• We propose an optimized design for nanowire superconducting single photon detectors, using the recently discovered position dependent detection efficiency in these devices. This knowledge allows an optimized the design of meandering wire NbN detectors by altering the field distribution across the wire. In order to calculate the response of the detectors with different geometries, we use a monotonic local detection efficiency from a nanowire and optical absorption distribution via finite-different-time-domain simulations. The calculations predict a trade-off between average absorption and the edge effect leading to a predicted optimal wire width close to 100 nm for 1550 nm wavelength, which drops to 50 nm wire width for 600 nm wavelength. The absorption at the edges can be enhanced by depositing a silicon nanowire on top of the superconducting nanowire, which improves both the total absorption efficiency as well as the internal detection efficiency of meandering wire structures.
  • Using detector tomography, we investigate the detection mechanism in NbN-based superconducting single photon detectors (SSPDs). We demonstrate that the detection probability uniquely depends on a particular linear combination of bias current and energy, for a large variation of bias currents, input energies and detection probabilities, producing a universal detection curve. We obtain this result by studying multiphoton excitations in a nanodetector with a sparsity-based tomographic method that allows factoring out of the optical absorption. We discuss the implication of our model system for the understanding of meander-type SSPDs.
  • We perform quantum state reconstruction of coherent and thermal states with a detector which has an enhanced multiphoton response. The detector is based on superconducting nanowires, where the bias current sets the dependence of the click probability on the photon number; this bias current is used as tuning parameter in the state reconstruction. The nonlinear response makes our nanowire-based detector superior to the linear detectors that are conventionally used for quantum state reconstruction.
  • The ultrafast response of a high-reflectivity GaAs/AlAs Bragg mirror to optical pumping is investigated for all-optical switching applications. Both Kerr and free carrier nonlinearities are induced with 100 fs, 780 nm pulses with a fluence of 0.64 kJ/m^2 and 0.8 kJ/m^2. The absolute transmission of the mirror at 931 nm increases by a factor of 27 from 0.0024% to 0.065% on a picosecond timescale. These results demonstrate the potential for a high-reflectivity ultrafast switchable mirror for quantum optics and optical communication applications. A design is proposed for a structure to be pumped below the bandgaps of the semiconductor mirror materials. Theoretical calculations on this structure show switching ratios up to 2200 corresponding to switching from 0.017% to 37.4% transmission.
  • Non-linear photonic crystals can be used to provide phase-matching for frequency conversion in optically isotropic materials. The phase-matching mechanism proposed here is a combination of form birefringence and phase velocity dispersion in a periodic structure. Since the phase-matching relies on the geometry of the photonic crystal, it becomes possible to use highly non-linear materials. This is illustrated considering a one-dimensional periodic Al$_{0.4}$Ga$_{0.6}$As / air structure for the generation of 1.5 $\mu$m light. We show that phase-matching conditions used in schemes to create entangled photon pairs can be achieved in photonic crystals.