• The objective of the present paper is to prove cluster multiplication theorem in the quantum cluster algebra of type $A_{2}^{(2)}$. As corollaries, we obtain bar-invariant $\mathbb{Z}[q^{\pm\frac{1}{2}}]$-bases established in [6], and naturally deduce the positivity of the elements in these bases. One bar-invariant basis as the triangular basis of this quantum cluster algebra is also explicitly described.
  • In this paper, we provide a performance analysis for practical unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)-enabled networks. By considering both line-of-sight (LoS) and non-line-of-sight (NLoS) transmissions between aerial base stations (BSs) and ground users, the coverage probability and the area spectral efficiency (ASE) are derived. Considering that there is no consensus on the path loss model for studying UAVs in the literature, in this paper, three path loss models, i.e., high-altitude model, low-altitude model and ultra-low-altitude model, are investigated and compared. Moreover, the lower bound of the network performance is obtained assuming that UAVs are hovering randomly according to homogeneous Poisson point process (HPPP), while the upper bound is derived assuming that UAVs can instantaneously move to the positions directly overhead ground users. From our analytical and simulation results for a practical UAV height of 50 meters, we find that the network performance of the high-altitude model and the low-altitude model exhibit similar trends, while that of the ultra-low-altitude model deviates significantly from the above two models. In addition, the optimal density of UAVs to maximize the coverage probability performance has also been investigated.
  • We report the latest results of searching for possible new macro-scale spin-spin-velocity-dependent forces (SSVDFs) based on specially designed iron-shielded SmCo$_5$ (ISSC) spin sources and a spin exchange relaxation free (SERF) co-magnetometer. The ISSCs have high net electron spin densities of about $1.7\times 10^{21}$ cm$^{-3}$, which mean high detecting sensitivity; and low magnetic field leakage of about $\sim$mG level due to iron shielding, which means low detecting noise. With help from the ISSCs, the high sensitivity SERF co-magnetometer, and the similarity analysis method, new constraints on SSVDFs with forms of $V_{6+7}$, $V_8$, $V_{15}$, and $V_{16}$ have been obtained, which represent the tightest limits in force range of 5 cm -- 1 km to the best of our knowledge.
  • From very recent studies, the area spectral efficiency (ASE) performance of downlink (DL) cellular networks will continuously decrease and finally to zero with the network densification in a fully loaded ultra-dense network (UDN) when the absolute height difference between a base station (BS) antenna and a user equipment (UE) antenna is larger than zero, which is referred as the ASE Crash. We revisit this issue by considering the impact of the BS antenna downtilt on the downlink network capacity. In general, there exists a height difference between a BS and a UE in practical networks. It is common to utilize antenna downtilt to adjust the direction of the vertical antenna pattern, and thus increase received signal power or reduce inter-cell interference power to improve network performance. This paper focuses on investigating the relationship between the base station antenna downtilt and the downlink network capacity in terms of the coverage probability and the ASE. The analytical results of the coverage probability and the ASE are derived, and we find that there exists an optimal antenna downtilt to achieve the maximal coverage probability for each base station density. Moreover, we derive numerically solvable expressions for the optimal antenna downtilt, which is a function of the base station density. Our theoretical and numerical results show that after applying the optimal antenna downtilt, the network performance can be improved significantly. Specifically, with the optimal antenna downtilt, the ASE crash can be delayed by nearly one order of magnitude in terms of the base station density.
  • In this paper, by means of simulations, we evaluate the uplink (UL) performance of an Internet of Things (IoT) capable ultra-dense network (UDN) in terms of the coverage probability and the density of reliably working user equipments (UEs). From our study, we show the benefits and challenges that UL IoT UDNs will bring about in the future. In more detail, for a low-reliability criterion, such as achieving a UL signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) above 0 dB, the density of reliably working UEs grows quickly with the network densification, showing the potential of UL IoT UDNs. In contrast, for a high-reliability criterion, such as achieving a UL SINR above 10 dB, the density of reliably working UEs remains to be low in UDNs due to excessive inter-cell interference, which should be considered when operating UL IoT UDNs. Moreover, considering the existence of a non-zero antenna height difference between base stations (BSs) and UEs, the density of reliably working UEs could even decrease as we deploy more BSs. This calls for the usage of sophisticated interference management schemes and/or beam steering/shaping technologies in UL IoT UDNs.
  • Considering both non-line-of-sight (NLoS) and line-of-sight (LoS) transmissions, the transitional behaviors from noise-limited regime to dense interference-limited regime have been investigated for the fifth generation (5G) small cell networks (SCNs). Besides, we identify four performance regimes based on base station (BS) density, i.e., (i) the noise-limited regime, (ii) the signal-dominated regime, (iii) the interference-dominated regime, and (iv) the interference-limited regime. To characterize the performance regime, we propose a unified framework analyzing the future 5G wireless networks over generalized shadowing/fading channels, in which the user association schemes based on the strongest instantaneous received power (SIRP) and the strongest average received power (SARP) can be studied, while NLoS/LoS transmissions and multi-slop path loss model are considered. Simulation results indicate that different factors, i.e., noise, desired signal, and interference, successively and separately dominate the network performance with the increase of BS density. Hence, our results shed new light on the design and management of SCNs in urban and rural areas with different BS deployment densities.
  • Millimeter wave is a promising technology for the next generation of wireless systems. As it is well-known for its high path loss, the systems working in this spectrum tend to exploit the shorter wavelength to equip the transceivers with a large number of antennas to overcome the path loss issue. The large number of antennas leads to large channel matrices and consequently a challenging channel estimation problem. The channel estimation algorithms that have been proposed so far either neglect the probability of estimation error or require a high feedback overload from receivers to ensure the target probability of estimation error. In this paper, we propose a multi-stage adaptive channel estimation algorithm called robust adaptive multi-feedback (RAF). The algorithm is based on using the estimated channel coefficient to predict a lower bound for the required number of measurements. Our simulations demonstrate that compared with existing algorithms, RAF can achieve the desired probability of estimation error while on average reducing the feedback overhead by 75.5% and the total channel estimation time by 14%.
  • In order to cope with the forecasted 1000x increase in wireless capacity demands by 2030, network operators will aggressively densify their network infrastructure to reuse the spectrum as much as possible. However, it is important to realise that these new ultra-dense small cell networks are fundamentally different from the traditional macrocell or sparse small cell networks, and thus ultra-dense networks (UDNs) cannot be deployed and operated in the same way as in the last 25 years. In this paper, we systematically investigate and visualise the performance impacts of several fundamental characteristics of UDNs, that mobile operators and vendors should consider when deploying UDNs. Moreover, we also provide new deployment and management guidelines to address the main challenges brought by UDNs in the future.
  • The aggressive spatial spectrum reuse (SSR) by network densification using smaller cells has successfully driven the wireless communication industry onward in the past decades. In our future journey toward ultra-dense networks (UDNs), a fundamental question needs to be answered. Is there a limit to SSR? In other words, when we deploy thousands or millions of small cell base stations (BSs) per square kilometer, is activating all BSs on the same time/frequency resource the best strategy? In this paper, we present theoretical analyses to answer such question. In particular, we find that both the signal and interference powers become bounded in practical UDNs with a non-zero BS-to-UE antenna height difference and a finite UE density, which leads to a constant capacity scaling law. As a result, there exists an optimal SSR density that can maximize the network capacity. Hence, the limit to SSR should be considered in the operation of future UDNs.
  • In this paper, we theoretically study the proportional fair (PF) scheduler in the context of ultra-dense networks (UDNs). Analytical results are obtained for the coverage probability and the area spectral efficiency (ASE) performance of dense small cell networks (SCNs) with the PF scheduler employed at base stations (BSs). The key point of our analysis is that the typical user is no longer a random user as assumed in most studies in the literature. Instead, a user with the maximum PF metric is chosen by its serving BS as the typical user. By comparing the previous results of the round-robin (RR) scheduler with our new results of the PF scheduler, we quantify the loss of the multi-user diversity of the PF scheduler with the network densification, which casts a new look at the role of the PF scheduler in UDNs. Our conclusion is that the RR scheduler should be used in UDNs to simplify the radio resource management (RRM).
  • In this paper, we present a new and significant theoretical discovery. If the absolute height difference between base station (BS) antenna and user equipment (UE) antenna is larger than zero, then the network performance in terms of both the coverage probability and the area spectral efficiency (ASE) will continuously decrease toward zero as the BS density increases for ultra-dense (UD) small cell networks (SCNs). Such findings are completely different from the conclusions in existing works, both quantitatively and qualitatively. In particular, this performance behavior has a tremendous impact on the deployment of UD SCNs in the 5th-generation (5G) era. Network operators may invest large amounts of money in deploying more network infrastructure to only obtain an even less network capacity. Our study results reveal that one way to address this issue is to lower the SCN BS antenna height to the UE antenna height. However, this requires a revolutionized approach of BS architecture and deployment, which is explored in this paper too.
  • In this paper, we conduct performance evaluation for Ultra-Dense Networks (UDNs), and identify which modelling factors play major roles and minor roles. From our study, we draw the following conclusions. First, there are 3 factors/models that have a major impact on the performance of UDNs, and they should be considered when performing theoretical analyses: i) a multi-piece path loss model with line-of-sight (LoS) and non-lineof- sight (NLoS) transmissions; ii) a non-zero antenna height difference between base stations (BSs) and user equipments (UEs); iii) a finite BS/UE density. Second, there are 4 factors/models that have a minor impact on the performance of UDNs, i.e., changing the results quantitatively but not qualitatively, and thus their incorporation into theoretical analyses is less urgent: i) a general multi-path fading model based on Rician fading; ii) a correlated shadow fading model; iii) a BS density dependent transmission power; iv) a deterministic BS/user density. Finally, there are 5 factors/models for future study: i) a BS vertical antenna pattern; ii) multi-antenna and/or multi-BS joint transmissions; iii) a proportional fair BS scheduler; iv) a non-uniform distribution of BSs; v) a dynamic time division duplex (TDD) or full duplex (FD) network. Our conclusions can guide researchers to downselect the assumptions in their theoretical analyses, so as to avoid unnecessarily complicated results, while still capturing the fundamentals of UDNs in a meaningful way.
  • Small cell networks (SCNs) are envisioned to embrace dynamic time division duplexing (TDD) in order to tailor downlink (DL)/uplink (UL) subframe resources to quick variations and burstiness of DL/UL traffic. The study of dynamic TDD is particularly important because it provides valuable insights on the full duplex transmission technology, which has been identified as one of the candidate technologies for the 5th-generation (5G) networks. Up to now, the existing works on dynamic TDD have shown that the UL of dynamic TDD suffers from severe performance degradation due to the strong DL-to-UL interference in the physical (PHY) layer. This conclusion raises a fundamental question: Despite such obvious technology disadvantage, what is the true value of dynamic TDD? In this paper, we answer this question from a media access control (MAC) layer viewpoint and present analytical results on the DL/UL time resource utilization (TRU) of synchronous dynamic TDD, which has been widely adopted in the existing 4th-generation (4G) systems. Our analytical results shed new light on the dynamic TDD in future synchronous 5G networks.
  • In this paper, we present a new and significant theoretical discovery. If the absolute height difference between base station (BS) antenna and user equipment (UE) antenna is larger than zero, then the network capacity performance in terms of the area spectral efficiency (ASE) will continuously decrease as the BS density increases for ultra-dense (UD) small cell networks (SCNs). This performance behavior has a tremendous impact on the deployment of UD SCNs in the 5th-generation (5G) era. Network operators may invest large amounts of money in deploying more network infrastructure to only obtain an even worse network performance. Our study results reveal that it is a must to lower the SCN BS antenna height to the UE antenna height to fully achieve the capacity gains of UD SCNs in 5G. However, this requires a revolutionized approach of BS architecture and deployment, which is explored in this paper too.
  • Very recent studies showed that in a fully loaded dense small cell network (SCN), the coverage probability performance will continuously decrease with the network densification. Such new results were captured in IEEE ComSoc Technology News with an alarming title of "Will Densification Be the Death of 5G?". In this paper, we revisit this issue from more practical views of realistic network deployment, such as a finite number of active base stations (BSs) and user equipments (UEs), a decreasing BS transmission power with the network densification, etc. Particularly, in dense SCNs, due to an oversupply of BSs with respect to UEs, a large number of BSs can be put into idle modes without signal transmission, if there is no active UE within their coverage areas. Setting those BSs into idle modes mitigates unnecessary inter-cell interference and reduces energy consumption. In this paper, we investigate the performance impact of such BS idle mode capability (IMC) on dense SCNs. Different from existing work, we consider a realistic path loss model incorporating both line-of-sight (LoS) and non-line-of-sight (NLoS) transmissions. Moreover, we obtain analytical results for the coverage probability, the area spectral efficiency (ASE) and the energy efficiency (EE) performance for SCNs with the BS IMC and show that the performance impact of the IMC on dense SCNs is significant. As the BS density surpasses the UE density in dense SCNs, the coverage probability will continuously increase toward one, addressing previous concerns on "the death of 5G". Finally, the performance improvement in terms of the EE performance is also investigated for dense SCNs using practical energy models developed in the Green-Touch project.
  • In this paper, we study the impact of the base station (BS) idle mode capability (IMC) on the network performance in dense small cell networks (SCNs). Different from existing works, we consider a sophisticated path loss model incorporating both line-of-sight (LoS) and non-line-of-sight (NLoS) transmissions. Analytical results are obtained for the coverage probability and the area spectral efficiency (ASE) performance for SCNs with IMCs at the BSs. The upper bound, the lower bound and the approximate expression of the activated BS density are also derived. The performance impact of the IMC is shown to be significant. As the BS density surpasses the UE density, thus creating a surplus of BSs, the coverage probability will continuously increase toward one. For the practical regime of the BS density, the results derived from our analysis are distinctively different from existing results, and thus shed new light on the deployment and the operation of future dense SCNs.
  • In this paper, we propose a new approach of network performance analysis, which is based on our previous works on the deterministic network analysis using the Gaussian approximation (DNA-GA). First, we extend our previous works to a signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) analysis, which makes our DNA-GA analysis a formal microscopic analysis tool. Second, we show two approaches for upgrading the DNA-GA analysis to a macroscopic analysis tool. Finally, we perform a comparison between the proposed DNA-GA analysis and the existing macroscopic analysis based on stochastic geometry. Our results show that the DNA-GA analysis possesses a few special features: (i) shadow fading is naturally considered in the DNAGA analysis; (ii) the DNA-GA analysis can handle non-uniform user distributions and any type of multi-path fading; (iii) the shape and/or the size of cell coverage areas in the DNA-GA analysis can be made arbitrary for the treatment of hotspot network scenarios. Thus, DNA-GA analysis is very useful for the network performance analysis of the 5th generation (5G) systems with general cell deployment and user distribution, both on a microscopic level and on a macroscopic level.
  • In this paper, we analytically derive an upper bound on the error in approximating the uplink (UL) single-cell interference by a lognormal distribution in frequency division multiple access (FDMA) small cell networks (SCNs). Such an upper bound is measured by the Kolmogorov Smirnov (KS) distance between the actual cumulative density function (CDF) and the approximate CDF. The lognormal approximation is important because it allows tractable network performance analysis. Our results are more general than the existing works in the sense that we do not pose any requirement on (i) the shape and/or size of cell coverage areas, (ii) the uniformity of user equipment (UE) distribution, and (iii) the type of multi-path fading. Based on our results, we propose a new framework to directly and analytically investigate a complex network with practical deployment of multiple BSs placed at irregular locations, using a power lognormal approximation of the aggregate UL interference. The proposed network performance analysis is particularly useful for the 5th generation (5G) systems with general cell deployment and UE distribution.
  • In this paper, we introduce a sophisticated path loss model into the stochastic geometry analysis incorporating both line-of-sight (LoS) and non-line-of-sight (NLoS) transmissions to study their performance impact in small cell networks (SCNs). Analytical results are obtained on the coverage probability and the area spectral efficiency (ASE) assuming both a general path loss model and a special case of path loss model recommended by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) standards. The performance impact of LoS and NLoS transmissions in SCNs in terms of the coverage probability and the ASE is shown to be significant both quantitatively and qualitatively, compared with previous work that does not differentiate LoS and NLoS transmissions. Particularly, our analysis demonstrates that when the density of small cells is larger than a threshold, the network coverage probability will decrease as small cells become denser, which in turn makes the ASE suffer from a slow growth or even a notable decrease. For practical regime of small cell density, the performance results derived from our analysis are distinctively different from previous results, and shed new insights on the design and deployment of future dense/ultra-dense SCNs.
  • In this paper, for the first time, we analytically prove that the uplink (UL) inter-cell interference in frequency division multiple access (FDMA) small cell networks (SCNs) can be well approximated by a lognormal distribution under a certain condition. The lognormal approximation is vital because it allows tractable network performance analysis with closed-form expressions. The derived condition, under which the lognormal approximation applies, does not pose particular requirements on the shapes/sizes of user equipment (UE) distribution areas as in previous works. Instead, our results show that if a path loss related random variable (RV) associated with the UE distribution area, has a low ratio of the 3rd absolute moment to the variance, the lognormal approximation will hold. Analytical and simulation results show that the derived condition can be readily satisfied in future dense/ultra-dense SCNs, indicating that our conclusions are very useful for network performance analysis of the 5th generation (5G) systems with more general cell deployment beyond the widely used Poisson deployment.
  • We propose massive MIMO unlicensed (mMIMO-U) as a high-capacity solution for future indoor wireless networks operating in the unlicensed spectrum. Building upon massive MIMO (mMIMO), mMIMO-U incorporates additional key features, such as the capability of placing accurate radiation nulls towards coexisting nodes during the channel access and data transmission phases. We demonstrate the spectrum reuse and data rate improvements attained by mMIMO-U by comparing three practical deployments: single-antenna Wi-Fi, where an indoor operator deploys three single-antenna Wi-Fi access points (APs), and two other scenarios where the central AP is replaced by either a mMIMO AP or the proposed mMIMO-U AP. We show that upgrading the central AP with mMIMO-U provides increased channel access opportunities for all of them. Moreover, mMIMO-U achieves four-fold and seven-fold gains in median throughput when compared to traditional mMIMO and single-antenna setups, respectively.
  • We study a cellular networking scenario, called DroneCells, where miniaturized base stations (BSs) are mounted on flying drones to serve mobile users. We propose that the drones never stop, and move continuously within the cell in a way that reduces the distance between the BS and the serving users, thus potentially improving the spectral efficiency of the network. By considering the practical mobility constraints of commercial drones, we design drone mobility algorithms to improve the spectral efficiency of DroneCells. As the optimal problem is NP-hard, we propose a range of practically realizable heuristics with varying complexity and performance. Simulations show that, using the existing consumer drones, the proposed algorithms can readily improve spectral efficiency by 34\% and the 5-percentile packet throughput by 50\% compared to the scenario, where drones hover over fixed locations. More significant gains can be expected with more agile drones in the future. A surprising outcome is that the drones need to fly only at minimal speeds to achieve these gains, avoiding any negative effect on drone battery lifetime. We further demonstrate that the optimal solution provides only modest improvements over the best heuristic algorithm, which employs Game Theory to make mobility decisions for drone BSs.
  • This paper studies the impact of the base station (BS) idle mode capability (IMC) on the network performance of multi-tier and dense heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs). Different from most existing works that investigated network scenarios with an infinite number of user equipments (UEs), we consider a more practical setup with a finite number of UEs in our analysis. More specifically, we derive the probability of which BS tier a typical UE should associate to and the expression of the activated BS density in each tier. Based on such results, analytical expressions for the coverage probability and the area spectral efficiency (ASE) in each tier are also obtained. The impact of the IMC on the performance of all BS tiers is shown to be significant. In particular, there will be a surplus of BSs when the BS density in each tier exceeds the UE density, and the overall coverage probability as well as the ASE continuously increase when the BS IMC is applied. Such finding is distinctively different from that in existing work. Thus, our result sheds new light on the design and deployment of the future 5G HCNs.
  • With recent advancements in drone technology, researchers are now considering the possibility of deploying small cells served by base stations mounted on flying drones. A major advantage of such drone small cells is that the operators can quickly provide cellular services in areas of urgent demand without having to pre-install any infrastructure. Since the base station is attached to the drone, technically it is feasible for the base station to dynamic reposition itself in response to the changing locations of users for reducing the communication distance, decreasing the probability of signal blocking, and ultimately increasing the spectral efficiency. In this paper, we first propose distributed algorithms for autonomous control of drone movements, and then model and analyse the spectral efficiency performance of a drone small cell to shed new light on the fundamental benefits of dynamic repositioning. We show that, with dynamic repositioning, the spectral efficiency of drone small cells can be increased by nearly 100\% for realistic drone speed, height, and user traffic model and without incurring any major increase in drone energy consumption.
  • In this paper, using the stochastic geometry theory, we present a framework for analyzing the performance of device-to-device (D2D) communications underlaid uplink (UL) cellular networks. In our analysis, we consider a D2D mode selection criterion based on an energy threshold for each user equipment (UE). Specifically, a UE will operate in a cellular mode, if its received signal strength from the strongest base station (BS) is large than a threshold \beta. Otherwise, it will operate in a D2D mode. Furthermore, we consider a generalized log-normal shadowing in our analysis. The coverage probability and the area spectral efficiency (ASE) are derived for both the cellular network and the D2D one. Through our theoretical and numerical analyses, we quantify the performance gains brought by D2D communications and provide guidelines of selecting the parameters for network operations.