• Thin liquid films are ubiquitous in natural phenomena and technological applications. They have been extensively studied via deterministic hydrodynamic equations, but thermal fluctuations often play a crucial role that needs to be understood. An example of this is dewetting, which involves the rupture of a thin liquid film and the formation of droplets. Such a process is thermally activated and requires fluctuations to be taken into account self-consistently. In this work we present an analytical and numerical study of a stochastic thin-film equation derived from first principles. Following a brief review of the derivation, we scrutinise the behaviour of the equation in the limit of perfectly correlated noise along the wall-normal direction. The stochastic thin-film equation is also simulated by adopting a numerical scheme based on a spectral collocation method. The scheme allows us to explore the fluctuating dynamics of the thin film and the behaviour of its free energy in the vicinity of rupture. Finally, we also study the effect of the noise intensity on the rupture time, which is in agreement with previous works.
  • Over the last few decades, classical density-functional theory (DFT) and its dynamic extensions (DDFTs) have become powerful tools in the study of colloidal fluids. Recently, previous DDFTs for spherically-symmetric particles have been generalised to take into account both inertia and hydrodynamic interactions, two effects which strongly influence non-equilibrium properties. The present work further generalises this framework to systems of anisotropic particles. Starting from the Liouville equation and utilising Zwanzig's projection-operator techniques, we derive the kinetic equation for the Brownian particle distribution function, and by averaging over all but one particle, a DDFT equation is obtained. Whilst this equation has some similarities with DDFTs for spherically-symmetric colloids, it involves a translational-rotational coupling which affects the diffusivity of the (asymmetric) particles. We further show that, in the overdamped (high friction) limit, the DDFT is considerably simplified and is in agreement with a previous DDFT for colloids with arbitrary shape particles.
  • Classical nucleation theory (CNT) is the most widely used framework to describe the early stage of first-order phase transitions. Unfortunately the different points of view adopted to derive it yield different kinetic equations for the probability density function, e.g. Zeldovich-Frenkel or Becker-D\"oring-Tunitskii equations. Starting from a phenomenological stochastic differential equation a unified equation is obtained in this work. In other words, CNT expressions are recovered by selecting one or another stochastic calculus. Moreover, it is shown that the unified CNT thus obtained produces the same Fokker-Planck equation as that from a recent update of CNT [J.F. Lutsko and M.A. Dur\'an-Olivencia, J. Chem. Phys., 2013, 138, 244908] when mass transport is governed by diffusion. Finally, we derive a general induction-time expression along with specific approximations of it to be used under different scenarios. In particular, when the mass-transport mechanism is governed by direct impingement, volume diffusion, surface diffusion or interface transfer.
  • Classical nucleation theory has been recently reformulated based on fluctuating hydrodynamics [J.F. Lutsko and M.A. Dur\'{a}n-Olivencia, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244908 (2013)]. The present work extends this effort to the case of nucleation in confined systems such as small pores and vesicles. The finite available mass imposes a maximal supercritical cluster size and prohibits nucleation altogether if the system is too small. We quantity the effect of system size on the nuceation rate. We also discuss the effect of relaxing the capillary-model assumption of zero interfacial width resulting in significant changes in the nucleation barrier and nucleation rate.
  • A two-variable stochastic model for diffusion-limited nucleation is developed using a formalism derived from fluctuating hydrodynamics. The model is a direct generalization of the standard Classical Nucleation Theory. The nucleation rate and pathway are calculated in the weak-noise approximation and are shown to be in good agreement with direct numerical simulations for the weak-solution/strong-solution transition in globular proteins. We find that Classical Nucleation Theory underestimates the time needed for the formation of a critical cluster by two orders of magnitude and that this discrepancy is due to the more complex dynamics of the two variable model and not, as often is assumed, a result of errors in the estimation of the free energy barrier.
  • In this work a phenomenological stochastic differential equation is proposed to model the time evolution of the radius of a pre-critical molecular cluster during nucleation (the classical order parameter). Such a stochastic differential equation constitutes the basis for the calculation of the (nucleation) induction time under Kramers' theory of thermally activated escape processes. Considering the nucleation stage as a Poisson rare-event, analytical expressions for the induction time statistics are deduced for both steady and unsteady conditions, the latter assuming the semiadiabatic limit. These expressions can be used to identify the underlying mechanism of molecular cluster formation (distinguishing between homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation from the nucleation statistics is possible) as well as to predict induction times and induction time distributions. The predictions of this model are in good agreement with experimentally measured induction times at constant temperature, unlike the values obtained from the classical equation, but agreement is not so good for induction time statistics. Stochastic simulations truncated to the maximum waiting time of the experiments confirm that this fact is due to the time constraints imposed by experiments. Correcting for this effect, the experimental and predicted curves fit remarkably well. Thus, the proposed model seems to be a versatile tool to predict cluster size distributions, nucleation rates, (nucleation) induction time and induction time statistics for a wide range of conditions (e.g. time-dependent temperature, supersaturation, pH, etc.) where classical nucleation theory is of limited applicability.
  • It is shown that diffusion-limited classical nucleation theory (CNT) can be recovered as a simple limit of the recently proposed dynamical theory of nucleation based on fluctuating hydrodynamics (Lutsko, JCP 136, 034509 (2012)). The same framework is also used to construct a more realistic theory in which clusters have finite interfacial width. When applied to the dilute solution/dense solution transition in globular proteins, it is found that the extension gives corrections to the the nucleation rate even for the case of small supersaturations due to changes in the monomer distribution function and to the excess free energy. It is also found that the monomer attachement/detachment picture breaks down at high supersaturations corresponding to clusters smaller than about 100 molecules. The results also confirm the usual assumption that most important corrections to CNT can be acheived by means of improved estimates of the free energy barrier. The theory also illustrates two topics that have received considerable attention in the recent literature on nucleation: the importance sub-dominant corrections to the capillary model for the free energy and of the correct choice of the reaction coordinate.