omega_b/Omega_m to describe the shape of the power spectrum, sigma8 for the (linearly extrapolated) normalization, and beta to parametrize linear theory redshift space distortions. On scales k < 0.16 h/Mpc, our maximum likelihood values are Omega_m*h = 0.264 +/-0.043, f_b = 0.286 +/- 0.065, sigma8 = 0.966 +/- 0.048, and beta = 0.45 +/- 0.12. When we take a prior on Omega_b from WMAP, we find Omega_m*h = 0.207 +/- 0.030, which is in excellent agreement with WMAP and 2dF. This indicates that we have reasonably measured the gross shape of the power spectrum but we have difficulty breaking the degeneracy between Omega_m*h and f_b because the baryon oscillations are not resolved in the current spectroscopic survey window function.
  • We present a novel method for simulation of the interior of large cosmic voids, suitable for study of the formation and evolution of objects lying within such regions. Following Birkhoff's theorem, void regions dynamically evolve as universes with cosmological parameters that depend on the underdensity of the void. We derive the values of $\Omega_M$, $\Omega_{\Lambda}$, and $H_0$ that describe this evolution. We examine how the growth rate of structure and scale factor in a void differ from the background universe. Together with a prescription for the power spectrum of fluctuations, these equations provide the initial conditions for running specialized void simulations. The increased efficiency of such simulations, in comparison with general-purpose simulations, allows an improvement of upwards of twenty in the mass resolution. As a sanity check, we run a moderate resolution simulation ($N=128^3$ particles) and confirm that the resulting mass function of void halos is consistent with other theoretical and numerical models.