• We propose a method to probe the local density of states (LDOS) of atomic systems that provides both spatial and energy resolution. The method combines atomic and tunneling techniques to supply a simple, yet quantitative and operational, definition of the LDOS for both interacting and non-interacting systems: It is the rate at which particles can be siphoned from the system of interest by a narrow energy band of non-interacting states contacted locally to the many-body system of interest. Ultracold atoms in optical lattices are a natural platform for implementing this broad concept to visualize the energy and spatial dependence of the atom density in interacting, inhomogeneous lattices. This includes models of strongly correlated condensed matter systems, as well as ones with non-trivial topologies.
  • The lack of an engaging pedagogy and the highly competitive atmosphere in introductory science courses tend to discourage students from pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors. Once in a STEM field, academic and social integration has been long thought to be important for students' persistence. Yet, it is rarely investigated. In particular, the relative impact of in-class and out-of-class interactions remains an open issue. Here, we demonstrate that, surprisingly, for students whose grades fall in the "middle of the pack," the out-of-class network is the most significant predictor of persistence. To do so, we use logistic regression combined with Akaike's information criterion to assess in- and out-of-class networks, grades, and other factors. For students with grades at the very top (and bottom), final grade, unsurprisingly, is the best predictor of persistence---these students are likely already committed (or simply restricted from continuing) so they persist (or drop out). For intermediate grades, though, only out-of-class closeness---a measure of one's immersion in the network---helps predict persistence. This does not negate the need for in-class ties. However, it suggests that, in this cohort, only students that get past the convenient in-class interactions and start forming strong bonds outside of class are or become committed to their studies. Since many students are lost through attrition, our results suggest practical routes for increasing students' persistence in STEM majors.
  • Access resistance indicates how well current carriers from a bulk medium can converge to a pore or opening, and is an important concept in nanofluidic devices and in cell physiology. In simplified scenarios, when the bulk dimensions are infinite in all directions, it depends only on the resistivity and pore radius. These conditions are not valid in all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of transport, due to the computational cost of large simulation cells, and can even break down in micro- and nano-scale systems due to strong confinement. Here, we examine a scaling theory for the access resistance that predicts a special simulation cell aspect ratio -- the golden aspect ratio -- where finite size effects are eliminated. Using both continuum and all-atom simulations, we demonstrate that this golden aspect ratio exists and that it takes on a universal value in linear response and moderate concentrations. Outside of linear response, it gains an apparent dependence on characteristics of the transport scenario (concentration, voltages, etc.) for small simulation cells, but this dependence vanishes at larger length scales. These results will enable the use of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study contextual properties of access resistance -- its dependence on protein and molecular-scale fluctuations, the presence of charges, and other functional groups -- and yield the opportunity to quantitatively compare computed and measured resistances.
  • Single-molecule sensing is at the core of modern biophysics and nanoscale science, from revolutionizing healthcare through rapid, low-cost sequencing to understanding various physical, chemical, and biological processes at their most basic level. However, important processes at the molecular scale are often too fast for the detection bandwidth or otherwise outside the detection sensitivity. Moreover, most envisioned biophysical applications are at room temperature, which further limits detection due to significant thermal noise. Here, we theoretically demonstrate reliable transduction of forces into electronic currents via locally suspended graphene nanoribbons subject to ultra-low flexural deflection. The decay of electronic couplings with distance magnifies the effect of the deflection, giving rise to measurable electronic current changes even in aqueous solution. Due to thermal fluctuations, the characteristic charge carrier transmission peak follows a generalized Voigt profile, behavior which is reflected in the optimized sensor. The intrinsic sensitivity is less than 7 fN/$\sqrt{\mathbf{Hz}}$, allowing for the detection of ultra-weak and fast processes at room temperature. Graphene deflectometry thus presents new opportunities in the sensing and detection of molecular-scale processes, from ion dynamics to DNA sequencing and protein folding, in their native environment.
  • Topological effects typically discussed in the context of quantum physics are emerging as one of the central paradigms of physics. Here, we demonstrate the role of topology in energy transport through dimerized micro- and nano-mechanical lattices in the classical regime, i.e., essentially "masses and springs". We show that the thermal conductance factorizes into topological and non-topological components. The former takes on three discrete values and arises due to the appearance of edge modes that prevent good contact between the heat reservoirs and the bulk, giving a length-independent reduction of the conductance. In essence, energy input at the boundary mostly stays there, an effect robust against disorder and nonlinearity. These results bridge two seemingly disconnected disciplines of physics, namely topology and thermal transport, and suggest ways to engineer thermal contacts, opening a direction to explore the ramifications of topological properties on nanoscale technology.
  • The resistance due to the convergence from bulk to a constriction, for example, a nanopore, is a mainstay of transport phenomena. In classical electrical conduction, Maxwell, and later Hall for ionic conduction, predicted this access or convergence resistance to be independent of the bulk dimensions and inversely dependent on the pore radius, $a$, for a perfectly circular pore. More generally, though, this resistance is contextual, it depends on the presence of functional groups/charges and fluctuations, as well as the (effective) constriction geometry/dimensions. Addressing the context generically requires all-atom simulations, but this demands enormous resources due to the algebraically decaying nature of convergence. We develop a finite-size scaling analysis, reminiscent of the treatment of critical phenomena, that makes the convergence resistance accessible in such simulations. This analysis suggests that there is a "golden aspect ratio" for the simulation cell that yields the infinite system result with a finite system. We employ this approach to resolve the experimental and theoretical discrepancies in the radius-dependence of graphene nanopore resistance.
  • Open-system approaches are gaining traction in the simulation of charge transport in nanoscale and molecular electronic devices. In particular, "extended reservoir" simulations, where explicit reservoir degrees of freedom are present, allow for the computation of both real-time and steady-state properties but require relaxation of the extended reservoirs. The strength of this relaxation, $\gamma$, influences the conductance, giving rise to a "turnover" behavior analogous to Kramers' turnover in chemical reaction rates. We derive explicit, general expressions for the weak and strong relaxation limits. For weak relaxation, the conductance increases linearly with $\gamma$ and every electronic state of the total explicit system contributes to the electronic current according to its "reduced" weight in the two extended reservoir regions. Essentially, this represents two conductors in series -- one at each interface with the implicit reservoirs that provide the relaxation. For strong relaxation, a "dual" expression -- one with the same functional form -- results, except now proportional to $1/\gamma$ and dependent on the system of interest's electronic states, reflecting that the strong relaxation is localizing electrons in the extended reservoirs. Higher order behavior (e.g., $\gamma^2$ or $1/\gamma^2$) can occur when there is a gap in the frequency spectrum. Moreover, inhomogeneity in the frequency spacing can give rise to a pseudo-plateau regime. These findings yield a physically motivated approach to diagnosing numerical simulations and understanding the influence of relaxation, and we examine their occurrence in both simple models and a realistic, fluctuating graphene nanoribbon.
  • Master equations are increasingly popular for the simulation of time-dependent electronic transport in nanoscale devices. Several recent Markovian approaches use "extended reservoirs" - explicit degrees of freedom associated with the electrodes - distinguishing them from many previous classes of master equations. Starting from a Lindblad equation, we develop a common foundation for these approaches. Due to the incorporation of explicit electrode states, these methods do not require a large bias or even "true Markovianity" of the reservoirs. Nonetheless, their predictions are only physically relevant when the Markovian relaxation is weaker than the thermal broadening and when the extended reservoirs are "sufficiently large," in a sense that we quantify. These considerations hold despite complete positivity and respect for Pauli exclusion at any relaxation strength.
  • Selective ion transport is a hallmark of biological ion channel behavior but is a major challenge to engineer into artificial membranes. Here, we demonstrate, with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, that bare graphene nanopores yield measurable ion selectivity that varies over one to two orders of magnitude simply by changing the pore radius and number of graphene layers. Monolayer graphene does not display dehydration-induced selectivity until the pore radius is small enough to exclude the first hydration layer from inside the pore. Bi- and tri-layer graphene, though, display such selectivity already for a pore size that barely encroaches on the first hydration layer, which is due to the more significant water loss from the second hydration layer. Measurement of selectivity and activation barriers from both first and second hydration layer barriers will help elucidate the behavior of biological ion channels. Moreover, the energy barriers responsible for selectivity -- while small on the scale of hydration energies -- are already relatively large, i.e., many $k_B$. For separation of ions from water, therefore, one can exchange longer, larger radius pores for shorter, smaller radius pores, giving a practical method for maintaining exclusion efficiency while enhancing other properties (e.g., water throughput).
  • During the catalytic synthesis of graphene, nanotubes, fibers, and other nanostructures, many intriguing phenomena occur, such as phase separation, precipitation, and analogs of capillary action. We demonstrate that catalytic nanoparticles display metastable states that influence growth, reminiscent of some protein ensembles in vivo. As a carbon nanostructure grows, the nanoparticle elongates due to an energetically favorable metal-carbon interaction that overrides the surface energy increase of the metal. The formation of subsequent nested tubes, however, drives up the particle's free energy, but the particle remains trapped until an accessible free energy surface allows it to exit the tube. During this time, the nanoparticle continues to catalyze tube growth internally within the nested structure. This nonequilibrium thermodynamic cycle of elongation and retraction is heavily influenced by tapering of the structure, which, ultimately, determines the final product and catalyst lifetime. Our results provide a unifying framework to interpret similar phenomena for other catalytic reactions, such as during CO oxidation, and suggest routes to the practical optimization of such processes.
  • Ion channels play a key role in regulating cell behavior and in electrical signaling. In these settings, polar and charged functional groups -- as well as protein response -- compensate for dehydration in an ion-dependent way, giving rise to the ion selective transport critical to the operation of cells. Dehydration, though, yields ion-dependent free-energy barriers and thus is predicted to give rise to selectivity by itself. However, these barriers are typically so large that they will suppress the ion currents to undetectable levels. Here, we establish that graphene displays a measurable dehydration-only mechanism for selectivity of $\mathrm{K}^+$ over $\mathrm{Cl}^-$. This fundamental mechanism -- one that depends only on the geometry and hydration -- is the starting point for selectivity for all channels and pores. Moreover, while we study selectivity of $\mathrm{K}^+$ over $\mathrm{Cl}^-$, we find that dehydration-based selectivity functions for all ions, i.e., cation over cation selectivity (e.g., $\mathrm{K}^+$ over $\mathrm{Na}^+$). Its likely detection in graphene pores resolves conflicting experimental results, as well as presents a new paradigm for characterizing the operation of ion channels and engineering molecular/ionic selectivity in filtration and other applications.
  • The objective, classical world emerges from the underlying quantum substrate via the proliferation of redundant copies of selected information into the environment, which acts as a communication channel, transmitting that information to observers. These copies are independently accessible, allowing many observers to reach consensus about the state of a quantum system via its imprints in the environment. Quantum Darwinism recognizes that the redundancy of information is thus central to the emergence of objective reality in the quantum world. However, in addition to the "quantum system of interest," there are many other systems "of no interest" in the Universe that can imprint information on the common environment. There is therefore a danger that the information of interest will be diluted with irrelevant bits, suppressing the redundancy responsible for objectivity. We show that mixing of the relevant (the "wheat") and irrelevant (the "chaff") bits of information makes little quantitative difference to the redundancy of the information of interest. Thus, we demonstrate that it does not matter whether one separates the relevant information) from the (irrelevant) chaff: The large redundancy of the relevant information survives dilution, providing evidence of the objective, effectively classical world.
  • Photoelectron emission microscopy PEEM is a powerful tool to spectroscopically image dynamic surface processes at the nanoscale but is traditionally limited to ultra high or moderate vacuum conditions. Here, we develop a novel grapheme capped multichannel array sample platform that extends the capabilities of photoelectron spectromicroscopy to routine liquid and atmospheric pressure studies with standard PEEM setups. Using this platform, we show that graphene has only a minor influence on the electronic structure of water in the first few layers and thus will allow for the examination of minimally perturbed aqueous phase interfacial dynamics. Analogous to microarray screening technology in biomedical research, our platform is highly suitable for applications in tandem with large-scale data mining, pattern recognition, and combinatorial methods for spectro temporal and spatiotemporal analyses at solid liquid interfaces. Using Bayesian linear unmixing algorithm, we were able to discriminate between different X-ray induced water radiolysis scenarios and observe a metastable wetting intermediate water layer during the late stages of bubble formationformation
  • The double slit experiment provides a classic example of both interference and the effect of observation in quantum physics. When particles are sent individually through a pair of slits, a wave-like interference pattern develops, but no such interference is found when one observes which "path" the particles take. We present a model of interference, dephasing, and measurement-induced decoherence in a one-dimensional version of the double-slit experiment. Using this model, we demonstrate how the loss of interference in the system is correlated with the information gain by the measuring apparatus/observer. In doing so, we give a modern account of measurement in this paradigmatic example of quantum physics that is accessible to students taking quantum mechanics at the graduate or senior undergraduate levels.
  • Motivated by the advances of quantum Darwinism and recognizing the role played by redundancy in identifying the small subset of quantum states with resilience characteristic of objective classical reality, we explore the implications of redundant records for consistent histories. The consistent histories formalism is a tool for describing sequences of events taking place in an evolving closed quantum system. A set of histories is consistent when one can reason about them using Boolean logic, i.e., when probabilities of sequences of events that define histories are additive. However, the vast majority of the sets of histories that are merely consistent are flagrantly non-classical in other respects. This embarras de richesses (known as the set selection problem) suggests that one must go beyond consistency to identify how the classical past arises in our quantum Universe. The key intuition we follow is that the records of events that define the familiar objective past are inscribed in many distinct systems, e.g., subsystems of the environment, and are accessible locally in space and time to observers. We identify histories that are not just consistent but redundantly consistent using the partial-trace condition introduced by Finkelstein as a bridge between histories and decoherence. The existence of redundant records is a sufficient condition for redundant consistency. It selects, from the multitude of the alternative sets of consistent histories, a small subset endowed with redundant records characteristic of the objective classical past. The information about an objective history of the past is then simultaneously within reach of many, who can independently reconstruct it and arrive at compatible conclusions in the present.
  • Landauer's formula is the standard theoretical tool to examine ballistic transport in nano- and meso-scale junctions, but it necessitates that any variation of the junction with time must be slow compared to characteristic times of the system, e.g., the relaxation time of local excitations. Transport through structurally dynamic junctions is, however, increasingly of interest for sensing, harnessing fluctuations, and real-time control. Here, we calculate the steady-state current when relaxation of electrons in the reservoirs is present and demonstrate that it gives rise to three regimes of behavior: weak relaxation gives a contact-limited current; strong relaxation localizes electrons, distorting their natural dynamics and reducing the current; and in an intermediate regime the Landauer view of the system only is recovered. We also demonstrate that a simple equation of motion emerges, which is suitable for efficiently simulating time-dependent transport.
  • Quantum Darwinism recognizes the role of the environment as a communication channel: Decoherence can selectively amplify information about the pointer states of a system of interest (preventing access to complementary information about their superpositions) and can make records of this information accessible to many observers. This redundancy explains the emergence of objective, classical reality in our quantum Universe. Here, we demonstrate that the amplification of information in realistic spin environments can be quantified by the quantum Chernoff information, which characterizes the distinguishability of partial records in individual environment subsystems. We show that, except for a set of initial states of measure zero, the environment always acquires redundant information. Moreover, the Chernoff information captures the rich behavior of amplification in both finite and infinite spin environments, from quadratic growth of the redundancy to oscillatory behavior. These results will considerably simplify experimental testing of quantum Darwinism, e.g., using nitrogen vacancies in diamond.
  • Kramers' theory frames chemical reaction rates in solution as reactants overcoming a barrier in the presence of friction and noise. For weak coupling to the solution, the reaction rate is limited by the rate at which the solution can restore equilibrium after a subset of reactants have surmounted the barrier to become products. For strong coupling, there are always sufficiently energetic reactants. However, the solution returns many of the intermediate states back to the reactants before the product fully forms. Here, we demonstrate that the thermal conductance displays an analogous physical response to the friction and noise that drive the heat current through a material or structure. A crossover behavior emerges where the thermal reservoirs dominate the conductance at the extremes and only in the intermediate region are the intrinsic properties of the lattice manifest. Not only does this shed new light on Kramers' classic turnover problem, this result is significant for the design of devices for thermal management and other applications, as well as the proper simulation of transport at the nanoscale.
  • We compare the Landauer, Kubo, and microcanonical [J. Phys. Cond. Matter {\bf 16}, 8025 (2004)] approaches to quantum transport for the average current, the entanglement entropy and the semiclassical full-counting statistics (FCS). Our focus is on the applicability of these approaches to isolated quantum systems such as ultra-cold atoms in engineered optical potentials. For two lattices connected by a junction, we find that the current and particle number fluctuations from the microcanonical approach compare well with the values predicted by the Landauer formalism and FCS assuming a binomial distribution. However, we demonstrate that well-defined reservoirs (i.e., particles in Fermi-Dirac distributions) are not present for a substantial duration of the quasi-steady state. Thus, the Landauer assumption of reservoirs and/or inelastic effects is not necessary for establishing a quasi-steady state. Maintaining such a state indefinitely requires an infinite system, and in this limit well-defined Fermi-Dirac distributions can occur. A Kubo approach -- in the spirit of the microcanonical picture -- bridges the gap between the two formalisms, giving explicit analytical expressions for the formation of the steady state. The microcanonical formalism is designed for closed, finite-size quantum systems and is thus more suitable for studying particle dynamics in ultra-cold atoms. Our results highlight both the connection and differences with more traditional approaches to calculating transport properties in condensed matter systems, and will help guide the way to their simulations in cold-atom systems.
  • Amplification was regarded, since the early days of quantum theory, as a mysterious ingredient that endows quantum microstates with macroscopic consequences, key to the "collapse of the wavepacket", and a way to avoid embarrassing problems exemplified by Schr\"odinger's cat. Such a bridge between the quantum microworld and the classical world of our experience was postulated ad hoc in the Copenhagen Interpretation. Quantum Darwinism views amplification as replication, in many copies, of the information about quantum states. We show that such amplification is a natural consequence of a broad class of models of decoherence, including the photon environment we use to obtain most of our information. This leads to objective reality via the presence of robust and widely accessible records of selected quantum states. The resulting redundancy (the number of copies deposited in the environment) follows from the Quantum Chernoff Information that quantifies the information transmitted by a typical elementary subsystem of the environment.
  • The study of time-dependent, many-body transport phenomena is increasingly within reach of ultra-cold atom experiments. We show that the introduction of spatially inhomogeneous interactions, e.g., generated by optically-controlled collisions, induce negative differential conductance in the transport of atoms in 1D optical lattices. Specifically, we simulate the dynamics of interacting fermionic atoms via a micro-canonical transport formalism within both mean-field and a higher-order approximation, as well as with time-dependent DMRG. For weakly repulsive interactions, a quasi steady-state atomic current develops that is similar to the situation occurring for electronic systems subject to an external voltage bias. At the mean-field level, we find that this atomic current is robust against the details of how the interaction is switched on. Further, a conducting-to-nonconducting transition exists when the interaction imbalance exceeds some threshold from both our approximate and time-dependent DMRG simulations. This transition is preceded by the atomic equivalent of negative differential conductivity observed in transport across solid-state structures.
  • The sum of the Holevo quantity (that bounds the capacity of quantum channels to transmit classical information about an observable) and the quantum discord (a measure of the quantumness of correlations of that observable) yields an observable-independent total given by the quantum mutual information. This split naturally delineates information about quantum systems accessible to observers -- information that is redundantly transmitted by the environment -- while showing that it is maximized for the quasi-classical pointer observable. Other observables are accessible only via correlations with the pointer observable. Further, we prove an anti-symmetry property relating accessible information and discord. It shows that information becomes objective -- accessible to many observers -- only as quantum information is relegated to correlations with the global environment, and, therefore, locally inaccessible. The resulting complementarity explains why, in a quantum Universe, we perceive objective classical reality while flagrantly quantum superpositions are out of reach.
  • A state selected at random from the Hilbert space of a many-body system is overwhelmingly likely to exhibit highly non-classical correlations. For these typical states, half of the environment must be measured by an observer to determine the state of a given subsystem. The objectivity of classical reality-the fact that multiple observers can agree on the state of a subsystem after measuring just a small fraction of its environment-implies that the correlations found in nature between macroscopic systems and their environments are very exceptional. Building on previous studies of quantum Darwinism showing that highly redundant branching states are produced ubiquitously during pure decoherence, we examine conditions needed for the creation of branching states and study their demise through many-body interactions. We show that even constrained dynamics can suppress redundancy to the values typical of random states on relaxation timescales, and prove that these results hold exactly in the thermodynamic limit.
  • Novel approaches to DNA sequencing and detection require the measurement of electrical currents between metal probes immersed in ionic solution. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that these systems maintain large background currents with a transient response that decays very slowly in time and noise that increases with ionic concentration. Using a non-equilibrium stochastic model, we obtain an analytical expression for the ionic current that shows these results are due to a fast electrochemical reaction at the electrode surface followed by the slow formation of a diffusion layer. During the latter, ions translocate in the weak electric field generated after the initial rapid screening of the strong fields near the electrode surfaces. Our theoretical results are in very good agreement with experimental findings.
  • DNA has a well-defined structural transition -- the denaturation of its double-stranded form into two single strands -- that strongly affects its thermal transport properties. We show that, according to a widely implemented model for DNA denaturation, one can engineer DNA "heattronic" devices that have a rapidly increasing thermal conductance over a narrow temperature range across the denaturation transition (~350 K). The origin of this rapid increase of conductance, or "switching", is the softening of the lattice and suppression of nonlinear effects as the temperature crosses the transition temperature and DNA denatures. Most importantly, we demonstrate that DNA nanojunctions have a broad range of thermal tunability due to varying the sequence and length, and exploiting the underlying nonlinear behavior. We discuss the role of disorder in the base sequence, as well as the relation to genomic DNA. These results set the basis for developing thermal devices out of materials with nonlinear structural dynamics, as well as understanding the underlying mechanisms of DNA denaturation.