• Abelian periodicity of strings has been studied extensively over the last years. In 2006 Constantinescu and Ilie defined the abelian period of a string and several algorithms for the computation of all abelian periods of a string were given. In contrast to the classical period of a word, its abelian version is more flexible, factors of the word are considered the same under any internal permutation of their letters. We show two O(|y|^2) algorithms for the computation of all abelian periods of a string y. The first one maps each letter to a suitable number such that each factor of the string can be identified by the unique sum of the numbers corresponding to its letters and hence abelian periods can be identified easily. The other one maps each letter to a prime number such that each factor of the string can be identified by the unique product of the numbers corresponding to its letters and so abelian periods can be identified easily. We also define weak abelian periods on strings and give an O(|y|log(|y|)) algorithm for their computation, together with some other algorithms for more basic problems.
  • We consider the problem of finding quasiperiodicities in a Fibonacci string. A factor u of a string y is a cover of y if every letter of y falls within some occurrence of u in y. A string v is a seed of y, if it is a cover of a superstring of y. A left seed of a string y is a prefix of y that it is a cover of a superstring of y. Similarly a right seed of a string y is a suffix of y that it is a cover of a superstring of y. In this paper, we present some interesting results regarding quasiperiodicities in Fibonacci strings, we identify all covers, left/right seeds and seeds of a Fibonacci string and all covers of a circular Fibonacci string.
  • The notion of the cover is a generalization of a period of a string, and there are linear time algorithms for finding the shortest cover. The seed is a more complicated generalization of periodicity, it is a cover of a superstring of a given string, and the shortest seed problem is of much higher algorithmic difficulty. The problem is not well understood, no linear time algorithm is known. In the paper we give linear time algorithms for some of its versions --- computing shortest left-seed array, longest left-seed array and checking for seeds of a given length. The algorithm for the last problem is used to compute the seed array of a string (i.e., the shortest seeds for all the prefixes of the string) in $O(n^2)$ time. We describe also a simpler alternative algorithm computing efficiently the shortest seeds. As a by-product we obtain an $O(n\log{(n/m)})$ time algorithm checking if the shortest seed has length at least $m$ and finding the corresponding seed. We also correct some important details missing in the previously known shortest-seed algorithm (Iliopoulos et al., 1996).