• The multipole concept, which characterizes the spacial distribution of scalar and vector objects by their angular dependence, has already become widely used in various areas of physics. In recent years it has become employed to systematically classify the anisotropic distribution of electrons and magnetization around atoms in solid state materials. This has been fuelled by the discovery of several physical phenomena that exhibit unusual higher rank multipole moments, beyond that of the conventional degrees of freedom as charge and magnetic dipole moment. Moreover, the higher rank electric/magnetic multipole moments have been suggested as promising order parameters in exotic hidden order phases. While the experimental investigations of such anomalous phases have provided encouraging observations of multipolar order, theoretical approaches have developed at a slower pace. In particular, a materials' specific theory has been missing. The multipole concept has furthermore been recognized as the key quantity which characterizes the resultant configuration of magnetic moments in a cluster of atomic moments. This cluster multipole moment has then been introduced as macroscopic order parameter for a noncollinear antiferromagnetic structure in crystals that can explain unusual physical phenomena whose appearance is determined by the magnetic point group symmetry. It is the purpose of this review to discuss the recent developments in the first-principles theory investigating multipolar degrees of freedom in condensed matter systems. These recent developments exemplify that ab initio electronic structure calculations can unveil detailed insight in the mechanism of physical phenomena caused by the unconventional, multipole degree of freedom.
  • Temperature gradient in a ferromagnetic conductor may generate a spontaneous transverse voltage drop in the direction perpendicular to both magnetization and heat current. This anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) has been considered to be proportional to the magnetization, and thus observed only in ferromagnets, while recent theories indicate that ANE provides a measure of the Berry curvature at the Fermi energy $E_{\rm F}$. Here we report the observation of a large ANE at zero field in the chiral antiferromagnet Mn$_3$Sn. Despite a very small magnetization $\sim 0.002$ $\mu_{\rm B}/$Mn, the transverse Seebeck coefficient at zero field is $\sim 0.35~\mu$V/K at room temperature and reaches $\sim 0.6~\mu$V/K at 200 K, comparable with the maximum value known for a ferromagnetic metal. Our first-principles calculation reveals that the large ANE comes from a significantly enhanced Berry curvature associated with the Weyl points nearby $E_{\rm F}$. The ANE is geometrically convenient for the thermoelectric power generation, as it enables a lateral configuration of the modules to efficiently cover the heat source. Our observation of the large ANE in an antiferromagnet paves a way to develop a new class of thermoelectric material using topological magnets to fabricate an efficient, densely integrated thermopile.
  • The large quantum oscillations observed in the thermoelectric power in the antiferromagnetic (AF) state of the heavy-fermion compound CeRh2Si2 disappear suddenly when entering in the polarized paramagnetic (PPM) state at Hc=26.5 T, indicating an abrupt reconstruction of the Fermi surface. The electronic band structure was [LDA+U] for the AF state taking the correct magnetic structure into account, for the PPM state, and for the paramagnetic state (PM). Different Fermi surfaces were obtained for the AF, PM, and PPM states. Due to band folding, a large number of branches was expected and observed in the AF state. The LDA+U calculation was compared with the previous LDA calculations. Furthermore, we compared both calculations with previously published de Haas-van Alphen experiments. The better agreement with the LDA approach suggests that above the critical pressure pc CeRh2Si2 enters in a mixed-valence state. In the PPM state under a high magnetic field, the 4f contribution at the Fermi level EF drops significantly compared with that in the PM state, and the 4f electrons contribute only weakly to the Fermi surface in our approach.
  • We introduce a cluster extension of multipole moments to discuss the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in both ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) states in a unified framework. We first derive general symmetry requirements for the AHE in the presence or absence of the spin-orbit coupling, by considering the symmetry of the Berry curvature in k space. The cluster multipole (CMP) moments are then defined to quantify the macroscopic magnetization in non-collinear AFM states, as a natural generalization of the magnetization in FM states. We identify the macroscopic CMP order which induces the AHE. The theoretical framework is applied to the non-collinear AFM states of Mn3Ir, for which an AHE was predicted in a first-principles calculation, and Mn3Z (Z=Sn, Ge), for which a large AHE was recently discovered experimentally. We further compare the AHE in Mn3Z and bcc Fe in terms of the CMP. We show that the AHE in Mn3Z is characterized with the magnetization of a cluster octupole moment in the same manner as that in bcc Fe characterized with the magnetization of the dipole moment.
  • In a type I Dirac or Weyl semimetal, the low energy states are squeezed to a single point in momentum space when the chemical potential Ef is tuned precisely to the Dirac/Weyl point. Recently, a type II Weyl semimetal was predicted to exist, where the Weyl states connect hole and electron bands, separated by an indirect gap. This leads to unusual energy states, where hole and electron pockets touch at the Weyl point. Here we present the discovery of a type II topological Weyl semimetal (TWS) state in pure MoTe2, where two sets of WPs (W2+-, W3+-) exist at the touching points of electron and hole pockets and are located at different binding energies above Ef. Using ARPES, modeling, DFT and calculations of Berry curvature, we identify the Weyl points and demonstrate that they are connected by different sets of Fermi arcs for each of the two surface terminations. We also find new surface "track states" that form closed loops and are unique to type II Weyl semimetals. This material provides an exciting, new platform to study the properties of Weyl fermions.
  • Motivated by the recent discovery of superconductivity in the iron-based ladder compound BaFe$_2$S$_3$ under high pressure, we derive low-energy effective Hamiltonians from first principles. We show that the complex band structure around the Fermi level is represented only by the Fe 3$d_{xz}$ (mixed with 3$d_{xy}$) and 3$d_{x^2-y^2}$ orbitals. The characteristic band degeneracy allows us to construct a four-band model with the band unfolding approach. We also estimate the interaction parameters and show that the system is more correlated than the 1111 family of iron-based superconductors. Provided the superconductivity is mediated by spin fluctuations, the $3d_{xz}$-like band plays an essential role, and the gap function changes its sign between the Fermi surface around the $\Gamma$ point and that around the Brillouin-zone boundary.
  • We study the magnetic, structural, and electronic properties of the recently discovered iron- based superconductor BaFe2S3 based on density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. The calculations show that the magnetic alignment in which the spins are coupled ferromagnetically along the rung and antiferromagnetically along the leg is the most stable in the possible magnetic structure within an Fe-ladder and is further stabilized with the periodicity char- acterized by the wave vector Q=(pi,pi,0), leading to the experimentally observed magnetic ground state. The magnetic exchange interaction between the Fe-ladders creates a tiny energy gap, whose size is in excellent agreement with the experiments. Applied pressure suppresses the energy gap and leads to an insulator-metal transition. Finally, we also discuss what type of orbitals can play crucial roles on the magnetic and insulator-metal transition.
  • Heavy-fermion superconductors are prime candidates for novel electron-pairing states due to the spin-orbital coupled degrees of freedom and electron correlations. Superconductivity in CeCu$_2$Si$_2$ discovered in 1979, which is a prototype of unconventional (non-BCS) superconductors in strongly correlated electron systems, still remains unsolved. Here we provide the first report of superconductivity based on the advanced first-principles theoretical approach. We find that the promising candidate is an $s_\pm$-wave state with loop-shaped nodes on the Fermi surface, different from the widely expected line-nodal $d$-wave state. The dominant pairing glue is magnetic but high-rank octupolar fluctuations. This system shares the importance of multi-orbital degrees of freedom with the iron-based superconductors. Our findings reveal not only the long-standing puzzle in this material, but also urge us to reconsider the pairing states and mechanisms in all heavy-fermion superconductors.
  • We have observed Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in FeSe. The Fermi surface deviates significantly from predictions of band-structure calculations and most likely consists of one electron and one hole thin cylinder. The carrier density is in the order of 0.01 carriers/ Fe, an order-of-magnitude smaller than predicted. Effective Fermi energies as small as 3.6 meV are estimated. These findings call for elaborate theoretical investigations incorporating both electronic correlations and orbital ordering.
  • On the basis of group theory and the first-principles calculations, we investigate high-rank multipole orderings in URu2Si2, which have been proposed as a genuine primary order parameter in the hidden order phase below 17.5K. We apply Shubnikov group theory to the multipole ordered states characterized by the wave vector Q = (0, 0, 1) and specify the global/site symmetry and the secondary order parameters, such as induced dipole moments and change in charge distribution. We find that such antiferroic magnetic multipole orderings have particularly advantageous to conceal the primary order parameter due to preserving high symmetry in charge distribution. Experimental observations of the inherent low-rank multipoles, which are explicitly classified in this paper, will be key pieces to understand the puzzling hidden order phase.
  • The electronic ground states of the actinide dioxides AnO2 (with An=U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm) are investigated employing first-principles calculations within the framework of the local density approximation +U (LDA+U) approach, implemented in a full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave scheme. A systematic analysis of the An-5f states is performed which provides intuitive connections between the electronic structures and the local crystalline fields of the f states in the AnO2 series. Particularly the mechanisms leading to the experimentally observed insulating ground states are investigated. These are found to be caused by the strong spin-orbit and Coulomb interactions of the 5f orbitals; however, as a result of the different configurations, this mechanism works in distinctly different ways for each of the AnO2 compounds. In agreement with experimental observations, the nonmagnetic states of plutonium and curium dioxide are computed to be insulating, whereas those of uranium, neptunium, and americium dioxides require additional symmetry breaking to reproduce the insulator ground states, a condition which is met with magnetic phase transitions. We show that the occupancy of the An-f orbitals is closely connected to each of the appearing insulating mechanisms. We furthermore investigate the detailed constitution of the noncollinear multipolar moments for transverse 3q magnetic ordered states in UO2 and longitudinal 3q high-rank multipolar ordered states in NpO2 and AmO2.
  • We provide a first-principle, materials-specific theory of multipolar order and superexchange in NpO$_2$ by means of a non-collinear local-density approximation +$U$ (LDA+$U$) method. Our calculations offer a precise microscopic description of the triple-$q$-antiferro ordered phase in the absence of any dipolar moment. We find that, while the most common non-dipolar degrees of freedom (e.g., electric quadrupoles and magnetic octupoles) are active in the ordered phase, both the usually neglected higher-order multipoles (electric hexadecapoles and magnetic triakontadipoles) have at least an equally significant effect.