• Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials are unique in the wide variety of structural and electronic phases they exhibit in the two-dimensional (2D) single-layer limit. Here we show how such polymorphic flexibility can be used to achieve topological states at highly ordered phase boundaries in a new quantum spin Hall insulator (QSHI), 1T'-WSe2. We observe helical states at the crystallographically-aligned interface between quantum a spin Hall insulating domain of 1T'-WSe2 and a semiconducting domain of 1H-WSe2 in contiguous single layers grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The QSHI nature of single-layer 1T'-WSe2 was verified using ARPES to determine band inversion around a 120 meV energy gap, as well as STM spectroscopy to directly image helical edge-state formation. Using this new edge-state geometry we are able to directly confirm the predicted penetration depth of a helical interface state into the 2D bulk of a QSHI for a well-specified crystallographic direction. The clean, well-ordered topological/trivial interfaces observed here create new opportunities for testing predictions of the microscopic behavior of topologically protected boundary states without the complication of structural disorder.
  • Scattering of electrons by localized spins is the ultimate process enabling electrical detection and control of the magnetic state of a spin-doped material. At the molecular scale, this scattering is mediated by the electronic orbitals hosting the spin. Here we report the selective excitation of a molecular spin by electrons tunneling through different molecular orbitals. Spatially-resolved tunneling spectra on iron porphyrins on Au(111) reveal that the inelastic spin excitation extends beyond the iron site. The inelastic features also change shape and symmetry along the molecule. Combining DFT simulations with a phenomenological scattering model, we show that the extension and lineshape variations of the inelastic signal are due to excitation pathways assisted by different frontier orbitals, each of them with a different degree of hybridization with the surface. By selecting the intramolecular site for electron injection, the relative weight of iron and pyrrole orbitals in the tunneling process is modified. In this way, the spin excitation mechanism, reflected by its spectral lineshape, changes depending on the degree of localization and energy alignment of the chosen molecular orbital.
  • We show that the magnetic ordering of coupled atomic dimers on a superconductor is revealed by their intra-gap spectral features. Chromium atoms on the superconductor $\beta$-Bi$_2$Pd surface display Yu-Shiba-Rusinov bound states, detected as pairs of intra-gap excitations in the tunneling spectra. We formed Cr dimers by atomic manipulation and found that their intra-gap features appear either shifted or split with respect to single atoms. The spectral variations reveal that the magnetic coupling of the dimer changes between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic depending on its disposition on the surface, in good agreement with density functional theory simulations. These results prove that superconducting intra-gap state spectroscopy is an accurate tool to detect the magnetic ordering of atomic scale structures.
  • A quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator is a novel two-dimensional quantum state of matter that features quantized Hall conductance in the absence of magnetic field, resulting from topologically protected dissipationless edge states that bridge the energy gap opened by band inversion and strong spin-orbit coupling. By investigating electronic structure of epitaxially grown monolayer 1T'-WTe2 using angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and first principle calculations, we observe clear signatures of the topological band inversion and the band gap opening, which are the hallmarks of a QSH state. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements further confirm the correct crystal structure and the existence of a bulk band gap, and provide evidence for a modified electronic structure near the edge that is consistent with the expectations for a QSH insulator. Our results establish monolayer 1T'-WTe2 as a new class of QSH insulator with large band gap in a robust two-dimensional materials family of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs).
  • High quality WSe2 films have been grown on bilayer graphene (BLG) with layer-by-layer control of thickness using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The combination of angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES), scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS), and optical absorption measurements reveal the atomic and electronic structures evolution and optical response of WSe2/BLG. We observe that a bilayer of WSe2 is a direct bandgap semiconductor, when integrated in a BLG-based heterostructure, thus shifting the direct-indirect band gap crossover to trilayer WSe2. In the monolayer limit, WSe2 shows a spin-splitting of 475 meV in the valence band at the K point, the largest value observed among all the MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se) materials. The exciton binding energy of monolayer-WSe2/BLG is found to be 0.21 eV, a value that is orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional 3D semiconductors, yet small as compared to other 2D transition metal dichalcogennides (TMDCs) semiconductors. Finally, our finding regarding the overall modification of the electronic structure by an alkali metal surface electron doping opens a route to further control the electronic properties of TMDCs.
  • Properties of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are highly sensitive to the presence of defects in the crystal structure. A detailed understanding of defect structure may lead to control of material properties through defect engineering. Here we provide direct evidence for the existence of isolated, one-dimensional charge density waves at mirror twin boundaries in single-layer MoSe2. Our low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy measurements reveal a substantial bandgap of 60 - 140 meV opening at the Fermi level in the otherwise one dimensional metallic structure. We find an energy-dependent periodic modulation in the density of states along the mirror twin boundary, with a wavelength of approximately three lattice constants. The modulations in the density of states above and below the Fermi level are spatially out of phase, consistent with charge density wave order. In addition to the electronic characterization, we determine the atomic structure and bonding configuration of the one-dimensional mirror twin boundary by means of high-resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy. Density functional theory calculations reproduce both the gap opening and the modulations of the density of states.
  • Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are ideal systems for exploring the effects of dimensionality on correlated electronic phases such as charge density wave (CDW) order and superconductivity. In bulk NbSe2 a CDW sets in at TCDW = 33 K and superconductivity sets in at Tc = 7.2 K. Below Tc these electronic states coexist but their microscopic formation mechanisms remain controversial. Here we present an electronic characterization study of a single 2D layer of NbSe2 by means of low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and electrical transport measurements. We demonstrate that 3x3 CDW order in NbSe2 remains intact in 2D. Superconductivity also still remains in the 2D limit, but its onset temperature is depressed to 1.9 K. Our STS measurements at 5 K reveal a CDW gap of {\Delta} = 4 meV at the Fermi energy, which is accessible via STS due to the removal of bands crossing the Fermi level for a single layer. Our observations are consistent with the simplified (compared to bulk) electronic structure of single-layer NbSe2, thus providing new insight into CDW formation and superconductivity in this model strongly-correlated system.
  • Despite the weak nature of interlayer forces in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials, their properties are highly dependent on the number of layers in the few-layer two-dimensional (2D) limit. Here, we present a combined scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and GW theoretical study of the electronic structure of high quality single- and few-layer MoSe2 grown on bilayer graphene. We find that the electronic (quasiparticle) bandgap, a fundamental parameter for transport and optical phenomena, decreases by nearly one electronvolt when going from one layer to three due to interlayer coupling and screening effects. Our results paint a clear picture of the evolution of the electronic wave function hybridization in the valleys of both the valence and conduction bands as the number of layers is changed. This demonstrates the importance of layer number and electron-electron interactions on van der Waals heterostructures, and helps to clarify how their electronic properties might be tuned in future 2D nanodevices.
  • Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit novel electrical and optical properties and are emerging as a new platform for exploring 2D semiconductor physics. Reduced screening in 2D results in dramatically enhanced electron-electron interactions, which have been predicted to generate giant bandgap renormalization and excitonic effects. Currently, however, there is little direct experimental confirmation of such many-body effects in these materials. Here we present an experimental observation of extraordinarily large exciton binding energy in a 2D semiconducting TMD. We accomplished this by determining the single-particle electronic bandgap of single-layer MoSe2 via scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), as well as the two-particle exciton transition energy via photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). These quantities yield an exciton binding energy of 0.55 eV for monolayer MoSe2, a value that is orders of magnitude larger than what is seen in conventional 3D semiconductors. This finding is corroborated by our ab initio GW and Bethe Salpeter equation calculations, which include electron correlation effects. The renormalized bandgap and large exciton binding observed here will have a profound impact on electronic and optoelectronic device technologies based on single-layer semiconducting TMDs.
  • We provide a thorough study of a carbon divacancy, a fundamental but almost unexplored point defect in graphene. Low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging of irradiated graphene on different substrates enabled us to identify a common two-fold symmetry point defect. Our first principles calculations reveal that the structure of this type of defect accommodates two adjacent missing atoms in a rearranged atomic network formed by two pentagons and one octagon, with no dangling bonds. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements on divacancies generated in nearly ideal graphene show an electronic spectrum dominated by an empty-states resonance, which is ascribed to a spin-degenerated nearly flat band of $\pi$-electron nature. While the calculated electronic structure rules out the formation of a magnetic moment around the divacancy, the generation of an electronic resonance near the Fermi level, reveals divacancies as key point defects for tuning electron transport properties in graphene systems.
  • An important question in the physics of superconducting nanostructures is the role of thermal fluctuations on superconductivity in the zero-dimensional limit. Here, we probe the evolution of superconductivity as a function of temperature and particle size in single, isolated Pb nanoparticles. Accurate determination of the size and shape of each nanoparticle makes our system a good model to quantitatively compare the experimental findings with theoretical predictions. In particular, we study the role of thermal fluctuations (TF) on the tunneling density of states (DOS) and the superconducting energy gap (D) in these nanoparticles. For the smallest particles, h < 13nm, we clearly observe a finite energy gap beyond Tc giving rise to a "critical region". We show explicitly through quantitative theoretical calculations that these deviations from mean-field predictions are caused by TF. Moreover, for T << Tc, where TF are negligible, and typical sizes below 20 nm, we show that D gradually decreases with reduction in particle size. This result is described by a theoretical model that includes finite size effects and zero temperature leading order corrections to the mean field formalism.
  • In a zero-dimensional superconductor, quantum size effects(QSE) not only set the limit to superconductivity, but are also at the heart of new phenomena such as shell effects, which have been predicted to result in large enhancements of the superconducting energy gap. Here, we experimentally demonstrate these QSE through measurements on single, isolated Pb and Sn nanoparticles. In both systems superconductivity is ultimately quenched at sizes governed by the dominance of the quantum fluctuations of the order parameter. However, before the destruction of superconductivity, in Sn nanoparticles we observe giant oscillations in the superconducting energy gap with particle size leading to enhancements as large as 60%. These oscillations are the first experimental proof of coherent shell effects in nanoscale superconductors. Contrarily, we observe no such oscillations in the gap for Pb nanoparticles, which is ascribed to the suppression of shell effects for shorter coherence lengths. Our study paves the way to exploit QSE in boosting superconductivity in low-dimensional systems.