• The paper considers very general multivariate modifications of Cramer-Lundberg risk model. The claims can be of different types and can arrive in groups. The groups arrival processes within a type have constant intensities. The counting groups processes are dependent multivariate compound Poisson processes of type I. We allow empty groups and show that in that case we can find stochastically equivalent Cramer-Lundberg model with non-empty groups. The investigated model generalizes the risk model with common shocks, the Poisson risk process of order k, the Poisson negative binomial, the Polya-Aeppli, the Polya-Aeppli of order k among others. All of them with one or more types of polices. The relations between the numerical characteristics and distributions of the components of the risk processes are proven to be corollaries of the corresponding formulae of the Cramer-Lundberg risk model.
  • Complex Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) processes have various applications in statistical modelling. They play role e.g. in the description of the motion of a charged test particle in a constant magnetic field or in the study of rotating waves in time-dependent reaction diffusion systems, whereas Kolmogorov used such a process to model the so-called Chandler wobble, small deviation in the Earth's axis of rotation. In these applications parameter estimation and model fitting is based on discrete observations of the underlying stochastic process, however, the accuracy of the results strongly depend on the observation points. This paper studies the properties of D-optimal designs for estimating the parameters of a complex OU process with a trend. We show that in contrast with the case of the classical real OU process, a D-optimal design exists not only for the trend parameter, but also for joint estimation of the covariance parameters, moreover, these optimal designs are equidistant.
  • Confidence nets, that is, collections of confidence intervals that fill out the parameter space and whose exact parameter coverage can be computed, are familiar in nonparametric statistics. Here, the distributional assumptions are based on invariance under the action of a finite reflection group. Exact confidence nets are exhibited for a single parameter, based on the root system of the group. The main result is a formula for the generating function of the coverage interval probabilities. The proof makes use of the theory of "buildings" and the Chevalley factorization theorem for the length distribution on Cayley graphs of finite reflection groups.
  • The interest rates (or nominal yields) can be negative, this is an unavoidable fact which has already been visible during the Great Depression (1929-39). Nowadays we can find negative rates easily by e.g. auditing. Several theoretical and practical ideas how to model and eventually overcome empirical negative rates can be suggested, however, they are far beyond a simple practical realization. In this paper we discuss the dynamical reasons why negative interest rates can happen in the second order differential dynamics and how they can influence the variance and expectation of the interest rate process. Such issues are highly practical, involving e.g. banking sector and pension securities.
  • A.N. Kolmogorov proposed several problems on stochastic processes, which has been rarely addressed later on. One of the open problems are stochastic processes with discontinuous covariance function. For example, semicontinuous covariance functions have been used in regression and kriging by many authors in statistics recently. In this paper we introduce purely topologically defined regularity conditions on covariance kernels which are still applicable for increasing and infill domain asymptotics for regression problems, kriging and finance. These conditions are related to semicontinuous maps of Ornstein Uhlenbeck (OU) processes. Beside this new regularity conditions relax the continuity of covariance function by consideration of semicontinuous covariance. We provide several novel applications of the introduced class for optimal design of random fields, random walks in finance and probabilities of ruins related to shocks, e.g. by earthquakes. In particular we construct a random walk model with semicontinuous covariance.
  • Asymptotic normality of extreme value tail estimators received much attention in the literature, giving rise to increasingly complicated 2nd order regularity conditions. However, such conditions are really difficult to be checked for real data. Especially it is difficult or impossible to check such conditions using small samples. Beside that most of those conditions suffer from the drawback of a potentially singular integral representations. However, we can have various orders of approximation by normal distributions, e.g. Berry-Essen Types and Edgeworth types. In this paper we indicate that for Berry-Essen Types of normal approximation and related asymptotic normality of generalized Hill estimators, we do not necessarily need 2nd order regularity conditions and we can apply only Karamata's representation for regularly varying tails. 2nd order regularity conditions however better relates to Edgeworth types of normal approximations, albeit requiring larger data samples for their proper check. Finally both expansions are prone for bootstrap and other subsampling techniques. All existing results indicate that proper representation of tail behavior play a special and somewhat intriguing role in that context. We dispel that widespread opinion by providing a full characterization and representation, in a general regular variation context, of the integral singularity phenomenon, highlighting its relation to an asymptotical normality of the Generalized Hill estimator without the 2nd order condition. Thus application of this new methodology is simple and much more flexible, optimal for real data sets. Alternative and powerful versions of the Hill plot are also introduced and illustrated on ecological data of snow extremes from Slovakia.
  • This is "Letter to the Editor" of Annals of Applied Statistics, addressing the paper by Goerg G. M. (2011) "Lambert W random variables-a new family of generalized skewed distributions with applications to risk estimation".
  • The understanding of methane emission and methane absorption plays a central role both in the atmosphere and on the surface of the Earth. Several important ecological processes, e.g., ebullition of methane and its natural microergodicity request better designs for observations in order to decrease variability in parameter estimation. Thus, a crucial fact, before the measurements are taken, is to give an optimal design of the sites where observations should be collected in order to stabilize the variability of estimators. In this paper we introduce a realistic parametric model of covariance and provide theoretical and numerical results on optimal designs. For parameter estimation D-optimality, while for prediction integrated mean square error and entropy criteria are used. We illustrate applicability of obtained benchmark designs for increasing/measuring the efficiency of the engineering designs for estimation of methane rate in various temperature ranges and under different correlation parameters. We show that in most situations these benchmark designs have higher efficiency.
  • Measurement on sets with a specific geometric shape can be of interest for many important applications (e.g. measurement along the isotherms in structural engineering). In the present paper the properties of optimal designs for estimating the parameters of shifted Ornstein-Uhlenbeck sheets, that is Gaussian two-variable random fields with exponential correlation structures, are investigated when the processes are observed on monotonic sets. Substantial differences are demonstrated between the cases when one is interested only in trend parameters and when the whole parameter set is of interest. The theoretical results are illustrated by computer experiments and simulated examples from the field of structure engineering. From the design point of view the most interesting finding of the paper is the loss of efficiency of the regular grid design compared to the optimal monotonic design.