• We analyse the homotopy types of gauge groups of principal U(n)-bundles associated to pseudo Real vector bundles in the sense of Atiyah. We provide satisfactory homotopy decompositions of these gauge groups into factors in which the homotopy groups are well known. Therefore, we substantially build upon the low dimensional homotopy groups as provided in a paper by I. Biswas, J. Huisman, and J. Hurtubise.
  • We present an extensive spectroscopic follow-up campaign of 29 strong lensing (SL) selected galaxy clusters discovered primarily in the Second Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS-2). Our spectroscopic analysis yields redshifts for 52 gravitational arcs present in the core of our galaxy clusters, which correspond to 35 distinct background sources that are clearly distorted by the gravitational potential of these clusters. These lensed galaxies span a wide redshift range of $0.8 \le z \le 2.9$, with a median redshift of $z_s = 1.8 \pm 0.1 $. We also measure reliable redshifts for 1004 cluster members, allowing us to obtain robust velocity dispersion measurements for 23 of these clusters, which we then use to determine their dynamical masses by using a simulation-based $\sigma_{DM} - M_{200}$ scaling relation. The redshift and mass ranges covered by our SL sample are $0.22 \le z \le 1.01$ and $5 \times10^{13} \le M_{200}/h^{-1}_{70}M_{\odot} \le 1.9\times10^{15}$, respectively. We analyze and quantify some possible effects that might bias our mass estimates, such as the presence of substructure, the region where cluster members are selected for spectroscopic follow-up, the final number of confirmed members, and line-of-sight effects. We find that 10 clusters of our sample with $N_{mem} \gtrsim 20$ show signs of dynamical substructure. However, the velocity data of only one system is inconsistent with a uni-modal distribution. We therefore assume that the substructures are only marginal and not of comparable size to the clusters themselves. Consequently, our velocity dispersion and mass estimates can be used as priors for SL mass reconstruction studies and also represent an important step toward a better understanding of the properties of the SL galaxy cluster population.
  • We use the HB morphology of 48 Galactic GCs to study the radial distributions of the different stellar populations known to exist in globular clusters. Assuming that the (extremely) blue HB stars correspond to stars enriched in Helium and light elements, we compare the radial distributions of stars selected according to colour on the HB to trace the distribution of the secondary stellar populations in globular clusters. Unlike other cases, our data show that the populations are well mixed in 80% of the cases studied. This provides some constraints on the mechanisms proposed to pollute the interstellar medium in young globular clusters.
  • The XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) is a serendipitous search for galaxy clusters using all publicly available data in the XMM-Newton Science Archive. Its main aims are to measure cosmological parameters and trace the evolution of X-ray scaling relations. In this paper we present the first data release from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS-DR1). This consists of 503 optically confirmed, serendipitously detected, X-ray clusters. Of these clusters, 255 are new to the literature and 356 are new X-ray discoveries. We present 464 clusters with a redshift estimate (0.06 < z < 1.46), including 261 clusters with spectroscopic redshifts. In addition, we have measured X-ray temperatures (Tx) for 402 clusters (0.4 < Tx < 14.7 keV). We highlight seven interesting subsamples of XCS-DR1 clusters: (i) 10 clusters at high redshift (z > 1.0, including a new spectroscopically-confirmed cluster at z = 1.01); (ii) 67 clusters with high Tx (> 5 keV); (iii) 131 clusters/groups with low Tx (< 2 keV); (iv) 27 clusters with measured Tx values in the SDSS `Stripe 82' co-add region; (v) 78 clusters with measured Tx values in the Dark Energy Survey region; (vi) 40 clusters detected with sufficient counts to permit mass measurements (under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium); (vii) 105 clusters that can be used for applications such as the derivation of cosmological parameters and the measurement of cluster scaling relations. The X-ray analysis methodology used to construct and analyse the XCS-DR1 cluster sample has been presented in a companion paper, Lloyd-Davies et al. (2010).
  • The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey consists of HST ACS imaging for 100 early-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, observed in the F475W and F850LP filters. We derive distances for 84 of these galaxies using the method of surface brightness fluctuations (SBFs), present the SBF distance catalog, and use this database to examine the three-dimensional distribution of early-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. The SBF distance moduli have a mean (random) measurement error of 0.07 mag (0.5 Mpc), or roughly 3 times better than previous SBF measurements for Virgo Cluster galaxies. Five galaxies lie at a distance of ~23 Mpc and are members of the W' cloud. The remaining 79 galaxies have a narrow distribution around our adopted mean distance of 16.5+/-0.1 (random mean error) +/-1.1 Mpc (systematic). The rms distance scatter of this sample is 0.6+/-0.1 Mpc, with little dependence on morphological type or luminosity class (i.e., 0.7+/-0.1 and 0.5+/-0.1 Mpc for the giants and dwarfs, respectively). The back-to-front depth of the cluster measured from our sample of galaxies is 2.4+/-0.4 Mpc (i.e., +/-2sigma of the intrinsic distance distribution). The M87 (cluster A) and M49 (cluster B) subclusters are found to lie at distances of 16.7+/-0.2 and 16.4+/-0.2 Mpc, respectively. There may be a third subcluster associated with M86. A weak correlation between velocity and line-of-sight distance may be a faint echo of the cluster velocity distribution not having yet completely virialized. In three dimensions, Virgo's early-type galaxies appear to define a slightly triaxial distribution, with axis ratios of (1:0.7:0.5). The principal axis of the best-fit ellipsoid is inclined ~20-40 deg. from the line of sight, while the galaxies belonging to the W' cloud lie on an axis inclined by ~10-15 deg.