• Recently, IBM has made available a quantum computer provided with 16 qubits, denoted as IBM Q16. Previously, only a 5 qubit device, denoted as Q5, was available. Both IBM devices can be used to run quantum programs, by means of a cloud-based platform. In this paper, we illustrate our experience with IBM Q16 in demonstrating entanglement assisted invariance, also known as envariance, and parity learning by querying a uniform quantum example oracle. In particular, we illustrate the non-trivial strategy we have designed for compiling $n$-qubit quantum circuits ($n$ being an input parameter) on any IBM device, taking into account topological constraints.
  • In distributed systems based on the Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, quantum channels and quantum memories are used to establish entangled quantum states between node pairs. Such systems are robust against attackers that interact with the quantum channels. Conversely, weaknesses emerge when an attacker takes full control of a node and alters the configuration of the local quantum memory, either to make a denial-of-service attack or to reprogram the node. In such a scenario, entanglement verification over quantum memories is a means for detecting the intruder. Usually, entanglement verification approaches focus either on untrusted sources of entangled qubits (photons, in most cases) or on eavesdroppers that interfere with the quantum channel while entangled qubits are transmitted. Instead, in this work we assume that the source of entanglement is trusted, but parties may be dishonest. Looking for efficient entanglement verification protocols that only require classical channels and local quantum operations to work, we thoroughly analyze the one proposed by Nagy and Akl, that we denote as NA2010 for simplicity, and we define and analyze two entanglement verification protocols based on teleportation (denoted as AC1 and AC2), characterized by increasing efficiency in terms of intrusion detection probability versus sacrificed quantum resources.
  • Location-Based Services (LBSs) build upon geographic information to provide users with location-dependent functionalities. In such a context, it is particularly important that geographic locations claimed by users are the actual ones. Centralized verification approaches proposed in the last few years are not satisfactory, as they entail a high risk to the privacy of users. In this paper, we present and evaluate a novel decentralized, infrastructure-independent proof-of-location scheme based on the blockchain technology. Our scheme guarantees both location trustworthiness and user privacy preservation.
  • To design peer-to-peer (P2P) software systems is a challenging task, because of their highly decentralized nature, which may cause unexpected emergent global behaviors. The last fifteen years have seen many P2P applications to come out and win favor with millions of users. From success histories of applications like BitTorrent, Skype, MyP2P we have learnt a number of useful design patterns. Thus, in this article we present a P2P pattern language (shortly, P2P-PL) which encompasses all the aspects that a fully effective and efficient P2P software system should provide, namely consistency of stored data, redundancy, load balancing, coping with asymmetric bandwidth, decentralized security. The patterns of the proposed P2P-PL are described in detail, and a composition strategy for designing robust, effective and efficient P2P software systems is proposed.
  • Urban Traffic Management (UTM) topics have been tackled since long time, mainly by civil engineers and by city planners. The introduction of new communication technologies - such as cellular systems, satellite positioning systems and inter-vehicle communications - has significantly changed the way researchers deal with UTM issues. In this survey, we provide a review and a classification of how UTM has been addressed in the literature. We start from the recent achievements of "classical" approaches to urban traffic estimation and optimization, including methods based on the analysis of data collected by fixed sensors (e.g., cameras and radars), as well as methods based on information provided by mobile phones, such as Floating Car Data (FCD). Afterwards, we discuss urban traffic optimization, presenting the most recent works on traffic signal control and vehicle routing control. Then, after recalling the main concepts of Vehicular Ad-Hoc Networks (VANETs), we classify the different VANET-based approaches to UTM, according to three categories ("pure" VANETs, hybrid vehicular-sensor networks and hybrid vehicular-cellular networks), while illustrating the major research issues for each of them. The main objective of this survey is to provide a comprehensive view on UTM to researchers with focus on VANETs, in order to pave the way for the design and development of novel techniques for mitigating urban traffic problems, based on inter-vehicle communications.
  • Ultra-large scale (ULS) systems are becoming pervasive. They are inherently complex, which makes their design and control a challenge for traditional methods. Here we propose the design and analysis of ULS systems using measures of complexity, emergence, self-organization, and homeostasis based on information theory. These measures allow the evaluation of ULS systems and thus can be used to guide their design. We evaluate the proposal with a ULS computing system provided with adaptation mechanisms. We show the evolution of the system with stable and also changing workload, using different fitness functions. When the adaptive plan forces the system to converge to a predefined performance level, the nodes may result in highly unstable configurations, that correspond to a high variance in time of the measured complexity. Conversely, if the adaptive plan is less "aggressive", the system may be more stable, but the optimal performance may not be achieved.