• Strong charge-spin coupling is found in a layered transition-metal trichalcogenide NiPS3, a van derWaals antiferromagnet, from our study of the electronic structure using several experimental and theoretical tools: spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy, and density-functional calculations. NiPS3 displays an anomalous shift in the optical spectral weight at the magnetic ordering temperature, reflecting a strong coupling between the electronic and magnetic structures. X-ray absorption, photoemission and optical spectra support a self-doped ground state in NiPS3. Our work demonstrates that layered transition-metal trichalcogenide magnets are a useful candidate for the study of correlated-electron physics in two-dimensional magnetic material.
  • SrRuO$_3$ (SRO113) is an important material for device physics particularly as one of the best metallic oxide electrodes for ferroelectric devices. This oxide has moderate electron correlations with novel properties including ferromagnetic ordering, which can be utilized in future to spintronics and superconducting spintronics devices. Recently, we observed strongly enhanced magnetization of SRO113 thin films grown on single crystals of the spin-triplet superconductor Sr$_2$RuO$_4$ (SRO214). To clarify the origin of such an enhancement, we conducted systematic investigations of magnetic properties of SRO113 films deposited on a variety of oxide substrates. We carefully subtracted the substrate contributions and found that the enhanced 2 magnetization occurs only for SRO113/SRO214 films. We further found that neither strain nor metallicity of the substrate plays any significant roles in the enhancement. The X-ray magnetic circular dichroism reveals that the substrate-induced strain does not switch the Ru4+ state from the low-spin to high-spin states. The film-thickness dependence of the magnetization of SRO113/SRO214 films strongly suggest that the additional magnetization arises due to the induction of magnetic moment into the SRO214 substrate over 20-nm depth. Our results imply new magnetic functionality that can trigger studies searching for yet unknown physical phenomena in magnetic ruthenates.