• Strong gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters has become a powerful tool for probing the high-redshift Universe, magnifying distant and faint background galaxies. Reliable strong lensing (SL) models are crucial for determining the intrinsic properties of distant, magnified sources and for constructing their luminosity function. We present here the first SL analysis of MACS J0308.9+2645 and PLCK G171.9-40.7, two massive galaxy clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope in the framework of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS). We use the Light-Traces-Mass modeling technique to uncover sets of multiply imaged galaxies and constrain the mass distribution of the clusters. Our SL analysis reveals that both clusters have particularly large Einstein radii ($\theta_E>30"$ for a source redshift of $z_s=2$), providing fairly large areas with high magnifications, useful for high-redshift galaxy searches ($\sim2$ arcmin$^{2}$ with $\mu>5$ to $\sim1$ arcmin$^{2}$ with $\mu>10$, similar to a typical \textit{Hubble Frontier Fields} cluster). We also find that MACS J0308.9+2645 hosts a promising, apparently bright (J$\sim23.2-24.6$ AB), multiply imaged high-redshift candidate at $z\sim6.4$. These images are amongst the brightest high-redshift candidates found in RELICS. Our mass models, including magnification maps, are made publicly available for the community through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.
  • Massive foreground galaxy clusters magnify and distort the light of objects behind them, permitting a view into both the extremely distant and intrinsically faint galaxy populations. We present here the z ~ 6 - 8 candidate high-redshift galaxies from the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS), a Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope survey of 41 massive galaxy clusters spanning an area of ~200 arcmin^2. These clusters were selected to be excellent lenses and we find similar high-redshift sample sizes and magnitude distributions as CLASH. We discover 321 candidate galaxies with photometric redshifts between z ~ 6 to z ~ 8, including extremely bright objects with H-band magnitudes of m_AB ~ 23 mag. As a sample, the observed (lensed) magnitudes of these galaxies are among the brightest known at z> 6, comparable to much wider, blank-field surveys. RELICS demonstrates the efficiency of using strong gravitational lenses to produce high-redshift samples in the epoch of reionization. These brightly observed galaxies are excellent targets for follow-up study with current and future observatories, including the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • Strong gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters magnifies background galaxies, enhancing our ability to discover statistically significant samples of galaxies at z>6, in order to constrain the high-redshift galaxy luminosity functions. Here, we present the first five lens models out of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS) Hubble Treasury Program, based on new HST WFC3/IR and ACS imaging of the clusters RXC J0142.9+4438, Abell 2537, Abell 2163, RXC J2211.7-0349, and ACT-CLJ0102-49151. The derived lensing magnification is essential for estimating the intrinsic properties of high-redshift galaxy candidates, and properly accounting for the survey volume. We report on new spectroscopic redshifts of multiply imaged lensed galaxies behind these clusters, which are used as constraints, and detail our strategy to reduce systematic uncertainties due to lack of spectroscopic information. In addition, we quantify the uncertainty on the lensing magnification due to statistical and systematic errors related to the lens modeling process, and find that in all but one cluster, the magnification is constrained to better than 20% in at least 80% of the field of view, including statistical and systematic uncertainties. The five clusters presented in this paper span the range of masses and redshifts of the clusters in the RELICS program. We find that they exhibit similar strong lensing efficiencies to the clusters targeted by the Hubble Frontier Fields within the WFC3/IR field of view. Outputs of the lens models are made available to the community through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes
  • Recent detections of Lyman alpha (Ly$\alpha$) emission from $z>7.5$ galaxies were somewhat unexpected given a dearth of previous non-detections in this era when the intergalactic medium (IGM) is still highly neutral. But these detections were from UV bright galaxies, which preferentially live in overdensities which reionize early, and have significantly Doppler-shifted Ly$\alpha$ line profiles emerging from their interstellar media (ISM), making them less affected by the global IGM state. Using a combination of reionization simulations and empirical ISM models we show, as a result of these two effects, UV bright galaxies in overdensities have $>2\times$ higher transmission through the $z\sim7$ IGM than typical field galaxies, and this boosted transmission is enhanced as the neutral fraction increases. The boosted transmission is not sufficient to explain the observed high Ly$\alpha$ fraction of $M_\mathrm{UV} \lesssim -22$ galaxies (Stark et al. 2017), suggesting Ly$\alpha$ emitted by these galaxies must be stronger than expected due to enhanced production and/or selection effects. Despite the bias of UV bright galaxies to reside in overdensities we show Ly$\alpha$ observations of such galaxies can accurately measure the global neutral hydrogen fraction, particularly when Ly$\alpha$ from UV faint galaxies is extinguished, making them ideal candidates for spectroscopic follow-up into the cosmic Dark Ages.
  • We present a strong-lensing analysis of four massive galaxy clusters imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope in the framework of the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS). We use a Light-Traces-Mass modeling technique to uncover sets of multiply imaged galaxies, and constrain the mass distribution and strong-lensing properties of the clusters. The mass models we present here are the first published for Abell S295 and MACS J0159.8-0849. For Abell 697 (the tenth-highest Sunyaev-Zel'dovich mass cluster in the Planck catalog) and MACS J0025.4-1222 (the "baby bullet" cluster), thanks to RELICS data we are able to improve upon previous models. Our analysis for MACS J0025.4-1222 and Abell S295 shows a bimodal mass distribution following the cluster galaxy concentrations, in support of the merger scenarios proposed in previous studies for these clusters. In addition, the updated model for MACS J0025.4-1222 suggests a substantially smaller critical area than previously estimated. For MACS J0159.8-0849 and Abell 697 we find a single peak and relatively regular morphology, suggesting these are fairly relaxed clusters. Despite being smaller and less prominent lenses on average, three of the four clusters we analyze here seem to have lensing strengths similar to the typical Hubble Frontier Fields cluster in terms of the cumulative area above a certain magnification value (e.g., A($\mu>5$) $\sim 1-3$ arcmin$^2$, A($\mu>10$) $\sim 0.5-1.5$ arcmin$^2$), which in part can be attributed to their merging configurations. We make our lens models publicly available through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes, including mass-density, deflection, shear and magnifications maps.
  • Despite recent observational efforts, unequivocal signs for the presence of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) in globular clusters (GCs) have not been found yet. Especially when the presence of IMBHs is constrained through dynamical modeling of stellar kinematics, it is fundamental to account for the displacement that the IMBH might have with respect to the GC centre. In this paper we analyse the IMBH wandering around the stellar density centre using a set of realistic direct N-body simulations of star cluster evolution. Guided by the simulation results, we develop a basic yet accurate model that can be used to estimate the average IMBH radial displacement ($\left<r_\mathrm{bh}\right>$) in terms of structural quantities as the core radius ($r_\mathrm{c}$), mass ($M_\mathrm{c}$), and velocity dispersion ($\sigma_\mathrm{c}$), in addition to the average stellar mass ($m_\mathrm{c}$) and the IMBH mass ($M_\mathrm{bh}$). The model can be expressed by the equation $\left<r_\mathrm{bh}\right>/r_\mathrm{c}=A(m_\mathrm{c}/M_\mathrm{bh})^\alpha[\sigma_\mathrm{c}^2r_\mathrm{c}/(GM_\mathrm{c})]^\beta$, in which the free parameters $A,\alpha,\beta$ are calculated through comparison with the numerical results on the IMBH displacement. The model is then applied to Galactic GCs, finding that for an IMBH mass equal to 0.1% of the GC mass, the typical expected displacement of a putative IMBH is around $1''$ for most Galactic GCs, but IMBHs can wander to larger angular distances in some objects, including a prediction of a $2.5''$ displacement for NGC 5139 ($\omega$ Cen), and $>10''$ for NGC 5053, NGC 6366 and ARP2.
  • We present a new flexible Bayesian framework for directly inferring the fraction of neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR, z~6-10) from detections and non-detections of Lyman Alpha (Ly$\alpha$) emission from Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). Our framework combines sophisticated reionization simulations with empirical models of the interstellar medium (ISM) radiative transfer effects on Ly$\alpha$. We assert that the Ly$\alpha$ line profile emerging from the ISM has an important impact on the resulting transmission of photons through the IGM, and that these line profiles depend on galaxy properties. We model this effect by considering the peak velocity offset of Ly$\alpha$ lines from host galaxies' systemic redshifts, which are empirically correlated with UV luminosity and redshift (or halo mass at fixed redshift). We use our framework on the sample of LBGs presented in Pentericci et al. (2014) and infer a global neutral fraction at z~7 of $\overline{x}_\mathrm{HI} = 0.59_{-0.15}^{+0.11}$, consistent with other robust probes of the EoR and confirming reionization is on-going ~700 Myr after the Big Bang. We show that using the full distribution of Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width detections and upper limits from LBGs places tighter constraints on the evolving IGM than the standard Ly$\alpha$ emitter fraction, and that larger samples are within reach of deep spectroscopic surveys of gravitationally lensed fields and JWST NIRSpec.
  • We present deep spectroscopic observations of a Lyman-break galaxy candidate (hereafter MACS1149-JD) at $z\sim9.5$ with the $\textit{Hubble}$ Space Telescope ($\textit{HST}$) WFC3/IR grisms. The grism observations were taken at 4 distinct position angles, totaling 34 orbits with the G141 grism, although only 19 of the orbits are relatively uncontaminated along the trace of MACS1149-JD. We fit a 3-parameter ($z$, F160W mag, and Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width) Lyman-break galaxy template to the three least contaminated grism position angles using an MCMC approach. The grism data alone are best fit with a redshift of $z_{\mathrm{grism}}=9.53^{+0.39}_{-0.60}$ ($68\%$ confidence), in good agreement with our photometric estimate of $z_{\mathrm{phot}}=9.51^{+0.06}_{-0.12}$ ($68\%$ confidence). Our analysis rules out Lyman-alpha emission from MACS1149-JD above a $3\sigma$ equivalent width of 21 \AA{}, consistent with a highly neutral IGM. We explore a scenario where the red $\textit{Spitzer}$/IRAC $[3.6] - [4.5]$ color of the galaxy previously pointed out in the literature is due to strong rest-frame optical emission lines from a very young stellar population rather than a 4000 \AA{} break. We find that while this can provide an explanation for the observed IRAC color, it requires a lower redshift ($z\lesssim9.1$), which is less preferred by the $\textit{HST}$ imaging data. The grism data are consistent with both scenarios, indicating that the red IRAC color can still be explained by a 4000 \AA{} break, characteristic of a relatively evolved stellar population. In this interpretation, the photometry indicate that a $340^{+29}_{-35}$ Myr stellar population is already present in this galaxy only $\sim500~\mathrm{Myr}$ after the Big Bang.
  • We discuss some of the key open questions regarding the formation and evolution of globular clusters (GCs) during galaxy formation and assembly within a cosmological framework. The current state-of-the-art for both observations and simulations is described, and we briefly mention directions for future research. The oldest GCs have ages $\ge$ 12.5 Gyr and formed around the time of reionisation. Resolved colour-magnitude diagrams of Milky Way GCs and direct imaging of lensed proto-GCs at z $\sim$ 6 with JWST promise further insight. Globular clusters are known to host multiple populations of stars with variations in their chemical abundances. Recently, such multiple populations have been detected in $\sim$2 Gyr old compact, massive star clusters. This suggests a common, single pathway for the formation of GCs at high and low redshift. The shape of the initial mass function for GCs remains unknown, however for massive galaxies a power-law mass function is favoured. Significant progress has been made recently modelling GC formation in the context of galaxy formation, with success in reproducing many of the observed GC-galaxy scaling relations.
  • The most distant galaxies known are at z~10-11, observed 400-500 Myr after the Big Bang. The few z~10-11 candidates discovered to date have been exceptionally small- barely resolved, if at all, by the Hubble Space Telescope. Here we present the discovery of SPT0615-JD, a fortuitous z~10 (z_phot=9.9+/-0.6) galaxy candidate stretched into an arc over ~2.5" by the effects of strong gravitational lensing. Discovered in the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS) Hubble Treasury program and companion S-RELICS Spitzer program, this candidate has a lensed H-band magnitude of 25.7+/-0.1 AB mag. With a magnification of \mu~4-7 estimated from our lens models, the de-lensed intrinsic magnitude is 27.6+/-0.3 AB mag, and the half-light radius is r_e<0.8 kpc, both consistent with other z>9 candidates. The inferred stellar mass (log [M* /M_Sun]=9.7^{+0.7}_{-0.5}) and star formation rate (\log [SFR/M_Sun yr^{-1}]=1.3^{+0.2}_{-0.3}) indicate that this candidate is a typical star-forming galaxy on the z>6 SFR-M* relation. We note that three independent lens models predict two counterimages, at least one of which should be of a similar magnitude to the arc, but these counterimages are not yet detected. Counterimages would not be expected if the arc were at lower redshift. However, the only spectral energy distributions capable of fitting the Hubble and Spitzer photometry well at lower redshifts require unphysical combinations of z~2 galaxy properties. The unprecedented lensed size of this z~10 candidate offers the potential for the James Webb Space Telescope to study the geometric and kinematic properties of a galaxy observed 500 Myr after the Big Bang.
  • Lyman alpha halos are observed ubiquitously around star-forming galaxies at high redshift, but their origin is still a matter of debate. We demonstrate that the emission from faint unresolved satellite sources, $M_{\rm UV} \gtrsim -17$, clustered around the central galaxies may play a major role in generating spatially extended Ly$\alpha$, continuum (${\rm UV + VIS}$) and H$\alpha$ halos. We apply the analytic formalism developed in Mas-Ribas & Dijkstra (2016) to model the halos around Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at $z=3.1$, for several different satellite clustering prescriptions. In general, our UV and Ly$\alpha$ surface brightness profiles match the observations well at $20\lesssim r \lesssim 40$ physical kpc from the centers of LAEs. We discuss how our profiles depend on various model assumptions and how these can be tested and constrained with future H$\alpha$ observations by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Our analysis shows how spatially extended halos constrain (i) the presence of otherwise undetectable satellite sources, (ii) the integrated, volumetric production rates of Ly$\alpha$ and LyC photons, and (iii) their population-averaged escape fractions. These quantities are all directly relevant for understanding galaxy formation and evolution and, for high enough redshifts, cosmic reionization.
  • Within one billion years of the Big Bang, intergalactic hydrogen was ionized by sources emitting ultraviolet and higher energy photons. This was the final phenomenon to globally affect all the baryons (visible matter) in the Universe. It is referred to as cosmic reionization and is an integral component of cosmology. It is broadly expected that intrinsically faint galaxies were the primary ionizing sources due to their abundance in this epoch. However, at the highest redshifts ($z>7.5$; lookback time 13.1 Gyr), all galaxies with spectroscopic confirmations to date are intrinsically bright and, therefore, not necessarily representative of the general population. Here, we report the unequivocal spectroscopic detection of a low luminosity galaxy at $z>7.5$. We detected the Lyman-$\alpha$ emission line at $\sim 10504$ {\AA} in two separate observations with MOSFIRE on the Keck I Telescope and independently with the Hubble Space Telescope's slit-less grism spectrograph, implying a source redshift of $z = 7.640 \pm 0.001$. The galaxy is gravitationally magnified by the massive galaxy cluster MACS J1423.8+2404 ($z = 0.545$), with an estimated intrinsic luminosity of $M_{AB} = -19.6 \pm 0.2$ mag and a stellar mass of $M_{\star} = 3.0^{+1.5}_{-0.8} \times 10^8$ solar masses. Both are an order of magnitude lower than the four other Lyman-$\alpha$ emitters currently known at $z > 7.5$, making it probably the most distant representative source of reionization found to date.
  • The CIII] and CIV rest-frame UV emission lines are powerful probes of the ionizations states of galaxies. They have furthermore been suggested as alternatives for spectroscopic redshift confirmation of objects at the epoch of reionization ($z>6$), where the most frequently used redshift indicator, Ly$\alpha$, is attenuated by the high fraction of neutral hydrogen in the inter-galactic medium. However, currently only very few confirmations of carbon UV lines at these high redshifts exist, making it challenging to quantify these claims. Here, we present the detection of CIV$\lambda\lambda$1548,1551\AA\ in \HST\ slitless grism spectroscopy obtained by GLASS of a Ly$\alpha$ emitter at $z=6.11$ multiply imaged by the massive foreground galaxy cluster RXJ2248. The CIV emission is detected at the 3--5$\sigma$ level in two images of the source, with marginal detection in two other images. We do not detect significant CIII]$\lambda\lambda$1907,1909\AA\ emission implying an equivalent width EW$_\textrm{CIII]}<20$\AA\ (1$\sigma$) and $\textrm{CIV/CIII}>0.7$ (2$\sigma$). Combined with limits on the rest-frame UV flux from the HeII$\lambda$1640\AA\ emission line and the OIII]$\lambda\lambda$1661,1666\AA\ doublet, we put constraints on the metallicity and the ionization state of the galaxy. The estimated line ratios and equivalent widths do not support a scenario where an AGN is responsible for ionizing the carbon atoms. SED fits including nebular emission lines imply a source with a mass of log(M/M$_\odot)\sim9$, SFR of around 10M$_\odot$/yr, and a young stellar population $<50$Myr old. The source shows a stronger ionizing radiation field than objects with detected CIV emission at $z<2$ and adds to the growing sample of low-mass (log(M/M$_\odot)\lesssim9$) galaxies at the epoch of reionization with strong radiation fields from star formation.
  • We present the first results of the KMOS Lens-Amplified Spectroscopic Survey (KLASS), a new ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) large program, doing multi-object integral field spectroscopy of galaxies gravitationally lensed behind seven galaxy clusters selected from the HST Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). Using the power of the cluster magnification we are able to reveal the kinematic structure of 25 galaxies at $0.7 \lesssim z \lesssim 2.3$, in four cluster fields, with stellar masses $8 \lesssim \log{(M_\star/M_\odot)} \lesssim 11$. This sample includes 5 sources at $z>1$ with lower stellar masses than in any previous kinematic IFU surveys. Our sample displays a diversity in kinematic structure over this mass and redshift range. The majority of our kinematically resolved sample is rotationally supported, but with a lower ratio of rotational velocity to velocity dispersion than in the local universe, indicating the fraction of dynamically hot disks changes with cosmic time. We find no galaxies with stellar mass $<3 \times 10^9 M_\odot$ in our sample display regular ordered rotation. Using the enhanced spatial resolution from lensing, we resolve a lower number of dispersion dominated systems compared to field surveys, competitive with findings from surveys using adaptive optics. We find that the KMOS IFUs recover emission line flux from HST grism-selected objects more faithfully than slit spectrographs. With artificial slits we estimate slit spectrographs miss on average 60% of the total flux of emission lines, which decreases rapidly if the emission line is spatially offset from the continuum.
  • The detection of intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) in Galactic globular clusters (GCs) has so far been controversial. In order to characterize the effectiveness of integrated-light spectroscopy through integral field units, we analyze realistic mock data generated from state-of-the-art Monte Carlo simulations of GCs with a central IMBH, considering different setups and conditions varying IMBH mass, cluster distance, and accuracy in determination of the center. The mock observations are modeled with isotropic Jeans models to assess the success rate in identifying the IMBH presence, which we find to be primarily dependent on IMBH mass. However, even for a IMBH of considerable mass (3% of the total GC mass), the analysis does not yield conclusive results in 1 out of 5 cases, because of shot noise due to bright stars close to the IMBH line-of-sight. This stochastic variability in the modeling outcome grows with decreasing BH mass, with approximately 3 failures out of 4 for IMBHs with 0.1% of total GC mass. Finally, we find that our analysis is generally unable to exclude at 68% confidence an IMBH with mass of $10^3~M_\odot$ in snapshots without a central BH. Interestingly, our results are not sensitive to GC distance within 5-20 kpc, nor to mis-identification of the GC center by less than 2'' (<20% of the core radius). These findings highlight the value of ground-based integral field spectroscopy for large GC surveys, where systematic failures can be accounted for, but stress the importance of discrete kinematic measurements that are less affected by stochasticity induced by bright stars.
  • Using Hubble data, including new grism spectra, Oesch et al. recently identified GN-z11, an $M_\textrm{UV}$=-21.1 galaxy at $z$=11.1 (just 400Myr after the big bang). With an estimated stellar mass of $\sim$10$^9$M$_{\odot}$, this galaxy is surprisingly bright and massive, raising questions as to how such an extreme object could form so early in the Universe. Using \Meraxes{}, a semi-analytic galaxy-formation model developed as part of the Dark-ages Reionization And Galaxy-formation Observables from Numerical Simulations (DRAGONS) programme, we investigate the potential formation mechanisms and eventual fate of GN-z11. The volume of our simulation is comparable to that of the discovery observations and possesses two analogue galaxies of similar luminosity to this remarkably bright system. Existing in the two most massive subhaloes at $z$=11.1 ($M_\textrm{vir}$=1.4$\times 10^{11}$M$_{\odot}$ and 6.7$\times 10^{10}$M$_{\odot}$), our model analogues show excellent agreement with all available observationally derived properties of GN-z11. Although they are relatively rare outliers from the full galaxy population at high-$z$, they are no longer the most massive or brightest systems by $z$=5. Furthermore, we find that both objects possess relatively smooth, but extremely rapid mass growth histories with consistently high star formation rates and UV luminosities at $z{>}11$, indicating that their brightness is not a transient, merger-driven feature. Our model results suggest that future wide-field surveys with the \textit{James Webb Space Telescope} may be able to detect the progenitors of GN-z11 analogues out to $z{\sim}$13--14, pushing the frontiers of galaxy-formation observations to the early phases of cosmic reionization and providing a valuable glimpse of the first galaxies to reionize the Universe on large scales.
  • (Abridged) We combine deep HST grism spectroscopy with a new Bayesian method to derive maps of gas-phase metallicity, nebular dust extinction, and star-formation rate for 10 star-forming galaxies at high redshift ($1.2<z<2.3$). Exploiting lensing magnification by the foreground cluster MACS1149.6+2223, we reach sub-kpc spatial resolution and push the stellar mass limit associated with such high-z spatially resolved measurements below $10^8M_\odot$ for the first time. Our maps exhibit diverse morphologies, indicative of various effects such as efficient radial mixing from tidal torques, rapid accretion of low-metallicity gas, etc., which can affect the gas and metallicity distributions in individual galaxies. Based upon an exhaustive sample of all existing sub-kpc metallicity gradients at high-z, we find that predictions given by analytical chemical evolution models assuming a relatively extended star-formation profile in the early disk formation phase can explain the majority of observed gradients, without involving galactic feedback or radial outflows. We observe a tentative correlation between stellar mass and metallicity gradient, consistent with the downsizing galaxy formation picture that more massive galaxies are more evolved into a later phase of disk growth, where they experience more coherent mass assembly at all radii and thus show shallower metallicity gradients. In addition, we compile a sample of homogeneously cross-calibrated integrated metallicity measurements spanning three orders of magnitude in stellar mass at $z\sim1.8$. We use this sample to study the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) and test the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR). The slope of the observed MZR can rule out the momentum-driven wind model at 3-$\sigma$ confidence level. We find no significant offset with respect to the FMR, taking into account the intrinsic scatter and measurement uncertainties.
  • We report the detection of Ly$\alpha$ emission at $\sim9538$\AA{} in the Keck/DEIMOS and \HST WFC3 G102 grism data from a triply-imaged galaxy at $z=6.846\pm0.001$ behind galaxy cluster MACS J2129.4$-$0741. Combining the emission line wavelength with broadband photometry, line ratio upper limits, and lens modeling, we rule out the scenario that this emission line is \oii at $z=1.57$. After accounting for magnification, we calculate the weighted average of the intrinsic Ly$\alpha$ luminosity to be $\sim1.3\times10^{42}~\mathrm{erg}~\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ and Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width to be $74\pm15$\AA{}. Its intrinsic UV absolute magnitude at 1600\AA{} is $-18.6\pm0.2$ mag and stellar mass $(1.5\pm0.3)\times10^{7}~M_{\odot}$, making it one of the faintest (intrinsic $L_{UV}\sim0.14~L_{UV}^*$) galaxies with Ly$\alpha$ detection at $z\sim7$ to date. Its stellar mass is in the typical range for the galaxies thought to dominate the reionization photon budget at $z\gtrsim7$; the inferred Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction is high ($\gtrsim 10$\%), which could be common for sub-$L^*$ $z\gtrsim7$ galaxies with Ly$\alpha$ emission. This galaxy offers a glimpse of the galaxy population that is thought to drive reionization, and it shows that gravitational lensing is an important avenue to probe the sub-$L^*$ galaxy population.
  • We present a strong and weak gravitational lens model of the galaxy cluster MACSJ0416.1-2403, constrained using spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) and Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging data. We search for emission lines in known multiply imaged sources in the GLASS spectra, obtaining secure spectroscopic redshifts of 31 multiple images belonging to 16 distinct source galaxies. The GLASS spectra provide the first spectroscopic measurements for 6 of the source galaxies. The weak lensing signal is acquired from 884 galaxies in the F606W HFF image. By combining the weak lensing constraints with 15 multiple image systems with spectroscopic redshifts and 9 multiple image systems with photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster on an adaptive grid. The resulting total mass density map is compared with a stellar mass density map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields imaging data to study the relative distribution of stellar and total mass in the cluster. We find that the projected stellar mass to total mass ratio, $f_{\star}$, varies considerably with the stellar surface mass density. The mean projected stellar mass to total mass ratio is $\langle f_{\star} \rangle= 0.009 \pm 0.003 $ (stat.), but with a systematic error as large as $0.004-0.005$, dominated by the choice of the IMF. We find agreement with several recent measurements of $f_{\star}$ in massive cluster environments. The lensing maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available to the broader community in the standard HFF format.
  • When embedded in dense cluster cores, intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) acquire close stellar or stellar-remnant companions. These companions are not only gravitationally bound, they tend to hierarchically isolate from other cluster stars through series of multibody encounters. In this paper, we study the demographics of IMBH companions in compact star clusters through direct $N$-body simulation. We study clusters initially composed of $10^5$ or $2\times 10^5$ stars with IMBHs of 75 and 150 solar masses, and follow their evolution for 6-10 Gyr. A tight innermost binary pair of IMBH and stellar object rapidly forms. The IMBH has a companion with orbital semi-major axis at least three times tighter than the second-most bound object over 90% of the time. These companionships have typical periods of order years and are subject to cycles of exchange and destruction. The most frequently observed, long-lived pairings persist for $\sim 10^7$ yr. The demographics of IMBH companions in clusters are diverse; they include both main sequence, giant stars, and stellar remnants. Companion objects may reveal the presence of an IMBH in a cluster in one of several ways. Most-bound companion stars routinely suffer grazing tidal interactions with the IMBH, offering a dynamical mechanism to produce repeated flaring episodes like those seen in the IMBH candidate HLX-1. Stellar winds of companion stars provide a minimum quiescent accretion rate for IMBHs, with implications for radio searches for IMBH accretion in globular clusters. Finally, gravitational wave inspirals of compact objects are found to occur with promising frequency.
  • We present a model for the evolution of the galaxy ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function (LF) across cosmic time where star formation is linked to the assembly of dark matter halos under the assumption of a mass dependent, but redshift independent, efficiency. We introduce a new self-consistent treatment of the halo star formation history, which allows us to make predictions at $z>10$ (lookback time $\lesssim500$ Myr), when growth is rapid. With a calibration at a single redshift to set the stellar-to-halo mass ratio, and no further degrees of freedom, our model captures the evolution of the UV LF over all available observations ($0\lesssim z\lesssim10$). The significant drop in luminosity density of currently detectable galaxies beyond $z\sim8$ is explained by a shift of star formation toward less massive, fainter galaxies. Assuming that star formation proceeds down to atomic cooling halos, we derive a reionization optical depth $\tau = 0.056^{+0.007}_{-0.010}$, fully consistent with the latest Planck measurement, implying that the universe is fully reionized at $z=7.84^{+0.65}_{-0.98}$. In addition, our model naturally produces smoothly rising star formation histories for galaxies with $L\lesssim L_*$ in agreement with observations and hydrodynamical simulations. Before the epoch of reionization at $z>10$ we predict the LF to remain well-described by a Schechter function, but with an increasingly steep faint-end slope ($\alpha\sim-3.5$ at $z\sim16$). Finally, we construct forecasts for surveys with \JWST~and \WFIRST and predict that galaxies out to $z\sim14$ will be observed. Galaxies at $z>15$ will likely be accessible to JWST and WFIRST only through the assistance of strong lensing magnification.
  • We present the first study of the spatial distribution of star formation in z~0.5 cluster galaxies. The analysis is based on data taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 as part of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). We illustrate the methodology by focusing on two clusters (MACS0717.5+3745 and MACS1423.8+2404) with different morphologies (one relaxed and one merging) and use foreground and background galaxies as field control sample. The cluster+field sample consists of 42 galaxies with stellar masses in the range 10^8-10^11 M_sun, and star formation rates in the range 1-20 M_sun/yr. Both in clusters and in the field, H{\alpha} is more extended than the rest-frame UV continuum in 60% of the cases, consistent with diffuse star formation and inside out growth. In ~20% of the cases, the H{\alpha} emission appears more extended in cluster galaxies than in the field, pointing perhaps to ionized gas being stripped and/or star formation being enhanced at large radii. The peak of the H{\alpha} emission and that of the continuum are offset by less than 1 kpc. We investigate trends with the hot gas density as traced by the X-ray emission, and with the surface mass density as inferred from gravitational lens models and find no conclusive results. The diversity of morphologies and sizes observed in H_alpha illustrates the complexity of the environmental process that regulate star formation. Upcoming analysis of the full GLASS dataset will increase our sample size by almost an order of magnitude, verifying and strengthening the inference from this initial dataset.
  • We present the first uniform treatment of long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy detections and upper limits over the redshift range 3<z<5, a key epoch for observational and theoretical efforts to understand the processes, environments, and consequences of early cosmic star formation. We contribute deep imaging observations of 13 GRB positions yielding the discovery of eight new host galaxies. We use this dataset in tandem with previously published observations of 31 further GRB positions to estimate or constrain the host galaxy rest-frame ultraviolet (UV; 1600 A) absolute magnitudes M_UV. We then use the combined set of 44 M_UV estimates and limits to construct the M_UV luminosity function (LF) for GRB host galaxies over 3<z<5 and compare it to expectations from Lyman break galaxy (LBG) photometric surveys with the Hubble Space Telescope. Adopting standard prescriptions for the luminosity dependence of galaxy dust obscuration (and hence, total star formation rate), we find that our LF is compatible with LBG observations over a factor of 600x in host luminosity, from M_UV = -22.5 mag to >-15.6 mag, and with extrapolations of the assumed Schechter-type LF well beyond this range. We review proposed astrophysical and observational biases for our sample, and find they are for the most part minimal. We therefore conclude, as the simplest interpretation of our results, that GRBs successfully trace UV metrics of cosmic star formation over the range 3<z<5. Our findings suggest GRBs are providing an accurate picture of star formation processes from z ~3 out to the highest redshifts.
  • Investigations of elemental abundances in the ancient and most metal deficient stars are extremely important because they serve as tests of variable nucleosynthesis pathways and can provide critical inferences of the type of stars that lived and died before them. The presence of r-process elements in a handful of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP-r) stars, which are assumed to be closely connected to the chemical yield from the first stars, is hard to reconcile with standard neutron star mergers. Here we show that the production rate of dynamically assembled compact binaries in high-z nuclear star clusters can attain a sufficient high value to be a potential viable source of heavy r-process material in CEMP-r stars. The predicted frequency of such events in the early Galaxy, much lower than the frequency of Type II supernovae but with significantly higher mass ejected per event, can naturally lead to a high level of scatter of Eu as observed in CEMP-r stars.
  • We present a Bayesian framework to account for the magnification bias from both strong and weak gravitational lensing in estimates of high-redshift galaxy luminosity functions. We illustrate our method by estimating the $z\sim8$ UV luminosity function using a sample of 97 Y-band dropouts (Lyman break galaxies) found in the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey and from the literature. We find the luminosity function is well described by a Schechter function with characteristic magnitude of $M^\star = -19.85^{+0.30}_{-0.35}$, faint-end slope of $\alpha = -1.72^{+0.30}_{-0.29}$, and number density of $\log_{10} \Psi^\star [\textrm{Mpc}^{-3}] = -3.00^{+0.23}_{-0.31}$. These parameters are consistent within the uncertainties with those inferred from the same sample without accounting for the magnification bias, demonstrating that the effect is small for current surveys at $z\sim8$, and cannot account for the apparent overdensity of bright galaxies compared to a Schechter function found recently by Bowler et al. (2014a,b) and Finkelstein et al. (2014). We estimate that the probability of finding a strongly lensed $z\sim8$ source in our sample is in the range $\sim 3-15 \%$ depending on limiting magnitude. We identify one strongly-lensed candidate and three cases of intermediate lensing in BoRG (estimated magnification $\mu>1.4$) in addition to the previously known candidate group-scale strong lens. Using a range of theoretical luminosity functions we conclude that magnification bias will dominate wide field surveys -- such as those planned for the Euclid and WFIRST missions -- especially at $z>10$. Magnification bias will need to be accounted for in order to derive accurate estimates of high-redshift luminosity functions in these surveys and to distinguish between galaxy formation models.