• Period-luminosity (PL) sequences of long period variables (LPVs) are commonly interpreted as different pulsation modes, but there is disagreement on the modal assignment. Here, we re-examine the observed PL sequences in the Large Magellanic Cloud, including the sequence of long secondary periods (LSPs), and their associated pulsation modes. Firstly, we theoretically model the sequences using linear, radial, non-adiabatic pulsation models and a population synthesis model of the LMC red giants. Then, we use a semi-empirical approach to assign modes to the pulsation sequences by exploiting observed multi-mode pulsators. As a result of the combined approaches, we consistently find that sequences B and C$^{\prime}$ both correspond to first overtone pulsation, although there are some fundamental mode pulsators at low luminosities on both sequences. The masses of these fundamental mode pulsators are larger at a given luminosity than the mass of the first overtone pulsators. These two sequences B and C$^{\prime}$ are separated by a small period interval in which large amplitude pulsation in a long secondary period (sequence D variability) occurs, meaning that the first overtone pulsation is not seen as the primary mode of pulsation. Observationally, this leads to the splitting of the first overtone pulsation sequence into the two observed sequences B and C$^{\prime}$. Our two independent examinations also show that sequences A$^{\prime}$, A and C correspond to third overtone, second overtone and fundamental mode pulsation, respectively.
  • We introduce a new generation of PARSEC-COLIBRI stellar isochrones that include a detailed treatment of the thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase, and covering a wide range of initial metallicities (0.0001<Zi<0.06). Compared to previous releases, the main novelties and improvements are: use of new TP-AGB tracks and related atmosphere models and spectra for M and C-type stars; inclusion of the surface H+He+CNO abundances in the isochrone tables, accounting for the effects of diffusion, dredge-up episodes and hot-bottom burning; inclusion of complete thermal pulse cycles, with a complete description of the in-cycle changes in the stellar parameters; new pulsation models to describe the long-period variability in the fundamental and first overtone modes; new dust models that follow the growth of the grains during the AGB evolution, in combination with radiative transfer calculations for the reprocessing of the photospheric emission. Overall, these improvements are expected to lead to a more consistent and detailed description of properties of TP-AGB stars expected in resolved stellar populations, especially in regard to their mean photometric properties from optical to mid-infrared wavelengths. We illustrate the expected numbers of TP-AGB stars of different types in stellar populations covering a wide range of ages and initial metallicities, providing further details on the C-star island that appears at intermediate values of age and metallicity, and about the AGB-boosting effect that occurs at ages close to 1.6 Gyr for populations of all metallicities. The isochrones are available through a new dedicated web server.
  • Asteroseismic parameters allow us to measure the basic stellar properties of field giants observed far across the Galaxy. Most of such determinations are, up to now, based on simple scaling relations involving the large frequency separation, \Delta\nu, and the frequency of maximum power, \nu$_{max}$. In this work, we implement \Delta\nu\ and the period spacing, {\Delta}P, computed along detailed grids of stellar evolutionary tracks, into stellar isochrones and hence in a Bayesian method of parameter estimation. Tests with synthetic data reveal that masses and ages can be determined with typical precision of 5 and 19 per cent, respectively, provided precise seismic parameters are available. Adding independent information on the stellar luminosity, these values can decrease down to 3 and 10 per cent respectively. The application of these methods to NGC 6819 giants produces a mean age in agreement with those derived from isochrone fitting, and no evidence of systematic differences between RGB and RC stars. The age dispersion of NGC 6819 stars, however, is larger than expected, with at least part of the spread ascribable to stars that underwent mass-transfer events.