• The automation of operations is essential to reduce manpower costs and improve the reliability of the system. The Site Status Board (SSB) is a framework which allows Virtual Organizations to monitor their computing activities at distributed sites and to evaluate site performance. The ATLAS experiment intensively uses the SSB for the distributed computing shifts, for estimating data processing and data transfer efficiencies at a particular site, and for implementing automatic exclusion of sites from computing activities, in case of potential problems. The ATLAS SSB provides a real-time aggregated monitoring view and keeps the history of the monitoring metrics. Based on this history, usability of a site from the perspective of ATLAS is calculated. The paper will describe how the SSB is integrated in the ATLAS operations and computing infrastructure and will cover implementation details of the ATLAS SSB sensors and alarm system, based on the information in the SSB. It will demonstrate the positive impact of the use of the SSB on the overall performance of ATLAS computing activities and will overview future plans.
  • We demonstrate the behavior of three balls skipping off of the water surface: a Superball, a racquetball, and a water bouncing ball (Waboba). The three balls have rebound coefficients of 0.9, 0.8 and 0.2, respectively. However, we notice that the Waboba bounces better than the others, but why? The Superball has a high coefficient of restitution, creating large rebounds. Here the impact is angled to the free surface, but the inelastic response and large mass ratio forces the ball underwater without skipping. The racquetball has a lower mass ratio and a more elastic response to impacts. Also thrown at a shallow angle, it bounces off of the surface of the water 1-3 times before coming to rest. The Waboba flattens inside the cavity allowing it to skip off of the surface more easily. The flattened ball looks more like a skipping stone than a sphere due to its large elastic deformation at impact. Examining the reaction of a skipping stone we see that the stone creates a cavity in which it planes, slipping out of it with some upward velocity. The Waboba behaves like a skipping stone planing on the surface of the water, allowing it to bounce upwards of 20 times and traveling nearly 60 meters. While some skill is needed to throw the Waboba across a pond, It adapts to each skip because of its elastic response, whereas the stone must be thrown perfectly in order to gain the best skipping advantage.