• Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers account for 1.5 million deaths worldwide. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection (ESD) is an advanced therapeutic endoscopy technique with superior clinical outcome due to the minimally invasive and en bloc removal of tumours. In the western world, ESD is seldom carried out, due to its complex and challenging nature. Various surgical systems are being developed to make this therapy accessible, however, these solutions have shown limited operational workspace, dexterity, or low force exertion capabilities. The current paper shows the ESD CYCLOPS system, a bimanual surgical robotic attachment that can be mounted at the end of any flexible endoscope. The system is able to achieve forces of up to 46N, and showed a mean error of 0.217mm during an elliptical tracing task. The workspace and instrument dexterity is shown by pre-clinical ex vivo trials, in which ESD is succesfully performed by a GI surgeon. The system is currently undergoing pre-clinical in vivo validation.
  • The rapid growth of Internet-of-things (IoT) and artificial intelligence applications have called forth a new computing paradigm--edge computing. In this paper, we study the suitability of deploying FPGAs for edge computing from the perspectives of throughput sensitivity to workload size, architectural adaptiveness to algorithm characteristics, and energy efficiency. This goal is accomplished by conducting comparison experiments on an Intel Arria 10 GX1150 FPGA and an Nvidia Tesla K40m GPU. The experiment results imply that the key advantages of adopting FPGAs for edge computing over GPUs are three-fold: 1) FPGAs can provide a consistent throughput invariant to the size of application workload, which is critical to aggregating individual service requests from various IoT sensors; (2) FPGAs offer both spatial and temporal parallelism at a fine granularity and a massive scale, which guarantees a consistently high performance for accelerating both high-concurrency and high-dependency algorithms; and (3) FPGAs feature 3-4 times lower power consumption and up to 30.7 times better energy efficiency, offering better thermal stability and lower energy cost per functionality.
  • This paper considers a two-hop network consisting of a source, two parallel half-duplex relay nodes, and two destinations. While the destinations have an adequate power supply, the source and relay nodes rely on harvested energy for data transmission. Different from all existing works, the two relay nodes can also transfer their harvested energy to each other. For such a system, an optimization problem is formulated with the objective of maximizing the total data rate and conserving the source and relays transmission energy, where any extra energy saved in the current transmission cycle can be used in the next cycle. It turns out that the optimal solutions for this problem can be either found in a closed form or through one-dimensional searches, depending on the scenario. Simulation results based on both the average data rate and the outage probability show that energy cooperation between the two relays consistently improves the system performance.
  • Short-period planets exhibit day-night temperature contrasts of hundreds to thousands of degrees K. They also exhibit eastward hotspot offsets whereby the hottest region on the planet is east of the substellar point; this has been widely interpreted as advection of heat due to eastward winds. We present thermal phase observations of the hot Jupiter CoRoT-2b obtained with the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. These measurements show the most robust detection to date of a westward hotspot offset of 23 $\pm$ 4 degrees, in contrast with the nine other planets with equivalent measurements. The peculiar infrared flux map of CoRoT-2b may result from westward winds due to non-synchronous rotation magnetic effects, or partial cloud coverage, that obscures the emergent flux from the planet's eastern hemisphere. Non-synchronous rotation and magnetic effects may also explain the planet's anomalously large radius. On the other hand, partial cloud coverage could explain the featureless dayside emission spectrum of the planet. If CoRoT-2b is not tidally locked, then it means that our understanding of star-planet tidal interaction is incomplete. If the westward offset is due to magnetic effects, our result represents an opportunity to study an exoplanet's magnetic field. If it has Eastern clouds, then it means that our understanding of large-scale circulation on tidally locked planets is incomplete.
  • We demonstrate a path to hitherto unachievable differential photometric precisions from the ground, both in the optical and near-infrared (NIR), using custom-fabricated beam-shaping diffusers produced using specialized nanofabrication techniques. Such diffusers mold the focal plane image of a star into a broad and stable top-hat shape, minimizing photometric errors due to non-uniform pixel response, atmospheric seeing effects, imperfect guiding, and telescope-induced variable aberrations seen in defocusing. This PSF reshaping significantly increases the achievable dynamic range of our observations, increasing our observing efficiency and thus better averages over scintillation. Diffusers work in both collimated and converging beams. We present diffuser-assisted optical observations demonstrating $62^{+26}_{-16}$ppm precision in 30 minute bins on a nearby bright star 16-Cygni A (V=5.95) using the ARC 3.5m telescope---within a factor of $\sim$2 of Kepler's photometric precision on the same star. We also show a transit of WASP-85-Ab (V=11.2) and TRES-3b (V=12.4), where the residuals bin down to $180^{+66}_{-41}$ppm in 30 minute bins for WASP-85-Ab---a factor of $\sim$4 of the precision achieved by the K2 mission on this target---and to 101ppm for TRES-3b. In the NIR, where diffusers may provide even more significant improvements over the current state of the art, our preliminary tests have demonstrated $137^{+64}_{-36}$ppm precision for a $K_S =10.8$ star on the 200" Hale Telescope. These photometric precisions match or surpass the expected photometric precisions of TESS for the same magnitude range. This technology is inexpensive, scalable, easily adaptable, and can have an important and immediate impact on the observations of transits and secondary eclipses of exoplanets.
  • We observed two eclipses of the Kepler-13A planetary system, on UT 2014 April 28 and UT 2014 October 13, in the near-infrared using Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. By using the nearby binary stars Kepler-13BC as a reference, we were able to create a differential light curve for Kepler-13A that had little of the systematics typically present in HST/WFC3 spectrophotometry. We measure a broadband (1.1$\mu$m to 1.65$\mu$m) eclipse depth of $734\pm28$ ppm, and are able to measure the emission spectrum of the planet at $R\approx50$ with an average precision of 70 ppm. We find that Kepler-13Ab possesses a noninverted, monotonically decreasing vertical temperature profile. We exclude an isothermal profile and an inverted profile at more than 3$\sigma$. We also find that the dayside emission of Kepler-13Ab appears generally similar to an isolated M7 brown dwarf at a similar effective temperature. Due to the relatively high mass and surface gravity of Kepler-13Ab, we suggest that the apparent lack of an inversion is due to cold-trap processes in the planet's atmosphere. Using a toy model for where cold-traps should inhibit inversions, and observations of other planets in this temperature range with measured emission spectra, we argue that with more detailed modeling and more observations we may be able to place useful constraints on the size of condensates on the daysides of hot Jupiters.
  • Epidemic spreading has been studied for a long time and most of them are focused on the growing aspect of a single epidemic outbreak. Recently, we extended the study to the case of recurrent epidemics (Sci. Rep. {\bf 5}, 16010 (2015)) but limited only to a single network. We here report from the real data of coupled regions or cities that the recurrent epidemics in two coupled networks are closely related to each other and can show either synchronized outbreak phase where outbreaks occur simultaneously in both networks or mixed outbreak phase where outbreaks occur in one network but do not in another one. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we present a two-layered network model of coupled recurrent epidemics to reproduce the synchronized and mixed outbreak phases. We show that the synchronized outbreak phase is preferred to be triggered in two coupled networks with the same average degree while the mixed outbreak phase is preferred for the case with different average degrees. Further, we show that the coupling between the two layers is preferred to suppress the mixed outbreak phase but enhance the synchronized outbreak phase. A theoretical analysis based on microscopic Markov-chain approach is presented to explain the numerical results. This finding opens a new window for studying the recurrent epidemics in multi-layered networks.
  • We present here our observations and analysis of the dayside emission spectrum of the hot Jupiter WASP-103b. We observed WASP-103b during secondary eclipse using two visits of the Hubble Space Telescope with the G141 grism on Wide Field Camera 3 in spatial scan mode. We generated secondary eclipse light curves of the planet in both blended white-light and spectrally binned wavechannels from 1.1-1.7 micron and corrected the light curves for flux contamination from a nearby companion star. We modeled the detector systematics and secondary eclipse spectrum using Gaussian process regression and found that the near-IR emission spectrum of WASP-103b is featureless across the observed near-IR region to down to a sensitivity of 175 ppm, and shows a shallow slope towards the red. The atmosphere has a single brightness temperature of T_B = 2890 K across this wavelength range. This region of the spectrum is indistinguishable from isothermal, but may not manifest from a physically isothermal system, i.e. pseudo-isothermal. A Solar-metallicity profile with a thermal inversion layer at 10^-2 bar fits WASP-103b's spectrum with high confidence, as do an isothermal profile with Solar metallicity and a monotonically decreasing atmosphere with C/O>1. The data rule out a monotonically decreasing atmospheric profile with Solar composition, and we rule out a low-metallicity decreasing profile as non-physical for this system. The pseudo-isothermal profile could be explained by a thermal inversion layer just above the layer probed by our observations, or by clouds or haze in the upper atmosphere. Transmission spectra at optical wavelengths would allow us to better differentiate between potential atmospheric models.
  • The Planet Formation Imager (PFI) project aims to provide a strong scientific vision for ground-based optical astronomy beyond the upcoming generation of Extremely Large Telescopes. We make the case that a breakthrough in angular resolution imaging capabilities is required in order to unravel the processes involved in planet formation. PFI will be optimised to provide a complete census of the protoplanet population at all stellocentric radii and over the age range from 0.1 to about 100 Myr. Within this age period, planetary systems undergo dramatic changes and the final architecture of planetary systems is determined. Our goal is to study the planetary birth on the natural spatial scale where the material is assembled, which is the "Hill Sphere" of the forming planet, and to characterise the protoplanetary cores by measuring their masses and physical properties. Our science working group has investigated the observational characteristics of these young protoplanets as well as the migration mechanisms that might alter the system architecture. We simulated the imprints that the planets leave in the disk and study how PFI could revolutionise areas ranging from exoplanet to extragalactic science. In this contribution we outline the key science drivers of PFI and discuss the requirements that will guide the technology choices, the site selection, and potential science/technology tradeoffs.
  • The intriguing exoplanet candidate KIC 12557548b is believed to have a comet-like tail of dusty debris trailing a small rocky planet. The tail of debris scatters up to 1.3% of the stellar light in the Kepler observatory's bandpass (0.42 um to 0.9 um). Observing the tail's transit depth at multiple wavelengths can reveal the composition and particle size of the debris, constraining the makeup and lifetime of the sub-Mercury planet. Early dust particle size predictions from the scattering of the comet-like tail pointed towards a dust size of ~0.1 um for silicate compositions. These small particles would produce a much deeper optical transit depth than near-infrared transit depth. We measure a transmission spectrum for KIC 12557548b using the SpeX spectrograph (covering 0.8 um to 2.4 um) simultaneously with the MORIS imager taking r' (0.63 um) photometry on the Infrared Telescope Facility for eight nights and one night in H band (1.63 um) using the Wide-Field IR Camera at the Palomar 200-inch telescope. The infrared spectra are plagued by systematic errors, but we argue that sufficient precision is obtained when using differential spectroscopic calibration when combining multiple nights. The average differential transmission spectrum is flat, supporting findings that KIC 12557548b's debris is likely composed of larger particles > ~0.5 um for pyroxene and olivine and > ~0.2 um for iron and corundum. The r' photometric transit depths are all below the average Kepler value, suggesting that the observations occurred during a weak period or that the mechanisms producing optical broadband transit depths are suppressed.
  • Arnold (2005), Forgan (2013), and Korpela et al. (2015) noted that planet-sized artificial structures could be discovered with Kepler as they transit their host star. We present a general discussion of transiting megastructures, and enumerate ten potential ways their anomalous silhouettes, orbits, and transmission properties would distinguish them from exoplanets. We also enumerate the natural sources of such signatures. Several anomalous objects, such as KIC 12557548 and CoRoT-29, have variability in depth consistent with Arnold's prediction and/or an asymmetric shape consistent with Forgan's model. Since well motivated physical models have so far provided natural explanations for these signals, the ETI hypothesis is not warranted for these objects, but they still serve as useful examples of how nonstandard transit signatures might be identified and interpreted in a SETI context. Boyajian et al. 2015 recently announced KIC 8462852, an object with a bizarre light curve consistent with a "swarm" of megastructures. We suggest this is an outstanding SETI target. We develop the normalized information content statistic $M$ to quantify the information content in a signal embedded in a discrete series of bounded measurements, such as variable transit depths, and show that it can be used to distinguish among constant sources, interstellar beacons, and naturally stochastic or artificial, information-rich signals. We apply this formalism to KIC 12557548 and a specific form of beacon suggested by Arnold to illustrate its utility.
  • We report on a total of 106 nights of optical interferometric observations of the $\epsilon$ Aurigae system taken during the last 14 years by four beam combiners at three different interferometric facilities. This long sequence of data provides an ideal assessment of the system prior to, during, and after the recent 2009-2011 eclipse. We have reconstructed model-independent images from the 10 in-eclipse epochs which show that a disk-like object is indeed responsible for the eclipse. Using new 3D, time-dependent modeling software, we derive the properties of the F-star (diameter, limb darkening), determine previously unknown orbital elements ($\Omega$, $i$), and access the global structures of the optically thick portion of the eclipsing disk using both geometric models and approximations of astrophysically relevant density distributions. These models may be useful in future hydrodynamical modeling of the system. Lastly, we address several outstanding research questions including mid-eclipse brightening, possible shrinking of the F-type primary, and any warps or sub-features within the disk.
  • The MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) is a US-based observational facility dedicated to the discovery and characterization of exoplanets around a nearby sample of bright stars. MINERVA employs a robotic array of four 0.7 m telescopes outfitted for both high-resolution spectroscopy and photometry, and is designed for completely autonomous operation. The primary science program is a dedicated radial velocity survey and the secondary science objective is to obtain high precision transit light curves. The modular design of the facility and the flexibility of our hardware allows for both science programs to be pursued simultaneously, while the robotic control software provides a robust and efficient means to carry out nightly observations. In this article, we describe the design of MINERVA including major hardware components, software, and science goals. The telescopes and photometry cameras are characterized at our test facility on the Caltech campus in Pasadena, CA, and their on-sky performance is validated. New observations from our test facility demonstrate sub-mmag photometric precision of one of our radial velocity survey targets, and we present new transit observations and fits of WASP-52b -- a known hot-Jupiter with an inflated radius and misaligned orbit. The facility is now in the process of being relocated to its final destination at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona, and science operations will begin in 2015.
  • For the sake of complete theoretical research of atmospheric refraction, the atmospheric refraction under the condition of lower angles of elevation is still worthy to be analyzed and explored. In some engineering applications, the objects with larger zenith distance must be observed sometimes. Carrying out observational research of the atmospheric refraction at lower angles of elevation has an important significance. It has been considered difficult to measure the atmospheric refraction at lower angles of elevation. A new idea for determining atmospheric refraction by utilizing differential measurement with double fields of view is proposed. Taking the observational principle of HIPPARCOS satellite as a reference, a schematic prototype with double fields of view was developed. In August of 2013, experimental observations were carried out and the atmospheric refractions at lower angles of elevation can be obtained by the schematic prototype. The measured value of the atmospheric refraction at the zenith distance of 78.8 degree is $240.23"\pm0.27"$, and the feasibility of differential measurement of atmospheric refraction with double fields of view was justified. The limitations of the schematic prototype such as inadequate ability of gathering light, lack of accurate meteorological data recording and lower automatic level of observation and data processing were also pointed out, which need to be improved in subsequent work.
  • We report secondary eclipse photometry of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab, taken with Hale/WIRC in H and Ks bands and with Spitzer/IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 micron. We carried out adaptive optics imaging of the planet host star HAT-P-32A and its companion HAT-P-32B in the near-IR and the visible. We clearly resolve the two stars from each other and find a separation of 2.923" +/- 0. 004" and a position angle 110.64 deg +/- 0.12 deg. We measure the flux ratios of the binary in g' r' i' z' and H & Ks bands, and determine Teff = 3565 +/- 82 K for the companion star, corresponding to an M1.5 dwarf. We use PHOENIX stellar atmosphere models to correct the dilution of the secondary eclipse depths of the hot Jupiter due to the presence of the M1.5 companion. We also improve the secondary eclipse photometry by accounting for the non-classical, flux-dependent nonlinearity of the WIRC IR detector in the H band. We measure planet-to-star flux ratios of 0.090 +/- 0.033%, 0.178 +/- 0.057%, 0.364 +/- 0.016%, and 0.438 +/- 0.020% in the H, Ks, 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands, respectively. We compare these with planetary atmospheric models, and find they prefer an atmosphere with a temperature inversion and inefficient heat redistribution. However, we also find that the data are equally well-described by a blackbody model for the planet with Tp = 2042 +/- 50 K. Finally, we measure a secondary eclipse timing offset of 0.3 +/- 1.3 min from the predicted mid-eclipse time, which constrains e = 0.0072 +0.0700/-0.0064 when combined with RV data and is more consistent with a circular orbit.
  • The Exoplanet Orbit Database (EOD) compiles orbital, transit, host star, and other parameters of robustly detected exoplanets reported in the peer-reviewed literature. The EOD can be navigated through the Exoplanet Data Explorer (EDE) Plotter and Table, available on the World Wide Web at exoplanets.org. The EOD contains data for 1492 confirmed exoplanets as of July 2014. The EOD descends from a table in Butler et al. (2002) and the Catalog of Nearby Exoplanets (Butler et al. 2006), and the first complete documentation for the EOD and the EDE was presented in Wright et al. (2011). In this work, we describe our work since then. We have expanded the scope of the EOD to include secondary eclipse parameters, asymmetric uncertainties, and expanded the EDE to include the sample of over 3000 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), and other real planets without good orbital parameters (such as many of those detected by microlensing and imaging). Users can download the latest version of the entire EOD as a single comma separated value file from the front page of exoplanets.org.
  • Kepler-13Ab (= KOI-13.01) is a unique transiting hot Jupiter. It is one of very few known short-period planets orbiting a hot A-type star, making it one of the hottest planets currently known. The availability of Kepler data allows us to measure the planet's occultation (secondary eclipse) and phase curve in the optical, which we combine with occultations observed by warm Spitzer at 4.5 mic and 3.6 mic and a ground-based occultation observation in the Ks band (2.1 mic). We derive a day-side hemisphere temperature of 2,750 +- 160 K as the effective temperature of a black body showing the same occultation depths. Comparing the occultation depths with one-dimensional planetary atmosphere models suggests the presence of an atmospheric temperature inversion. Our analysis shows evidence for a relatively high geometric albedo, Ag= 0.33 +0.04 -0.06. While measured with a simplistic method, a high Ag is supported also by the fact that the one-dimensional atmosphere models underestimate the occultation depth in the optical. We use stellar spectra to determine the dilution, in the four wide bands where occultation was measured, due to the visual stellar binary companion 1.15 +- 0.05" away. The revised stellar parameters measured using these spectra are combined with other measurements leading to revised planetary mass and radius estimates of Mp = 4.94 - 8.09 Mjup and Rp = 1.406 +- 0.038 Rjup. Finally, we measure a Kepler mid-occultation time that is 34.0 +- 6.9 s earlier than expected based on the mid-transit time and the delay due to light travel time, and discuss possible scenarios.
  • Hot Jupiters with brightness temperatures > ~2000K can have TiO and VO molecules as gaseous species in their atmospheres. The TiO and VO molecules can potentially induce temperature inversions in hot Jupiter atmospheres and also have an observable signature of large optical to infrared transit depth ratios. Previous transmission spectra of very hot Jupiters have shown a lack of TiO and VO, but only in planets that also appear to lack temperature inversions. We measure the transmission spectrum of CoRoT-1b, a hot Jupiter that was predicted to have a temperature inversion potentially due to significant TiO and VO in its atmosphere. We employ the multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) method using the SpeX and MORIS instruments on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and the Gaussian Process method to model red noise. By using a simultaneous reference star on the slit for calibration and a wide slit to minimize slit losses, we achieve transit depth precision of 0.03% to 0.09%, comparable to the atmospheric scale height but detect no statistically significant molecular features. We combine our IRTF data with optical CoRoT transmission measurements to search for differences in the optical and near infrared absorption that would arise from TiO/VO. Our IRTF spectrum and the CoRoT photometry disfavor a TiO/VO-rich spectrum for CoRoT-1b, suggesting that the atmosphere has another absorber that could create a temperature inversion or that the blackbody-like emission from the planet is due to a spectroscopically flat cloud, dust or haze layer that smoothes out molecular features in both CoRoT-1b's emission and transmission spectra. This system represents the faintest planet hosting star (K=12.2) with a measured planetary transmission spectrum.
  • We report secondary eclipse photometry of two hot Jupiters, WASP-48b and HAT-P-23b, at 3.6 and 4.5 um taken with the InfraRed Array Camera aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope during the warm Spitzer mission and in the H and Ks bands with the Wide Field IR Camera at the Palomar 200-inch Hale Telescope. WASP-48b and HAT-P-23b are Jupiter-mass and twice Jupiter-mass objects orbiting an old, slightly evolved F star and an early G dwarf star, respectively. In the H, Ks, 3.6 um, and 4.5 um bands, respectively, we measure secondary eclipse depths of 0.047% +/- 0.016%, 0.109% +/- 0.027%, 0.176% +/- 0.013%, and 0.214% +/- 0.020% for WASP-48b. In the Ks, 3.6 um, and 4.5 um bands, respectively, we measure secondary eclipse depths of 0.234% +/- 0.046%, 0.248% +/- 0.019%, and 0.309% +/- 0.026% for HAT-P-23b. For WASP-48b and HAT-P-23b, respectively, we measure delays of 2.6 +/- 3.9 minutes and 4.0 +/- 2.4 minutes relative to the predicted times of secondary eclipse for circular orbits, placing 2-sigma upper limits on |e cos(omega)| of 0.0053 and 0.0080, both of which are consistent with circular orbits. The dayside emission spectra of these planets are well-described by blackbodies with effective temperatures of 2158 +/- 100 K (WASP-48b) and 2154 +/- 90 K (HAT-P-23b), corresponding to moderate recirculation in the zero albedo case. Our measured eclipse depths are also consistent with one-dimensional radiative transfer models featuring varying degrees of recirculation and weak thermal inversions or no inversions at all. We discuss how the absence of strong temperature inversions on these planets may be related to the activity levels and metallicities of their host stars.
  • Along with today's data explosion and application diversification, a variety of hardware platforms for big data are emerging, attracting interests from both industry and academia. The existing hardware platforms represent a wide range of implementation approaches, and different hardware platforms have different strengths. In this paper, we conduct comprehensive evaluations on three representative big data systems: Intel Xeon, Atom (low power processors), and many-core Tilera using BigDataBench - a big data benchmark suite. Then we explore the relative performance of the three implementation approaches by running BigDataBench, and provide strong guidance for the big data systems construction. Through our experiments, we have inferred that a big data system based on specific hardware has different performance in the context of different applications and data volumes. When we construct a system, we should take into account not only the performance or energy consumption of the pure hardware, but also the characteristics of applications running on them. Data scale, application type and complexity should be considered comprehensively when researchers or architects plan to choose fundamental components for their big data systems.
  • We present the measured projected obliquity -- the sky-projected angle between the stellar spin axis and orbital angular momentum -- of the inner planet of the HAT-P-17 multi-planet system. We measure the sky-projected obliquity of the star to be \lambda=19+/-15 degrees by modeling the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect in Keck/HIRES radial velocities (RVs). The anomalous RV time series shows an asymmetry relative to the midtransit time, ordinarily suggesting a nonzero obliquity -- but in this case at least part of the asymmetry may be due to the convective blueshift, increasing the uncertainty in the determination of \lambda. We employ the semi-analytical approach of Hirano et al. (2011) that includes the effects of macroturbulence, instrumental broadening, and convective blueshift to accurately model the anomaly in the net RV caused by the planet eclipsing part of the rotating star. Obliquity measurements are an important tool for testing theories of planet formation and migration. To date, the measured obliquities of ~50 Jovian planets span the full range, from prograde to retrograde, with planets orbiting cool stars preferentially showing alignment of stellar spins and planetary orbits. Our results are consistent with this pattern emerging from tidal interactions in the convective envelopes of cool stars and close-in planets. In addition, our 1.8 years of new RVs for this system show that the orbit of the outer planet is more poorly constrained than previously thought, with an orbital period now in the range of 10-36 years.
  • In this letter, we consider a joint macro-relay network with densely deployed relay stations (RSs) and dynamically varied traffic load measured by the number of users. An energy-efficient strategy is proposed by intelligently adjusting the RS working modes (active or sleeping) according to the traffic variation. Explicit expressions related to the network energy efficiency are derived based on stochastic geometry theory. Simulation results demonstrate that the derived analytic results are reasonable and the proposed strategy can significantly improve the network energy efficiency.
  • Optimal power allocation for orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) wiretap channels with Gaussian channel inputs has already been studied in some previous works from an information theoretical viewpoint. However, these results are not sufficient for practical system design. One reason is that discrete channel inputs, such as quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) signals, instead of Gaussian channel inputs, are deployed in current practical wireless systems to maintain moderate peak transmission power and receiver complexity. In this paper, we investigate the power allocation and artificial noise design for OFDM wiretap channels with discrete channel inputs. We first prove that the secrecy rate function for discrete channel inputs is nonconcave with respect to the transmission power. To resolve the corresponding nonconvex secrecy rate maximization problem, we develop a low-complexity power allocation algorithm, which yields a duality gap diminishing in the order of O(1/\sqrt{N}), where N is the number of subcarriers of OFDM. We then show that independent frequency-domain artificial noise cannot improve the secrecy rate of single-antenna wiretap channels. Towards this end, we propose a novel time-domain artificial noise design which exploits temporal degrees of freedom provided by the cyclic prefix of OFDM systems {to jam the eavesdropper and boost the secrecy rate even with a single antenna at the transmitter}. Numerical results are provided to illustrate the performance of the proposed design schemes.
  • We present new quasars discovered in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies with the LAMOST during the 2010 and 2011 observational seasons. Quasar candidates are selected based on the available SDSS, KPNO 4 m telescope, XSTPS optical, and WISE near infrared photometric data. We present 509 new quasars discovered in a stripe of ~135 sq. deg from M31 to M33 along the Giant Stellar Stream in the 2011 pilot survey datasets, and also 17 new quasars discovered in an area of ~100 sq. deg that covers the central region and the southeastern halo of M31 in the 2010 commissioning datasets. These 526 new quasars have i magnitudes ranging from 15.5 to 20.0, redshifts from 0.1 to 3.2. They represent a significant increase of the number of identified quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33. There are now 26, 62 and 139 known quasars in this region of the sky with i magnitudes brighter than 17.0, 17.5 and 18.0 respectively, of which 5, 20 and 75 are newly-discovered. These bright quasars provide an invaluable collection with which to probe the kinematics and chemistry of the ISM/IGM in the Local Group of galaxies. A total of 93 quasars are now known with locations within 2.5 deg of M31, of which 73 are newly discovered. Tens of quasars are now known to be located behind the Giant Stellar Stream, and hundreds behind the extended halo and its associated substructures of M31. The much enlarged sample of known quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33 can potentially be utilized to construct a perfect astrometric reference frame to measure the minute PMs of M31 and M33, along with the PMs of substructures associated with the Local Group of galaxies. Those PMs are some of the most fundamental properties of the Local Group.
  • We report that Kepler Object of Interest 256 (KOI-256) is a mutually eclipsing post-common envelope binary (ePCEB), consisting of a cool white dwarf (M = 0.592 +/- 0.089 MSun, R = 0.01345 +/- 0.00091 RSun, Teff = 7100 +/- 700 K) and an active M3 dwarf (M = 0.51 +/- 0.16 MSun, R = 0.540 +/- 0.014 RSun, Teff = 3450 +/- 50 K) with an orbital period of 1.37865 +/- 0.00001 days. KOI-256 is listed as hosting a transiting planet-candidate by Borucki et al. and Batalha et al.; here we report that the planet-candidate transit signal is in fact the occultation of a white dwarf as it passes behind the M dwarf. We combine publicly-available long- and short-cadence Kepler light curves with ground-based measurements to robustly determine the system parameters. The occultation events are readily apparent in the Kepler light curve, as is spin-orbit synchronization of the M dwarf, and we detect the transit of the white dwarf in front of the M dwarf halfway between the occultation events. The size of the white dwarf with respect to the Einstein ring during transit (REin = 0.00473 +/- 0.00055 RSun) causes the transit depth to be shallower than expected from pure geometry due to gravitational lensing. KOI-256 is an old, long-period ePCEB and serves as a benchmark object for studying the evolution of binary star systems as well as white dwarfs themselves, thanks largely to the availability of near-continuous, ultra-precise Kepler photometry.