• We combine an analytically solvable mean-field elasto-plastic model with molecular dynamics simulations of a generic glass-former to demonstrate that, depending on their preparation protocol, amorphous materials can yield in two qualitatively distinct ways. We show that well-annealed systems yield in a discontinuous brittle way, as metallic and molecular glasses do. Yielding corresponds in this case to a first-order nonequilibrium phase transition. As the degree of annealing decreases, the first-order character becomes weaker and the transition terminates in a second-order critical point in the universality class of an Ising model in a random field. For even more poorly annealed systems, yielding becomes a smooth crossover, representative of the ductile rheological behavior generically observed in foams, emulsions, and colloidal glasses. Our results show that the variety of yielding behavior found in amorphous materials does not result from the diversity of particle interactions or microscopic dynamics {\it per se}, but is instead unified by carefully considering the role of the initial stability of the system.
  • The behavior of glass-forming liquids presents complex features of both dynamic and thermodynamic nature. Some studies indicate the presence of thermodynamic anomalies and crossovers in the dynamic properties, but their origin and degree of universality is difficult to assess. Moreover, conventional simulations are barely able to cover the range of temperatures at which these crossovers usually occur. To address these issues, we simulate the Kob-Andersen Lennard-Jones mixture using efficient protocols that make use of either multi-CPU or multi-GPU parallel tempering and hence allow us to extend appreciably the range in which thermodynamic and dynamic measurements can be done in equilibrium. Thanks to the more efficient exploration of configuration space, we can equilibrate the liquid well below the critical temperature of mode-coupling theory, $T_{MCT} = 0.435$. We find that below $T=0.4$ the analysis is hampered by partial crystallization of the metastable liquid, which nucleates extended regions populated by large particles arranged in an fcc structure. By filtering out crystalline samples, we reveal that the specific heat grows in a regular manner down to about $T=0.37$. Possible thermodynamic anomalies suggested by previous studies can thus occur only in a region of the phase diagram where the system is highly metastable. Using the equilibrium configurations obtained from the parallel tempering simulations, we perform molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to probe the equilibrium dynamics in the regime down to $T=0.4$. A temperature-derivative analysis of the relaxation time and diffusion data allows us to assess different dynamic scenarios around $T_{MCT}$. Hints of a dynamic crossover come from analysis of the four-point dynamic susceptibility. Finally, we discuss possible future numerical strategies to clarify the nature of crossover phenomena in glass-forming liquids.
  • We use computer simulations to probe the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of a glass-former that undergoes an ideal glass-transition because of the presence of randomly pinned particles. We find that even deep in the equilibrium glass state the system relaxes to some extent because of the presence of localized excitations that allow the system to access different inherent structures, giving thus rise to a non-trivial contribution to the entropy. By calculating with high accuracy the vibrational part of the entropy, we show that also in the equilibrium glass state thermodynamics and dynamics give a coherent picture and that glasses should not be seen as a disordered solid in which the particles undergo just vibrational motion but instead as a system with a highly nonlinear internal dynamics.
  • Computer simulations give precious insight into the microscopic behavior of supercooled liquids and glasses, but their typical time scales are orders of magnitude shorter than the experimentally relevant ones. We recently closed this gap for a class of models of size polydisperse fluids, which we successfully equilibrate beyond laboratory time scales by means of the swap Monte Carlo algorithm. In this contribution, we study the interplay between compositional and geometric local orders in a model of polydisperse hard spheres equilibrated with this algorithm. Local compositional order has a weak state dependence, while local geometric order associated to icosahedral arrangements grows more markedly but only at very high density. We quantify the correlation lengths and the degree of sphericity associated to icosahedral structures and compare these results to those for the Wahnstr\"om Lennard-Jones mixture. Finally, we analyze the structure of very dense samples that partially crystallized following a pattern incompatible with conventional fractionation scenarios. The crystal structure has the symmetry of aluminum diboride and involves a subset of small and large particles with size ratio approximately equal to 0.5.
  • We numerically study the jamming transition of frictionless polydisperse spheres in three dimensions. We use an efficient thermalisation algorithm for the equilibrium hard sphere fluid and generate amorphous jammed packings over a range of critical jamming densities that is about three times broader than in previous studies. This allows us to reexamine a wide range of structural properties characterizing the jamming transition. Both isostaticity and the critical behavior of the pair correlation function hold over the entire range of jamming densities. At intermediate length scales, we find a weak, smooth increase of bond orientational order. By contrast, distorted icosahedral structures grow rapidly with increasing the volume fraction in both fluid and jammed states. Surprisingly, at large scale we observe that denser jammed states show stronger deviations from hyperuniformity, suggesting that the enhanced amorphous ordering inherited from the equilibrium fluid competes with, rather than enhances, hyperuniformity. Finally, finite size fluctuations of the critical jamming density are considerably suppressed in the denser jammed states, indicating an important change in the topography of the potential energy landscape. By considerably stretching the amplitude of the critical "J-line", our work disentangles physical properties at the contact scale that are associated with jamming criticality, from those occurring at larger length scales, which have a different nature.
  • Liquids relax extremely slowly on approaching the glass state. One explanation is that an entropy crisis, due to the rarefaction of available states, makes it increasingly arduous to reach equilibrium in that regime. Validating this scenario is challenging, because experiments offer limited resolution, while numerical studies lag more than eight orders of magnitude behind experimentally-relevant timescales. In this work we not only close the colossal gap between experiments and simulations but manage to create in-silico configurations that have no experimental analog yet. Deploying a range of computational tools, we obtain four estimates of their configurational entropy. These measurements consistently confirm that the steep entropy decrease observed in experiments is found also in simulations even beyond the experimental glass transition. Our numerical results thus open a new observational window into the physics of glasses and reinforce the relevance of an entropy crisis for understanding their formation.
  • Classical particle systems characterized by continuous size polydispersity, such as colloidal materials, are not straightforwardly described using statistical mechanics, since fundamental issues may arise from particle distinguishability. Because the mixing entropy in such systems is divergent in the thermodynamic limit we show that the configurational entropy estimated from standard computational approaches to characterize glassy states also diverges. This reasoning would suggest that polydisperse materials cannot undergo a glass transition, in contradiction to experiments. We explain that this argument stems from the confusion between configurations in phase space and states defined by free energy minima, and propose a simple method to compute a finite and physically meaningful configurational entropy in continuously polydisperse systems. Physically, the proposed approach relies on an effective description of the system as an $M^*$-component system with a finite $M^*$, for which finite mixing and configurational entropies are obtained. We show how to directly determine $M^*$ from computer simulations in a range of glass-forming models with different size polydispersities, characterized by hard and soft interparticle interactions, and by additive and non-additive interactions. Our approach provides consistent results in all cases and demonstrates that the configurational entropy of polydisperse system exists, is finite, and can be quantitatively estimated.
  • We perform molecular dynamics simulations for a silica glass former model proposed by Coslovich and Pastore (CP) over a wide range of densities. The density variation can be mapped onto the change of the potential depth between Si and O interactions of the CP model. By reducing the potential depth (or increasing the density), the anisotropic tetrahedral network structure observed in the original CP model transforms into the isotropic structure with the purely repulsive soft-sphere potential. Correspondingly, the temperature dependence of the relaxation time exhibits the crossover from the Arrhenius to the super-Arrhenius behavior. Being able to control the fragility over a wide range by tuning the potential of a single model system helps us to bridge the gap between the network and isotropic glass formers and to obtain the insight into the underlying mechanism of the fragility. We study the relationship between the fragility and dynamical properties such as the magnitude of the Stokes-Einstein violation and the stretch exponent in the density correlation function. We also demonstrate that the peak of the specific heat systematically shifts as the density increases, hinting that the fragility is correlated with the hidden thermodynamic anomalies of the system.
  • We implement and optimize a particle-swap Monte-Carlo algorithm that allows us to thermalize a polydisperse system of hard spheres up to unprecedentedly-large volume fractions, where \revise{previous} algorithms and experiments fail to equilibrate. We show that no glass singularity intervenes before the jamming density, which we independently determine through two distinct non-equilibrium protocols. We demonstrate that equilibrium fluid and non-equilibrium jammed states can have the same density, showing that the jamming transition cannot be the end-point of the fluid branch.
  • Reply to the preceding letter by Chakrabarty et al. [Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA, 112, no. 35, E4818-E4820 (2015)].
  • We use computer simulations to study the thermodynamic properties of a glass former in which a fraction $c$ of the particles has been permanently frozen. By thermodynamic integration, we determine the Kauzmann, or ideal glass transition, temperature $T_K(c)$ at which the configurational entropy vanishes. This is done without resorting to any kind of extrapolation, {\it i.e.}, $T_K(c)$ is indeed an equilibrium property of the system. We also measure the distribution function of the overlap, {\it i.e.}, the order parameter that signals the glass state. We find that the transition line obtained from the overlap coincides with that obtained from the thermodynamic integration, thus showing that the two approaches give the same transition line. Finally we determine the geometrical properties of the potential energy landscape, notably the $T-$and $c-$dependence of the saddle index and use these properties to obtain the dynamic transition temperature $T_d(c)$. The two temperatures $T_K(c)$ and $T_d(c)$ cross at a finite value of $c$ and indicate the point at which the glass transition line ends. These findings are qualitatively consistent with the scenario proposed by the random first order transition theory.
  • Recent studies show that volume fractions $\phiJ$ at the jamming transition of frictionless hard spheres and discs are not uniquely determined but exist over a continuous range. Motivated by this observation, we numerically investigate dependence of $\phiJ$ on the initial configurations of the parent fluids equilibrated at a fraction $\phiini$, before compressing to generate a jammed packing. We find that $\phiJ$ remains constant when $\phiini$ is small but sharply increases when $\phiini$ exceeds the dynamic transition point which the mode-coupling theory predicts. We carefully analyze configurational properties of both jammed packings and parent fluids and find that, while all jammed packings remain isostatic, the increase of $\phiJ$ is accompanied with subtle but distinct changes of (i) local orders, (ii) a static length scale, and (iii) an exponent of the finite size scaling. These results quantitatively support the scenario of the random first order transition theoryof the glass transition.