• We report on the behaviour of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) developed for muon detection in ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) experiments. The RPCs were developed for the MARTA project and were tested on field conditions. These RPCs cover an area of $1.5 \times 1.2\,{m^2}$ and are instrumented with 64 pickup electrodes providing a segmentation better than $20\,$cm. By shielding the detector units with enough slant mass to absorb the electromagnetic component in the air showers, a clean measurement of the muon content is allowed, a concept to be implemented in a next generation of UHECR experiments. The operation of a ground array detector poses challenging demands, as the RPC must operate remotely under extreme environmental conditions, with limited budgets for power and minimal maintenance. The RPC, DAQ, High Voltage and monitoring systems are enclosed in an aluminium-sealed case, providing a compact and robust unit suited for outdoor environments, which can be easily deployed and connected. The RPCs developed at LIP-Coimbra are able to operate using a very low gas flux, which allows running them for few years with a small gas reservoir. Several prototypes have already been built and tested both in the laboratory and outdoors. We report on the most recent tests done in the field that show that the developed RPCs have operated in a stable way for more than 2 years in field conditions.
  • Bringing transparency to black-box decision making systems (DMS) has been a topic of increasing research interest in recent years. Traditional active and passive approaches to make these systems transparent are often limited by scalability and/or feasibility issues. In this paper, we propose a new notion of black-box DMS transparency, named, temporal transparency, whose goal is to detect if/when the DMS policy changes over time, and is mostly invariant to the drawbacks of traditional approaches. We map our notion of temporal transparency to time series changepoint detection methods, and develop a framework to detect policy changes in real-world DMS's. Experiments on New York Stop-question-and-frisk dataset reveal a number of publicly announced and unannounced policy changes, highlighting the utility of our framework.
  • An established technique for the measurement of ultra-high-energy-cosmic-rays is the detection of the fluorescence light induced in the atmosphere of the Earth, by means of telescopes equipped with photomultiplier tubes. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) promise an increase in the photon detection efficiency which outperforms conventional photomultiplier tubes. In combination with their compact package, a moderate bias voltage of several ten volt and single photon resolution, the use of SiPMs can improve the energy and spatial resolution of air fluorescence measurements, and lead to a gain in information on the primary particle. Though, drawbacks like a high dark-noise-rate and a strong temperature dependency have to be managed. FAMOUS is a refracting telescope prototype instrumented with 64 SiPMs of which the main optical element is a Fresnel lens of 549.7 mm diameter and 502.1 mm focal length. The sensitive area of the SiPMs is increased by a special light collection system consisting of Winston cones. The total field of view of the telescope is approximately 12 $^\circ$. The frontend electronics automatically compensates for the temperature dependency of the SiPMs and will provide trigger information for the readout. Already for this prototype, the Geant4 detector simulation indicates full detection efficiency of extensive air showers of $E=10^{18}\,\text{eV}$ up to a distance of 6 km. We present the first working version of FAMOUS with a focal plane prototype providing seven active pixels.