• It was recently proposed that the globular cluster system of the very low surface-brightness galaxy NGC1052-DF2 is dynamically very cold, leading to the conclusion that this dwarf galaxy has little or no dark matter. Here, we show that a robust statistical measure of the velocity dispersion of the tracer globular clusters implies a mundane velocity dispersion and a poorly constrained mass-to-light ratio. Models that include the possibility that some of the tracers are field contaminants do not yield a more constraining inference. We derive only a weak constraint on the mass-to-light ratio of the system within the half-light radius or within the radius of the furthest tracer (M/L_V<8.1 at the 90-percent confidence level). Typical mass-to-light ratios measured for dwarf galaxies of the same stellar mass as NGC1052-DF2 are well within this limit. With this study, we emphasize the need to properly account for measurement uncertainties and to stay as close as possible to the data when determining dynamical masses from very small data sets of tracers.
  • We present homogeneous, sub-horizontal branch photometry of twenty dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of M31 observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. Combining our new data for sixteen systems with archival data in the same filters for another four, we show that Andromeda dwarf spheroidal galaxies favor strikingly red horizontal branches or red clumps down to ~10^{4.2} Lsun (M_V ~ -5.8). The age-sensitivity of horizontal branch stars implies that a large fraction of the M31 dwarf galaxies have extended star formation histories (SFHs), and appear inconsistent with early star formation episodes that were rapidly shutdown. Systems fainter than ~10^{5.5} Lsun show the widest range in the ratios and morphologies of red and blue horizontal branches, indicative of both complex SFHs and a diversity in quenching timescales and/or mechanisms, which is qualitatively different from what is currently known for faint Milky Way (MW) satellites of comparable luminosities. Our findings bolster similar conclusions from recent deeper data for a handful of M31 dwarf galaxies. We discuss several sources for diversity of our data such as varying halo masses, patchy reionization, mergers/accretion, and the environmental influence of M31 and the Milky Way on the early evolution of their satellite populations. A detailed comparison between the histories of M31 and MW satellites would shed signifiant insight into the processes that drive the evolution of low-mass galaxies. Such a study will require imaging that reaches the oldest main sequence turnoffs for a significant number of M31 companions.
  • We present a chemodynamical analysis of the Leo~V dwarf galaxy, based on Keck II DEIMOS spectra of 8 member stars. We find a systemic velocity for the system of $\langle v_r\rangle = 170.9^{+ 2.1}_{-1.9}$kms$^{-1}$, and barely resolve a velocity dispersion for the system, with $\sigma_{vr} = 2.3^{+3.2}_{-1.6}$kms$^{-1}$, consistent with previous studies of Leo~V. The poorly resolved dispersion means we are unable to adequately constrain the dark matter content of Leo~V. We find an average metallicity for the dwarf of [Fe/H]$ = -2.48\pm0.21$, and measure a significant spread in the iron abundance of its member stars, with $-3.1\le$[Fe/H]$\le-1.9$ dex, which cleanly identifies Leo~V as a dwarf galaxy that has been able to self-enrich its stellar population through extended star formation. Owing to the tentative photometric evidence for tidal substructure around Leo~V, we also investigate whether there is any evidence for tidal stripping or shocking of the system within its dynamics. We measure a significant velocity gradient across the system, of $\frac{{\rm d}v}{{\rm d}\chi} = -4.1^{+2.8}_{-2.6}$kms$^{-1}$ per arcmin (or $\frac{{\rm d}v}{{\rm d}\chi} = -71.9^{+50.8}_{-45.6}$kms$^{-1}$~kpc$^{-1}$), which points almost directly toward the Galactic centre. We argue that Leo~V is likely a dwarf on the brink of dissolution, having just barely survived a past encounter with the centre of the Milky Way.
  • In the last decade, several ultra faint objects (UFOs, $M_V\gtrsim-3.5$) have been discovered in the outer halo of the Milky Way. For some of these objects it is not clear whether they are star clusters or (ultra-faint) dwarf galaxies. In this work we quantify the contribution of star clusters to the population of UFOs. We extrapolated the mass and Galactocentric radius distribution of the globular clusters using a population model, finding that the Milky Way contains about $3.3^{+7.3}_{-1.6}$ star clusters with $M_V\gtrsim-3.5$ and Galactocentric radius $\geq20\,$kpc. To understand whether dissolving clusters can appear as UFOs, we run a suite of direct $N$-body models, varying the orbit, the Galactic potential, the binary fraction and the black hole (BH) natal kick velocities. In the analyses, we consider observational biases such as: luminosity limit, field stars, and line-of-sight projection. We find that star clusters contribute to both the compact and the extended population of UFOs: clusters without BHs appear compact with radii $\sim5\,$pc, while clusters that retain their BHs after formation have radii $\gtrsim20\,$pc. The properties of the extended clusters are remarkably similar to those of dwarf galaxies: high inferred mass-to-light ratios due to binaries; binary properties mildly affected by dynamical evolution; no observable mass segregation; and flattened stellar mass function. We conclude that the slope of the stellar mass function as a function of Galactocentric radius and the presence/absence of cold streams can discriminate between DM free and DM dominated UFOs.
  • As part of the Z-PAndAS Keck II DEIMOS survey of resolved stars in our neighboring galaxy, Andromeda (M31), we have built up a unique data set of measured velocities and chemistries for thousands of stars in the Andromeda stellar halo, particularly probing its rich and complex substructure. In this contribution, we will discuss the structural, dynamical and chemical properties of Andromeda's dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and how there is no observational evidence for a difference in the evolutionary histories of those found on and off M31's vast plane of satellites. We will also discuss a possible extension to the most significant merger event in M31 - the Giant Southern Stream - and how we can use this feature to refine our understanding of M31's mass profile, and its complex evolution.
  • We present a study of the recently discovered compact stellar system Triangulum II. From observations conducted with the DEIMOS spectrograph on Keck II, we obtained spectra for 13 member stars that follow the CMD features of this very faint stellar system and include two bright red giant branch stars. Tri II has a very negative radial velocity (<v_r>=-383.7^{+3.0}_{-3.3} km/s) that translates to <v_{r,gsr}> ~ -264 km/s and confirms it is a Milky Way satellite. We show that, despite the small data set, there is evidence that Tri II has complex internal kinematics. Its radial velocity dispersion increases from 4.4^{+2.8}_{-2.0} km/s in the central 2' to 14.1^{+5.8}_{-4.2} km/s outwards. The velocity dispersion of the full sample is inferred to be \sigma_{vr}=9.9^{+3.2}_{-2.2} km/s. From the two bright RGB member stars we measure an average metallicity <[Fe/H]>=-2.6+/-0.2, placing Tri II among the most metal-poor Milky Way dwarf galaxies. In addition, the spectra of the fainter member stars exhibit differences in their line widths that could be the indication of a metallicity dispersion in the system. All these properties paint a complex picture for Tri II, whose nature and current state are largely speculative. The inferred metallicity properties of the system however lead us to favor a scenario in which Tri II is a dwarf galaxy that is either disrupting or embedded in a stellar stream.
  • We present the first spectroscopic analysis of the faint and compact stellar system Draco II (Dra II, M_V=-2.9+/-0.8, r_h=19^{+8}_{-6} pc), recently discovered in the Pan-STARRS1 3{\pi} survey. The observations, conducted with DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope, establish some of its basic characteristics: the velocity data reveal a narrow peak with 9 member stars at a systemic heliocentric velocity <v_r>=-347.6^{+1.7}_{-1.8} km/s, thereby confirming Dra II is a satellite of the Milky Way; we infer a velocity dispersion with \sigma_{vr}=2.9+/-2.1 km/s (<8.4 km/s at the 95% confidence level), which implies log_{10}(M_{1/2})=5.5^{+0.4}_{-0.6} and log_{10}((M/L)_{1/2})=2.7^{+0.5}_{-0.8}, in Solar units; furthermore, very weak Calcium triplet lines in the spectra of the high signal-to-noise member stars imply [Fe/H]<-2.1, whilst variations in the line strengths of two stars with similar colours and magnitudes suggest a metallicity spread in Dra II. These new data cannot clearly discriminate whether Draco II is a star cluster or amongst the faintest, most compact, and closest dwarf galaxies. However, the sum of the three --- individually inconclusive --- pieces of evidence presented here, seems to favour the dwarf galaxy interpretation.
  • The thin, extended planes of satellite galaxies detected around both the Milky Way and Andromeda are not a natural prediction of the LCDM paradigm. Galaxies in these distinct planes may have formed and evolved in a different way (e.g., tidally) to their off-plane neighbours. If this were the case, one would expect the on- and off-plane dwarf galaxies in Andromeda to have experienced different evolutionary histories, which should be reflected by the chemistries, dynamics, and star formation histories of the two populations. In this work, we present new, robust kinematic observations for 2 on-plane M31 dSphs (And XVI and XVII) and compile and compare all available observational metrics for the on- and off-plane dwarfs to search for a signal that would corroborate such a hypothesis. We find that, barring their spatial alignment, the on- and off-plane Andromeda dwarf galaxies are indistinguishable from one another, arguing against vastly different formative and evolutionary histories for these two populations.
  • We present Keck II/DEIMOS spectroscopy of the three distant dwarf galaxies of M31 Lacerta I, Cassiopeia III, and Perseus I, recently discovered within the Pan-STARRS1 3\pi imaging survey. The systemic velocities of the three systems (v_{r,helio} = -198.4 +/- 1.1 km/s, -371.6 +/- 0.7 km/s, and -326 +/- 3 km/s, respectively) confirm that they are satellites of M31. In the case of Lacerta I and Cassiopeia III, the high quality of the data obtained for 126 and 212 member stars, respectively, yields reliable constraints on their global velocity dispersions (\sigma_{vr} = 10.3 +/- 0.9 km/s and 8.4 +/- 0.6 km/s, respectively), leading to dynamical-mass estimates for both of ~4x10^7 Msun within their half-light radius. These translate to V-band mass-to-light ratios of 15^{+12}_{-9} and 8^{+9}_{-5} in solar units. We also use our spectroscopic data to determine the average metallicity of the 3 dwarf galaxies ([Fe/H] = -2.0 +/- 0.1, -1.7 +/- 0.1, and -2.0 +/- 0.2, respectively). All these properties are typical of dwarf galaxy satellites of Andromeda with their luminosity and size.
  • We reveal the highly structured nature of the Milky Way stellar halo within the footprint of the PAndAS photometric survey from blue main sequence and main sequence turn-off stars. We map no fewer than five stellar structures within a heliocentric range of ~5 to 30 kpc. Some of these are known (the Monoceros Ring, the Pisces/Triangulum globular cluster stream), but we also uncover three well-defined stellar structures that could be, at least partly, responsible for the so-called Triangulum/Andromeda and Triangulum/Andromeda 2 features. In particular, we trace a new faint stellar stream located at a heliocentric distance of ~17 kpc. With a surface brightness of \Sigma_V ~ 32-32.5 mag/arcsec^2, it follows an orbit that is almost parallel to the Galactic plane north of M31 and has so far eluded surveys of the Milky Way halo as these tend to steer away from regions dominated by the Galactic disk. Investigating our follow-up spectroscopic observations of PAndAS, we serendipitously uncover a radial velocity signature from stars that have colors and magnitudes compatible with the stream. From the velocity of eight likely member stars, we show that this stellar structure is dynamically cold, with an unresolved velocity dispersion that is lower than 7.1 km/s at the 90-percent confidence level. Along with the width of the stream (300-650 pc), its dynamics points to a dwarf-galaxy-accretion origin. The numerous stellar structures we can map in the Milky Way stellar halo between 5 and 30 kpc and their varying morphology is a testament to the complex nature of the stellar halo at these intermediate distances.
  • We investigate the claim that all dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) reside within halos that share a common, universal mass profile as has been derived for dSphs of the Galaxy. By folding in kinematic information for 25 Andromeda dSphs, more than doubling the previous sample size, we find that a singular mass profile can not be found to fit all the observations well. Further, the best-fit dark matter density profile measured for solely the Milky Way dSphs is marginally discrepant (at just beyond the 1 sigma level) with that of the Andromeda dSphs, where a profile with lower maximum circular velocity, and hence mass, is preferred. The agreement is significantly better when three extreme Andromeda outliers, And XIX, XXI and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (>600pc) and low velocity dispersions (sigma_v < 5km/s) are omitted from the sample. We argue that the unusual properties of these outliers are likely caused by tidal interactions with the host galaxy.
  • We present a homogeneous kinematic analysis of red giant branch stars within 18 of the 28 Andromeda dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, obtained using the Keck I LRIS and Keck II DEIMOS spectrographs. Based on their g-i colors (taken with the CFHT MegaCam imager), physical positions on the sky, and radial velocities, we assign probabilities of dSph membership to each observed star. Using this information, the velocity dispersions, central masses and central densities of the dark matter halos are calculated for these objects, and compared with the properties of the Milky Way dSph population. We also measure the average metallicity ([Fe/H]) from the co-added spectra of member stars for each M31 dSph and find that they are consistent with the trend of decreasing [Fe/H] with luminosity observed in the Milky Way population. We find that three of our studied M31 dSphs appear as significant outliers in terms of their central velocity dispersion, And XIX, XXI and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (>700 pc) and low velocity dispersions (sigma_v<5 km/s). In addition, And XXV has a mass-to-light ratio within its half-light radius of just [M/L]_{half}=10.3^{+7.0}_{-6.7}, making it consistent with a simple stellar system with no appreciable dark matter component within its 1 sigma uncertainties. We suggest that the structure of the dark matter halos of these outliers have been significantly altered by tides.
  • We report on the discovery of strong tidal features around a dwarf spheroidal galaxy in the Hydra I galaxy cluster, indicating its ongoing tidal disruption. This very low surface brightness object, HCC-087, was originally classified as an early-type dwarf in the Hydra Cluster Catalogue (HCC), but our re-analysis of the ESO-VLT/FORS images of the HCC unearthed a clear indication of an S-shaped morphology and a large spatial extent. Its shape, luminosity (M_V=-11.6 mag), and physical size (at a half-light radius of 3.1 kpc and a full length of ~5.9 kpc) are comparable to the recently discovered NGC 4449B and the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal, all of which are undergoing clear tidal disruption. Aided by N-body simulations we argue that HCC-087 is currently at its first apocenter, at 150 kpc, around the cluster center and that it is being tidally disrupted by the galaxy cluster's potential itself. An interaction with the near-by (50 kpc) S0 cluster galaxy HCC-005, at M* ~ 3 x 10^10 M_sun is rather unlikely, as this constellation requires a significant amount of dynamical friction and thus low relative velocities. The S-shaped morphology and large spatial extent of the satellite would, however, also appear if HCC-087 would orbit the cluster center. These features appear to be characteristic properties of satellites that are seen in the process of being tidally disrupted, independent of the environment of the destruction. An important finding of our simulations is an orientation of the tidal tails perpendicular to the orbit.
  • Using spectroscopic data taken with Keck II DEIMOS by the Z-PAndAS team in the Andromeda-Triangulum region, I present a comparison of the disc and satellite systems of Andromeda with those of our own Galaxy. I discuss the observed discrepancies between the masses and scale radii of Andromeda dwarf spheroidal galaxies of a given luminosity with those of the Milky Way. I also also present an analysis of the newly discovered M31 thick disc, which is measured to be hotter, more extended and thicker than that seen in the Milky Way.
  • In hierarchical cosmological models, galaxies grow in mass through the continual accretion of smaller ones. The tidal disruption of these systems is expected to result in loosely bound stars surrounding the galaxy, at distances that reach $10 - 100$ times the radius of the central disk. The number, luminosity and morphology of the relics of this process provide significant clues to galaxy formation history, but obtaining a comprehensive survey of these components is difficult because of their intrinsic faintness and vast extent. Here we report a panoramic survey of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). We detect stars and coherent structures that are almost certainly remnants of dwarf galaxies destroyed by the tidal field of M31. An improved census of their surviving counterparts implies that three-quarters of M31's satellites brighter than $M_V < -6$ await discovery. The brightest companion, Triangulum (M33), is surrounded by a stellar structure that provides persuasive evidence for a recent encounter with M31. This panorama of galaxy structure directly confirms the basic tenets of the hierarchical galaxy formation model and reveals the shared history of M31 and M33 in the unceasing build-up of galaxies.